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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9250
Philo Of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 156


nanAnd in teaching this they are not very wide of the mark, but they know that the art of God according to which he created all things, admitting neither any extraordinary intensity nor any relaxation; but always remaining the same, made every single existing thing perfection, the Creator employing all numbers and all the ideas which tend to perfection. XXXII.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Plato, Philebus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

26e. Soc. But we said there was, in addition to three classes, a fourth to be investigated. Let us do that together. See whether you think that everything which comes into being must necessarily come into being through a cause. Pro. Yes, I do; for how could it come into being apart from a cause? Soc. Does not the nature of that which makes or creates differ only in name from the cause, and may not the creative agent and the cause be properly considered one? Pro. Yes.
2. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

27c. Tim. Nay, as to that, Socrates, all men who possess even a small share of good sense call upon God always at the outset of every undertaking, be it small or great; we therefore who are purposing to deliver a discourse concerning the Universe, how it was created or haply is uncreate, must needs invoke Gods and Goddesses (if so be that we are not utterly demented), praying that all we say may be approved by them in the first place, and secondly by ourselves. Grant, then, that we have thus duly invoked the deities;
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 22-23, 30, 21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 102, 11-16, 168, 17-25, 27, 3, 35, 46, 69, 7-8, 89, 9-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. for reason proves that the father and creator has a care for that which has been created; for a father is anxious for the life of his children, and a workman aims at the duration of his works, and employs every device imaginable to ward off everything that is pernicious or injurious, and is desirous by every means in his power to provide everything which is useful or profitable for them. But with regard to that which has not been created, there is no feeling of interest as if it were his own in the breast of him who has not created it.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 4.187 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.187. for this is to act in imitation of God, since he also has the power to do either good or evil, but his inclination causes him only to do good. And the creation and arrangement of the world shows this, for he has summoned what had previously no being into existence, creating order out of disorder, and distinctive qualities out of things which had no such qualities, and similarities out of things dissimilar, and identity out of things which were different, and intercommunion and harmony out of things which had previously no communication nor agreement, and equality out of inequality, and light out of darkness; for he is always anxious to exert his beneficent powers in order to change whatever is disorderly from its present evil condition, and to transform it so as to bring it into a better state.XXXVI.
6. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Exodus, 2.68 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 140-142, 146, 159-160, 165-172, 176, 181, 184, 187-188, 190, 192-193, 196-197, 199, 201, 205-206, 209, 214, 226, 230-232, 235-236, 134 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

134. for, having taken it, he began to divide it thus: in the first instance, he made two divisions, the heavy and the light, separating that which was thick from that which was more subtle. After that, he again made a second division of each, dividing the subtle part into air and fire, and the denser portion into water and earth; and, first of all, he laid down those elements, which are perceptible by the outward senses, to be, as it were, the foundations of the world which is perceptible by the outward senses.
8. Origen, On First Principles, 2.9.1 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.9.1. But let us now return to the order of our proposed discussion, and behold the commencement of creation, so far as the understanding can behold the beginning of the creation of God. In that commencement, then, we are to suppose that God created so great a number of rational or intellectual creatures (or by whatever name they are to be called), which we have formerly termed understandings, as He foresaw would be sufficient. It is certain that He made them according to some definite number, predetermined by Himself: for it is not to be imagined, as some would have it, that creatures have not a limit, because where there is no limit there can neither be any comprehension nor any limitation. Now if this were the case, then certainly created things could neither be restrained nor administered by God. For, naturally, whatever is infinite will also be incomprehensible. Moreover, as Scripture says, God has arranged all things in number and measure; and therefore number will be correctly applied to rational creatures or understandings, that they may be so numerous as to admit of being arranged, governed, and controlled by God. But measure will be appropriately applied to a material body; and this measure, we are to believe, was created by God such as He knew would be sufficient for the adorning of the world. These, then, are the things which we are to believe were created by God in the beginning, i.e., before all things. And this, we think, is indicated even in that beginning which Moses has introduced in terms somewhat ambiguous, when he says, In the beginning God made the heaven and the earth. For it is certain that the firmament is not spoken of, nor the dry land, but that heaven and earth from which this present heaven and earth which we now see afterwards borrowed their names.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexandria Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
arithmetic Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174
arithmetical proportion Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174
arithmology Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174
becoming Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173
body, three-dimensional Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174, 181
chaldean (hebrew language) Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
chodollogomor, chosen father of sound Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
cosmology Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
creation Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
decad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174, 181
demiurge Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174
dialectic Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173
egypt, allegorical interpretation of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
egypt, sojourn in Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
etymologies, of abraham and abram Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
etymologies, of sarah Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
existence, pre-existence Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
fire, element Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174
geometric, objects Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173
geometric, proportion Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174
god Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
hebrew, and chaldean Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
intellect, triad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173
intelligible, realm Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173
irenaeus Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174
logos prophorikos, platonic/stoic concept' Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173
magnitude Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174
mathematics Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174
matter, sensible Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
monad Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
music Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174
nature Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174
neopythagoreanism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174
number, even Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
number, odd Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174, 181
number, perfect Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174, 181
number, pre-existence of Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
number Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174, 181
octave Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174
origen of alexandria Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 181
philo of alexandria Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174, 181; Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 296
plato Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174
pythagoras Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 174
sarah, as virtue Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
sarah, etymology of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
sensible, world Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173
sound, chosen father of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
specialists in physical philosophy Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
theology Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 173, 174, 181
νοῦς Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243
φυσικός Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 243