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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9251
Philo Of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 36


nanthey had a good right to oppose the contentious behaviour of some others, having means at hand by which to repel their enemies. But the former sort had no safety whatever. For what men could fight naked against armed enemies on equal terms, when, even if they had been both equally armed, the contest would still have been unequal?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 4.8, 9.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.8. וַיֹּאמֶר קַיִן אֶל־הֶבֶל אָחִיו וַיְהִי בִּהְיוֹתָם בַּשָּׂדֶה וַיָּקָם קַיִן אֶל־הֶבֶל אָחִיו וַיַּהַרְגֵהוּ׃ 4.8. And Cain spoke unto Abel his brother. And it came to pass, when they were in the field, that Cain rose up against Abel his brother, and slew him." 9.20. And Noah, the man of the land, began and planted a vineyard."
2. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 10.3 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3. But when an unrighteous man departed from her in his anger,he perished because in rage he slew his brother.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 47 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

47. Such was he who was the most virtuous of all the men of his age, and such were the rewards which were allotted to him which the holy scriptures enumerate; and the arrangement and classification of the aforesaid three, whether you call them men or dispositions of the soul, is very symmetrical, for the perfect man is entire from the beginning; but he who has his place changed is but half entire, having appropriated the earlier period of his life to wickedness, and the subsequent time to virtue to which he afterwards came over, and with which at that subsequent time he lived. But he who hopes, as his very name shows, has still a defect, for though he is always wishing for what is good, he is not as yet able to attain to it, but he is like those who are on a voyage, who while they are eager to reach the harbour, are still kept at sea without being able to anchor in port. X.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 52 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

52. Therefore is it seemly that the uncreated and unchangeable God should ever sow the ideas of immortal and virgin virtues in a woman who is transformed into the appearance of virginity? Why, then, O soul, since it is right for you to dwell as a virgin in the house of God, and to cleave to wisdom, do you stand aloof from these things, and rather embrace the outward sense, which makes you effeminate and pollutes you? Therefore, you shall bring forth an offspring altogether polluted and altogether destructive, the fratricidal and accursed Cain, a possession not to be sought after; for the name Cain being interpreted means possession. XVI. 52. But we must consider, with all the accuracy possible, each of these oracles separately, not looking upon any one of them as superfluous. Now the best beginning of all living beings is God, and of all virtues, piety. And we must, therefore, speak of these two principles in the first place. There is an error of no small importance which has taken possession of the greater portion of mankind concerning a subject which was likely by itself, or, at least, above all other subjects, to have been fixed with the greatest correctness and truth in the mind of every one;
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 100 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

100. for Moses," says the scripture, "having taken his own tent, fixed it outside the camp," and that too not near it, but a long way off, and at a great distance from the camp. And by these statements he tells us, figuratively, that the wise man is but a sojourner, and a person who leaves war and goes over to peace, and who passes from the mortal and disturbed camp to the undisturbed and peaceful and divine life of rational and happy souls. XXVI.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

60. for that is the work of the living; but Cain, that shameless man, that fratricide, is no where spoken of in the law as dying; but there is an oracle delivered respecting him in such words as these: "The Lord God put a mark upon Cain, as a sign that no one who found him should kill Him." Why so?
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 75 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

75. for which reason, though I admire him on account of the good fortune with which he was endowed by nature, I nevertheless blame the disposition in him that, when he was challenged to a contest of discussion, he came forward to contend, when he ought to have abided by his usual tranquillity, discarding all love for contention. But if he was determined by all means to enter into such a contest, then still he ought not to have engaged in it until he had sufficiently practised himself in the exercises of the art; for men who have been long versed in political strife are usually accustomed to get the better of men of uncultivated acuteness. XIV.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 68 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

68. For when the president, or superintendent, or father, or whatever we like to call him, of our composite body, right reason, is departed, having left the flock that is in us, it being neglected and suffered to go its own way, perishes and the loss to its master is great. But the irrational and wandering flock, being deprived of its shepherd, who ought to admonish and instruct it, strays away to a great distance from rational and immortal life. XX.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.144 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.144. But the men of this nation contribute their payments to the priests with joy and cheerfulness, anticipating the collectors, and cutting short the time allowed for making the contributions, and thinking that they are themselves receiving rather than giving; and so with words of blessing and thankfulness, they all, both men and women, bring their offerings at each of the seasons of the year, with a spontaneous cheerfulness, and readiness, and zeal, beyond all description.XXIX.
10. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 32 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

32. Now I think that it has already been sufficiently shown, that the field to which Cain invites Abel to come, is a symbol of strife and contention. And we must now proceed to raise the question what the matters are concerning which, when they have arrived in the plain, they are about to institute an investigation. It is surely plain that they are opposite and rival opinions: for Abel, who refers everything to God, is the God-loving opinion; and Cain, who refers everything to himself (for his name, being interpreted, means acquisition), is the self-loving opinion. And men are selfloving when, having stripped and gone into the arena with those who honour virtue, they never cease struggling against them with every kind of weapon, till they compel them to succumb, or else utterly destroy them;
11. New Testament, 1 John, 3.12, 3.15 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.12. unlike Cain, who was of the evil one, and killed his brother. Why did he kill him? Because his works were evil, and his brother's righteous. 3.15. Whoever hates his brother is a murderer, and you know that no murderer has eternal life remaining in him.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abel Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 208
afterlife, eschatological punishment Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 510
afterlife, reward Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 510
afterlife Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 510
alexander jannaeus Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 510
angel/angelic passim see also archangel, lord, of the Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 208
aristides quintilianus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
birth, cain, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 208
body, cain, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 208
cain, name of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 208
cain Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 208
food, association with wealth Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 510
herodotus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
imagery, athletics Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
josephus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
metaphorical language/use Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
nakedness Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 510
noah Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
passions Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
perfection Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
plato Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
proverb Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
ps.aristotle, de mundo Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
punishment of wrongdoers Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 510
sammael, father of cain, as the Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 208
sammael Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 208
soul Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
thucydides Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
training Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
virtue, acquisition of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
virtue, contest of' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 236
wealth/prosperity Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 510
wisdom Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 510