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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9250
Philo Of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 190


nanFor even an infinitely infinite number, being made of a continuation of other numbers, when dissolved must end in a unit: and again it must begin with a unit, being afterwards compounded so as to make an illimitable multitude; on which account those who have made the investigation of such matters their study, have not called the unit a number, but rather an element, and the beginning of number.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.5, 2.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.5. וַיִּקְרָא אֱלֹהִים לָאוֹר יוֹם וְלַחֹשֶׁךְ קָרָא לָיְלָה וַיְהִי־עֶרֶב וַיְהִי־בֹקֶר יוֹם אֶחָד׃ 2.8. וַיִּטַּע יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים גַּן־בְעֵדֶן מִקֶּדֶם וַיָּשֶׂם שָׁם אֶת־הָאָדָם אֲשֶׁר יָצָר׃ 1.5. And God called the light Day, and the darkness He called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, one day." 2.8. And the LORD God planted a garden eastward, in Eden; and there He put the man whom He had formed."
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 11, 113, 12-25, 27, 35, 45, 49-53, 69, 7-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. for reason proves that the father and creator has a care for that which has been created; for a father is anxious for the life of his children, and a workman aims at the duration of his works, and employs every device imaginable to ward off everything that is pernicious or injurious, and is desirous by every means in his power to provide everything which is useful or profitable for them. But with regard to that which has not been created, there is no feeling of interest as if it were his own in the breast of him who has not created it.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 39 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

39. But in my opinion and in that of my friends, death in the company of the pious would be preferable to life with the impious; for those who die in the company of the pious everlasting life will receive, but everlasting death will be the portion of those who live in the other way. XII.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 2.176-2.177 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.176. The solemn assembly on the occasion of the festival of the sheaf having such great privileges, is the prelude to another festival of still greater importance; for from this day the fiftieth day is reckoned, making up the sacred number of seven sevens, with the addition of a unit as a seal to the whole; and this festival, being that of the first fruits of the corn, has derived its name of pentecost from the number of fifty, (penteµkosto 2.177. We must disclose another reason. Its nature is wondrous and highly prized for numerous reasons including the fact that it consists of the most elemental and oldest of the things which are encased in substances, as the mathematicians tell us, the rightangled triangle. For its sides, which exist in lengths of three and four and five, combine to make up the sum twelve, the pattern of the zodiac cycle, the doubling of the most fecund number six which is the beginning of perfection since it is the sum of the same numbers of which it is also the Product.{23}{literally, "being the sum of its own parts to which it is equal." In mathematical notation: 1 + 2 + 3 = 6 = 1 x 2 x 3.} To the second power, it seems, they produce fifty, through the addition of 3 x 3 and 4 x 4 and 5 x 5. The result is that it is necessary to say that to the same degree that fifty is better than twelve, the second power is better than the first power.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. but the deliberate intention of the philosopher is at once displayed from the appellation given to them; for with strict regard to etymology, they are called therapeutae and therapeutrides, either because they process an art of medicine more excellent than that in general use in cities (for that only heals bodies, but the other heals souls which are under the mastery of terrible and almost incurable diseases, which pleasures and appetites, fears and griefs, and covetousness, and follies, and injustice, and all the rest of the innumerable multitude of other passions and vices, have inflicted upon them), or else because they have been instructed by nature and the sacred laws to serve the living God, who is superior to the good, and more simple than the one, and more ancient than the unit;
6. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Exodus, 2.68 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 140-142, 146, 156, 159-160, 165-172, 176, 181, 184, 187-188, 192-193, 196-197, 199, 201, 205-206, 209, 214, 226, 230-232, 235-236, 134 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

134. for, having taken it, he began to divide it thus: in the first instance, he made two divisions, the heavy and the light, separating that which was thick from that which was more subtle. After that, he again made a second division of each, dividing the subtle part into air and fire, and the denser portion into water and earth; and, first of all, he laid down those elements, which are perceptible by the outward senses, to be, as it were, the foundations of the world which is perceptible by the outward senses.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
creation Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 183
demiurge Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 183
god Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182, 183
image (εἰκών) Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182
intelligible, realm Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182
middle platonism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 183
monad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182, 183
moses Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182
neopythagoreanism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182
number, cardinal Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182
number, odd Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182
number, ordinal Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182
number Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182, 183
one-being, platonic, plotinian Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 183
philo of alexandria Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182, 183; Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 296
stoic, stoicism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 183
theology' Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 182
theology Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 183