Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9314
Philostratus The Athenian, Lives Of The Sophists, 1.25.541
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Euripides, Orestes, 1496 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Lysias, Orations, 19.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Anon., Rhetorica Ad Herennium, 3.11.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, The Arrangement of Words, 11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, The Arrangement of Words, 11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 32.94 (1st cent. CE

32.94.  Just as in the case of comedies and revues when the poets bring upon the scene a drunken Carion or a Davus, they do not arouse much laughter, yet the sight of a Heracles in that condition does seem comical, a Heracles who staggers and, as usually portrayed, is clad in womanish saffron; in much the same way also, if a populace of such size as yours warbles all through life or, it may be, plays charioteer without the horses, it becomes a disgrace and a laughing stock. Indeed this is precisely what Euripides says befell Heracles in his madness: Then striding to a car he thought was there, He stepped within its rails and dealt a blow, As if he held the goad within his hand.
7. New Testament, Acts, 21.37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21.37. As Paul was about to be brought into the barracks, he asked the commanding officer, "May I say something to you?"He said, "Do you know Greek?
8. New Testament, Philippians, 2.12 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.12. So then, my beloved, even as you have always obeyed, not only in my presence, but now much more in my absence, work out your own salvation with fear and trembling.
9. Plutarch, Demetrius, 6.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Demosthenes, 6.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 4.1.8-4.1.11, 11.1.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.1.8.  But just as the authority of the speaker carries greatest weight, if his undertaking of the case is free from all suspicion of meanness, personal spite or ambition, so also we shall derive some silent support from representing that we are weak, unprepared, and no match for the powerful talents arrayed against us, a frequent trick in the exordia of Messala. 4.1.9.  For men have a natural prejudice in favour of those who are struggling against difficulties, and a scrupulous judge is always specially ready to listen to an advocate whom he does not suspect to have designs on his integrity. Hence arose the tendency of ancient orators to pretend to conceal their eloquence, a practice exceedingly unlike the ostentation of our own times. 4.1.10.  It is also important to avoid giving the impression that we are abusive, maligt, proud or slanderous toward any individual or body of men, especially such as cannot be hurt without exciting the disapproval of the judges. 4.1.11.  As to the judge, it would be folly for me to warn speakers not to say or even hint anything against him, but for the fact that such things do occur. Our opponent's advocate will sometimes provide us with material for our exordium: we may speak of him in honorific terms, pretending to fear his eloquence and influence with a view to rendering them suspect to the judge, or occasionally, though very seldom, we may abuse him, as Asinius did in his speech on behalf of the heirs of Urbinia, where he includes among the proofs of the weakness of the plaintiff's case the fact that he has secured Labienus as his advocate. 11.1.15.  When, however, we are speaking of our own affairs or those of others, we must distinguish between the expedient and the becoming, while recognising that the majority of the points which we have to consider will fall under neither head. In the first place, then, all kinds of boasting are a mistake, above all, it is an error for an orator to praise his own eloquence, and, further, not merely wearies, but in the majority of cases disgusts the audience.
12. Suetonius, Augustus, 89.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  
14. Philostratus The Athenian, Lives of The Sophists, 1.21.520, 1.22.522, 1.23.527, 1.24.528-1.24.529, 1.25.534, 1.25.538-1.25.539, 1.25.542, 2.1.549, 2.1.559, 2.1.562, 2.5.574-2.5.575, 2.6.576, 2.8.580, 2.9.584-2.9.585, 2.10.589, 2.15.595, 2.20.601, 2.27.620 (2nd cent. CE

15. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 26.4 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actors, tragic Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
aelius aristides, p. Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
aeschines Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
aigospotamoi Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
alexander of aegae Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
alexander of seleucia Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
alexander the great Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
antonius polemo Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
archestratus (tragic poet), antaeus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
arginusai Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
artabazus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
arykanda (lycia), asia, province of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
athens city of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
augustus, and comedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
battle Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
callimachus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
cersobleptes Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
chaeremon (tragic poet), achilles Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
chaironeia Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
cilicia Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
cynegirus (brother of aeschylos) Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
darius the great Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
declamation Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
demosthenes Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
dionysius of miletus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
egypt Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
euripides, dramas by\n, archelaus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
euripides, dramas by\n, heracles Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
euripides, dramas by\n, orestes Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
freedom of speech (parrhesia) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
grammatici Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
greece (mainland) Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
hadrian Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 228
hadrian (emperor), and comedy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
hadrian of tyre Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
hadriana olympia Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 227, 228
herodes atticus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82; Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
homereion Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 227
hyperides Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
ionia Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
isaeos the syrian Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
isocrates Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
laodicea Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 227
leptines Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
lollianus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
map of rome see forma urbis romae of the world, marathon, battle of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
marcus aurelius (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
marcus of byzantium Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
megara Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
odysseus (hero) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
old comedy (attic), countering arrogance of elites Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
old comedy (attic), freedom of speech in Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
old comedy (attic) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
olympia (agones) Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 227
pamphylia Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
peisistratos Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
peloponnesian war Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
persian empire Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
persian war Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
philip ii Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
polemo, marcus antonius Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 227, 228
polemo of laodicea Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
pollux of naucratis Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
ptolemy of naucratis Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71
python ?leon of byzantium Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
rhetores Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 169
rhetoric, pauls use of Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 34
rhetorical delivery Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 34
rhetorical expectations' Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 219
scopelianus of clazomenae Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
sicilan war Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
smyrna Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 227, 228
socrates Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
solon Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
sparta Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
sphacteria Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
theatre Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 228
thessaly Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
varus of pamphylia (perge) Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
xenophon Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 82
xerxes Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 71, 82
zeus Capra and Floridi, Intervisuality: New Approaches to Greek Literature (2023) 227, 228