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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9362
Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.76
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

34 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 157-173, 156 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

156. It was self-slaughter – they descended to
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 941-942, 947-949, 986-991, 940 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

940. The hardest of all things, which men subdue
3. Homer, Iliad, 24.128-24.132 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

24.128. /and in the hut a ram, great and shaggy, lay slaughtered for them. Then she, his queenly mother, sate her down close by his side and stroked him with her hand, and spake, and called him by name:My child, how long wilt thou devour thine heart with weeping and sorrowing, and wilt take no thought of food 24.129. /and in the hut a ram, great and shaggy, lay slaughtered for them. Then she, his queenly mother, sate her down close by his side and stroked him with her hand, and spake, and called him by name:My child, how long wilt thou devour thine heart with weeping and sorrowing, and wilt take no thought of food 24.130. /neither of the couch? Good were it for thee even to have dalliance in a woman's embrace. For, I tell thee, thou shalt not thyself be long in life, but even now doth death stand hard by thee and mighty fate. But hearken thou forthwith unto me, for I am a messenger unto thee from Zeus. He declareth that that the gods are angered with thee 24.131. /neither of the couch? Good were it for thee even to have dalliance in a woman's embrace. For, I tell thee, thou shalt not thyself be long in life, but even now doth death stand hard by thee and mighty fate. But hearken thou forthwith unto me, for I am a messenger unto thee from Zeus. He declareth that that the gods are angered with thee 24.132. /neither of the couch? Good were it for thee even to have dalliance in a woman's embrace. For, I tell thee, thou shalt not thyself be long in life, but even now doth death stand hard by thee and mighty fate. But hearken thou forthwith unto me, for I am a messenger unto thee from Zeus. He declareth that that the gods are angered with thee
4. Homer, Odyssey, 4.561-4.568 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Mimnermus of Colophon, Fragments, 2, 4, 6, 1 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

6. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 500 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

500. μαινάδων τῶνδʼ ἐφέρ- 500. will not come stealthily upon such deeds—I will let loose death in every form. And as he anticipates his neighbor’s evils, one man
7. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 700, 699 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

699. σῃ βίον εὖ κυρήσας· μελάναιγις δʼ· οὐκ
8. Pindar, Fragments, 133 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Pindar, Isthmian Odes, 6.19-6.20, 7.3-7.5 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 4.49-4.50 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 2.53-2.75, 2.77-2.83, 8.22 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Bacchae, 1339, 181-183, 263-265, 57-59, 1338 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1338. σχήσουσι· σὲ δʼ Ἄρης Ἁρμονίαν τε ῥύσεται
13. Euripides, Helen, 1302-1368, 1301 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1301. ̓Ορεία ποτὲ δρομάδι κώ- 1301. Once with swift foot the mountain mother of the gods rushed through the wooded glen, and the river’s stream
14. Euripides, Orestes, 338, 411, 337 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1490-1503, 1489 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Pherecydes of Athens, Fragments, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

17. Plato, Meno, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

81b. and many another poet of heavenly gifts. As to their words, they are these: mark now, if you judge them to be true. They say that the soul of man is immortal, and at one time comes to an end, which is called dying, and at another is born again, but never perishes. Consequently one ought to live all one’s life in the utmost holiness. For from whomsoever Persephone shall accept requital for ancient wrong, the souls of these she restores in the ninth year to the upper sun again; from them arise
18. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

69d. which has within it passions both fearful and unavoidable—firstly, pleasure, a most mighty lure to evil; next, pains, which put good to rout; and besides these, rashness and fear, foolish counsellors both and anger, hard to dissuade; and hope, ready to seduce. And blending these with irrational sensation and with all-daring lust, they thus compounded in necessary fashion the mortal kind of soul. Wherefore, since they scrupled to pollute the divine, unless through absolute necessity
20. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 1.11.24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

21. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 194 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

194. These are the fountains of errors. We must now examine that of prudence. To this one it is that perseverance, that is to say, Rebecca, descends; and after she has filled up the whole vessel of her soul she goes up again, the lawgiver, most strictly in accordance with natural truth, calling her return an ascent; for whoever brings his mind to descend from over-arrogant haughtiness is raised to a great height of virtue.
22. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 14-15, 19-55, 13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. And they having descended into the body as into a river, at one time are carried away and swallowed up by the voracity of a most violent whirlpool; and, at another time, striving with all their power to resist its impetuosity, they at first swim on the top of it, and afterwards fly back to the place from which they started.
23. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 135, 134 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

134. After this, Moses says that "God made man, having taken clay from the earth, and he breathed into his face the breath of life." And by this expression he shows most clearly that there is a vast difference between man as generated now, and the first man who was made according to the image of God. For man as formed now is perceptible to the external senses, partaking of qualities, consisting of body and soul, man or woman, by nature mortal. But man, made according to the image of God, was an idea, or a genus, or a seal, perceptible only by the intellect, incorporeal, neither male nor female, imperishable by nature.
24. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 200-205, 199 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

199. Again, who is there who would deny that those men who were born of him who was made out of the earth were noble themselves, and the founders of noble families? persons who have received a birth more excellent than that of any succeeding generation, in being sprung from the first wedded pair, from the first man and woman, who then for the first time came together for the propagation of offspring resembling themselves. But, nevertheless, when there were two persons so born, the elder of them endured to slay the younger; and, having committed the great and most accursed crime of fratricide, he first defiled the ground with human blood.
25. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 114 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

114. but of the lovers of knowledge the prophet speaks in a great song, and says, "That she has made them to ascend upon the strength of the earth, and has fed them upon the produce of the Fields," showing plainly that the godless man fails in attaining his object, in order that he may grieve the more while strength is not added to these operations in which he expends his energies, but while on the other hand it is take from them; but they who follow after virtue, placing it above all these things which are earthly and mortal, disregard their strength in their exceeding abundance, using God as the guide to conduct them in their ascent, who proffers to them the produce of the earth for their enjoyment and most profitable use, likening the virtues to fields, and the fruits of the virtues to the produce of the fields, according to the principles of their generation; for from prudence is derived prudent action, and from temperance temperate action, and from piety pious conduct, and from each of the other virtues is derived the energy in accordance with it. XXXI.
26. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 3.100, 3.212, 18.87 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.212. 8. But Moses refused all that honor which he saw the multitude ready to bestow upon him, and attended to nothing else but the service of God. He went no more up to Mount Sinai; but he went into the tabernacle, and brought back answers from God for what he prayed for. His habit was also that of a private man, and in all other circumstances he behaved himself like one of the common people, and was desirous to appear without distinguishing himself from the multitude, but would have it known that he did nothing else but take care of them. 18.87. but Pilate prevented their going up, by seizing upon file roads with a great band of horsemen and foot-men, who fell upon those that were gotten together in the village; and when it came to an action, some of them they slew, and others of them they put to flight, and took a great many alive, the principal of which, and also the most potent of those that fled away, Pilate ordered to be slain.
27. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.31, 1.420, 6.47 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.31. Now these caves were in the precipices of craggy mountains, and could not be come at from any side, since they had only some winding pathways, very narrow, by which they got up to them; but the rock that lay on their front had beneath it valleys of a vast depth, and of an almost perpendicular declivity; insomuch that the king was doubtful for a long time what to do, by reason of a kind of impossibility there was of attacking the place. Yet did he at length make use of a contrivance that was subject to the utmost hazard; 1.31. 1. At the same time that Antiochus, who was called Epiphanes, had a quarrel with the sixth Ptolemy about his right to the whole country of Syria, a great sedition fell among the men of power in Judea, and they had a contention about obtaining the government; while each of those that were of dignity could not endure to be subject to their equals. However, Onias, one of the high priests, got the better, and cast the sons of Tobias out of the city; 6.47. For what man of virtue is there who does not know, that those souls which are severed from their fleshly bodies in battles by the sword are received by the ether, that purest of elements, and joined to that company which are placed among the stars; that they become good demons, and propitious heroes, and show themselves as such to their posterity afterwards?
28. New Testament, John, 19.41 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19.41. Now in the place where he was crucified there was a garden. In the garden a new tomb in which no man had ever yet been laid.
29. New Testament, Matthew, 27.60 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

27.60. and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn out in the rock, and he rolled a great stone to the door of the tomb, and departed.
30. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.34.1-1.34.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.34.1. The land of Oropus, between Attica and the land of Tanagra, which originally belonged to Boeotia, in our time belongs to the Athenians, who always fought for it but never won secure pos session until Philip gave it to them after taking Thebes . The city is on the coast and affords nothing remarkable to record. About twelve stades from the city is a sanctuary of Amphiaraus. 1.34.2. Legend says that when Amphiaraus was exiled from Thebes the earth opened and swallowed both him and his chariot. Only they say that the incident did not happen here, the place called the Chariot being on the road from Thebes to Chalcis . The divinity of Amphiaraus was first established among the Oropians, from whom afterwards all the Greeks received the cult. I can enumerate other men also born at this time who are worshipped among the Greeks as gods; some even have cities dedicated to them, such as Eleus in Chersonnesus dedicated to Protesilaus, and Lebadea of the Boeotians dedicated to Trophonius. The Oropians have both a temple and a white marble statue of Amphiaraus. 1.34.3. The altar shows parts. One part is to Heracles, Zeus, and Apollo Healer, another is given up to heroes and to wives of heroes, the third is to Hestia and Hermes and Amphiaraus and the children of Amphilochus. But Alcmaeon, because of his treatment of Eriphyle, is honored neither in the temple of Amphiaraus nor yet with Amphilochus. The fourth portion of the altar is to Aphrodite and Panacea, and further to Iaso, Health and Athena Healer. The fifth is dedicated to the nymphs and to Pan, and to the rivers Achelous and Cephisus. The Athenians too have an altar to Amphilochus in the city, and there is at Mallus in Cilicia an oracle of his which is the most trustworthy of my day. 1.34.4. The Oropians have near the temple a spring, which they call the Spring of Amphiaraus; they neither sacrifice into it nor are wont to use it for purifications or for lustral water. But when a man has been cured of a disease through a response the custom is to throw silver and coined gold into the spring, for by this way they say that Amphiaraus rose up after he had become a god. Iophon the Cnossian, a guide, produced responses in hexameter verse, saying that Amphiaraus gave them to the Argives who were sent against Thebes . These verses unrestrainedly appealed to popular taste. Except those whom they say Apollo inspired of old none of the seers uttered oracles, but they were good at explaining dreams and interpreting the flights of birds and the entrails of victims. 1.34.5. My opinion is that Amphiaraus devoted him self most to the exposition of dreams. It is manifest that, when his divinity was established, it was a dream oracle that he set up. One who has come to consult Amphiaraus is wont first to purify himself. The mode of purification is to sacrifice to the god, and they sacrifice not only to him but also to all those whose names are on the altar. And when all these things have been first done, they sacrifice a ram, and, spreading the skin under them, go to sleep and await enlightenment in a dream.
31. Aeschines, Or., 2.147

32. Mimnermus, Fragments, 2, 4, 6, 1

33. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 55.7

34. Xenophanes, Fr. (W), None



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acherusian sea (lake) Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
achilles Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232, 233; Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 21
aeschines Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
aeschylus, afterlife beliefs in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
aetolia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
afterlife, punishment in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
afterlife, reward in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604, 605
afterlife Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457; Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604, 605
aigle Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
akeso Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
alcaeus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
amazons Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
ambraciot gulf Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
amphiaraus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
amphilochian argos Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
amphilochus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
aphrodite Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 36
apollo Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
apostrophe Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
archive Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
aristides Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
aristoteles, peripatetics Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
ascent, adam, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
ascent, frightful Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
ascent, soul, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
ascent Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
asclepius, sons of Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
asclepius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
assistant Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 36
athens Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
belief Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
black sea Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
body Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
boeotia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
callinus of ephesos Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
carpe diem motif Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
cave Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
chios Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
chorus (male, female), of e. bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
cilicia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
cronus Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 100
cult, oracular cult Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
cult Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
cyprus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
death, unavoidability Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
deification, heroes Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
dionysos Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
dionysus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232; Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 36
egypt Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
elysian fields Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
elysion pedion, makaron nesoi Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
elysion pedion Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
elysium Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
epione Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
epithets Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
erinyes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604
eschatology Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
ethiopians Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
euripides, exodos (missing part/lacuna) of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
eurystheus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
eōs Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
fate, adam, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
god, presence of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
gods Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
great Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 36
greece, archaic period Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
hades, underworld Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
hades Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
health Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
heaven, place of divinities, paradisiacal conditions Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
helios Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 36
heracles Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
heraclides Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 21
heraclids Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
hermes Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 36
hero cult Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
heroization Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
hesiod Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
homer, odyssey Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
homer Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
homeric hymn to dionysus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
hygieia Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
hymn, verse hymn Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
iaso Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
immortality, of gods, eternal life Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
individual, the Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
island of the blessed Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232, 233
isle of the blessed Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 605
isocrates Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
jesus christ, and dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
joseph of arimathea Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
judas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
language Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
lucian of samosata Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
machaon Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
madness Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
mallus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
memnon Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
menelaus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
metempsychosis (transmigration of soul, reincarnation) Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 605
mimnermus Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
moses Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
mystery cults Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 605
nile Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
odyssey Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
olbia Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
olympia Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 75
oracle Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
orphism Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 605
panacea Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
papyri Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
peloponnese Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
penthesilea Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
pherecydes Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
pindar, afterlife beliefs in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604, 605
pindar Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233; Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 21
plato Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 21; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
podalirius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
post-mortality belief, belief, greek context Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
post-mortality belief, representation of, greek context Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
progeny Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
pythagoras, pythagoreans Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 21
pythagoreanism xxv, metempsychosis Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 605
reception, of concepts and ideas Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
reincarnation Long, Immortality in Ancient Philosophy (2019) 21
resemblances, reception Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
resurrection Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
right versus left Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 100
sailing Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
scythians Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
simonides Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
sinai Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
soul, adam, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
teiresias Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
thebes Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
theologos (iohannes) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
theotokos (mother of god) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 176
theron Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 75
theron of acragas Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 604, 605
thirst Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 100
thrace Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232, 233
troja Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
trophonius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
tyrtaeus Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 24
underworld, geography of Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 100
underworld, tripartite Graf and Johnston, Ritual texts for the afterlife: Orpheus and the Bacchic Gold Tablets (2007) 100
violence Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
virtue Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 457
war Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232
water Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 57
white island Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 232, 233
winds Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
zephyr Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 233
zeus' Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 36
zeus Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 140