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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9362
Pindar, Olympian Odes, 10.53-10.59
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 27-34, 26 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

26. of Helicon, and in those early day
2. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 675, 674 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

674. ἄρχοντί τʼ ἄρχων καὶ κασιγνήτῳ κάσις
3. Parmenides, Fragments, 1.28-1.30 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Pindar, Fragments, 33, 159 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Pindar, Nemean Odes, 10.49-10.54 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1.25-1.27, 1.36, 1.39-1.41, 1.46-1.52, 2.3-2.4, 3.11-3.18, 8.1-8.2, 10.3-10.7, 10.28-10.52, 10.54-10.59, 10.65-10.66, 10.78, 10.84-10.85 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 10.66 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Sophocles, Ajax, 647, 646 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.64 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.64. now these immoral fables enshrined a decidedly clever scientific theory. Their meaning was that the highest element of celestial ether or fire, which by itself generates all things, is devoid of that bodily part which requires union with another for the work of procreation. By Saturn again they denoted that being who maintains the course and revolution of seasons and periods of time, et deity actually so designated in Greek, for Saturn's Greek name is Kronos, which is the same as chronos, a space of time. The Latin designation 'Saturn' on the other hand is due to the fact that he is 'saturated' or 'satiated with years' (anni); the fable is that he was in the habit of devouring his sons — meaning that Time devours the ages and gorges himself insatiably with the years that are past. Saturn was bound by Jove in order that Time's courses might not be unlimited, and that Jove might fetter him by the bonds of the stars. But Jupiter himself — the name means 'the helping father,' whom with a change of inflexion we style Jove, from iuvare 'to help'; the poets call him 'father of gods and men,' and our ancestors entitled him 'best and greatest,' putting the title 'best,' that is most beneficent, before that of 'greatest,' because universal beneficence is greater, or at least more lovable, than the possession of great wealth —
10. Plutarch, On Isis And Osiris, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

363d. that Typhon's flight from the battle was made on the back of an ass and lasted for seven days, and that after he had made his escape, he became the father of sons, Hierosolymus and Judaeus, are manifestly, as the very names show, attempting to drag Jewish traditions into the legend. Such, then, are the possible interpretations which these facts suggest. But now let us begin over again, and consider first the most perspicuous of those who have a reputation for expounding matters more philosophically. These men are like the Greeks who say that Cronus is but a figurative name for Chronus (Time), Hera for Air, and that the birth of Hephaestus symbolises the change of Air into Fire. And thus among the Egyptians such men say that Osiris is the Nile consorting with the Earth, which is Isis, and that the sea is Typhon into which the Nile discharges its waters and is lost to view and dissipated
11. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 5.6.36 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

12. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 5.24.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5.24.9. But the Zeus in the Council Chamber is of all the images of Zeus the one most likely to strike terror into the hearts of sinners. He is surnamed Oath-god, and in each hand he holds a thunderbolt. Beside this image it is the custom for athletes, their fathers and their brothers, as well as their trainers, to swear an oath upon slices of boar's flesh that in nothing will they sin against the Olympic games. The athletes take this further oath also, that for ten successive months they have strictly followed the regulations for training.
13. Anon., Schol.Ar.Av., 179



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aither Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
aletheia (truth) Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 6
allegoresis (allegorical interpretation) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
antaeus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
aristotle Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
augeas Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 49, 51
bacchylides Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 6
centaurs Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
chariot Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
chronos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93; Castagnoli and Ceccarelli, Greek Memories: Theories and Practices (2019) 6
cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
cosmology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
cosmos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
cronus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
earth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
etumos Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 49
eudemus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
euripides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
fire, in cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
games, olympic Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
gods as elements, names of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
heracles Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93; Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 49, 51
hieron Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 51
homer, in pindar Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 23, 49, 51
homer, personification of Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 23
iconography, of heracles and pelops at olympia Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
lapiths Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
light, as a cosmogonic deity Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
melissus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
messenger-figures, scout in seven muses in hesiods theogony Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 23
narrative Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
oenomaus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
olympia Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
orphic myths Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
pausanias Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
pelops Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 51
persian cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
pherecydes of syrus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
pindar Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
plutarch Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
poet-patron relationship Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 23, 49, 51
poseidon Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 51
praise Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 23, 49, 51
pythagoras Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
reciprocity, symmetry or parity in Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 23, 49
sacrifice, in general Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
sculpture, at olympia Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
simonides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
tantalus Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 51
thebes, theban Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
theogony of hieronymus and hellanicus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
time (in cosmogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93
truth, and poetry Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 23
truth, and reciprocity Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 51
truth, definitions of Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 23
xenia' Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 49
xenia Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 51
zeus, temple at olympia Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92
zeus Meister, Greek Praise Poetry and the Rhetoric of Divinity (2019) 92; Park, Reciprocity, Truth, and Gender in Pindar and Aeschylus (2023) 49, 51
μάγοι Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 93