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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9251
Philo Of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 178


nanOr may we not suppose that this mark was set upon Cain to prevent his being slain, as a token that he would never be destroyed? For he has never once mentioned his death in the whole of the law, showing enigmatically that, like that fabulous monster Scylla, so also folly is an undying evil, which never entirely perishes, and yet which as to its capability of dying receives all time, and is never wholly free from death. And I would that the opposite event might happen, that all evils might be utterly eradicated, and might endure total destruction; but as it is they are constantly budding forth, and inflict an incurable disease on all who are once infected by them.Troubles in essay writing? Check out


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 4.12, 4.15, 9.20, 14.13-14.16, 15.10 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.12. כִּי תַעֲבֹד אֶת־הָאֲדָמָה לֹא־תֹסֵף תֵּת־כֹּחָהּ לָךְ נָע וָנָד תִּהְיֶה בָאָרֶץ׃ 4.15. וַיֹּאמֶר לוֹ יְהוָה לָכֵן כָּל־הֹרֵג קַיִן שִׁבְעָתַיִם יֻקָּם וַיָּשֶׂם יְהוָה לְקַיִן אוֹת לְבִלְתִּי הַכּוֹת־אֹתוֹ כָּל־מֹצְאוֹ׃ 14.13. וַיָּבֹא הַפָּלִיט וַיַּגֵּד לְאַבְרָם הָעִבְרִי וְהוּא שֹׁכֵן בְּאֵלֹנֵי מַמְרֵא הָאֱמֹרִי אֲחִי אֶשְׁכֹּל וַאֲחִי עָנֵר וְהֵם בַּעֲלֵי בְרִית־אַבְרָם׃ 14.14. וַיִּשְׁמַע אַבְרָם כִּי נִשְׁבָּה אָחִיו וַיָּרֶק אֶת־חֲנִיכָיו יְלִידֵי בֵיתוֹ שְׁמֹנָה עָשָׂר וּשְׁלֹשׁ מֵאוֹת וַיִּרְדֹּף עַד־דָּן׃ 14.15. וַיֵּחָלֵק עֲלֵיהֶם לַיְלָה הוּא וַעֲבָדָיו וַיַּכֵּם וַיִּרְדְּפֵם עַד־חוֹבָה אֲשֶׁר מִשְּׂמֹאל לְדַמָּשֶׂק׃ 14.16. וַיָּשֶׁב אֵת כָּל־הָרְכֻשׁ וְגַם אֶת־לוֹט אָחִיו וּרְכֻשׁוֹ הֵשִׁיב וְגַם אֶת־הַנָּשִׁים וְאֶת־הָעָם׃ 4.12. When thou tillest the ground, it shall not henceforth yield unto thee her strength; a fugitive and a wanderer shalt thou be in the earth.’" 4.15. And the LORD said unto him: ‘Therefore whosoever slayeth Cain, vengeance shall be taken on him sevenfold.’ And the LORD set a sign for Cain, lest any finding him should smite him." 9.20. And Noah, the man of the land, began and planted a vineyard." 14.13. And there came one that had escaped, and told Abram the Hebrew—now he dwelt by the terebinths of Mamre the Amorite, brother of Eshcol, and brother of Aner; and these were confederate with Abram." 14.14. And when Abram heard that his brother was taken captive, he led forth his trained men, born in his house, three hundred and eighteen, and pursued as far as Dan." 14.15. And he divided himself against them by night, he and his servants, and smote them, and pursued them unto Hobah, which is on the left hand of Damascus." 14.16. And he brought back all the goods, and also brought back his brother Lot, and his goods, and the women also, and the people." 15.10. And he took him all these, and divided them in the midst, and laid each half over against the other; but the birds divided he not."
2. Homer, Odyssey, 12.118 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 77 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

77. For, says he, the enemy has said, "I will pursue and take captive." Who, then, could be a more determined enemy to the soul than he who out of arrogance appropriate the especial attributes of the Deity to himself? Now it is an especial attribute of God to create, and this faculty it is impious to ascribe to any created being. 77. and as to these particular animals, they have indeed some reason for what they do, for they are the most domestic, and the most useful to life. The bull, as a plougher, draws furrows for the reception of the seed, and is again the most powerful of all animals to thresh the corn out when it is necessary to purify it of the chaff; the ram gives us the most beautiful garments for the coverings of our persons; for if our bodies were naked, they would easily be destroyed either through heat, or though intense cold, caused at one time by the blaze of the sun, and at another by the cooling of the air.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 3-4, 2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Those who are discontented at the constitution under which their fathers have lived, being always eager to blame and to accuse the laws, being impious men, use these and similar instances as foundations for their impiety, saying, "Are ye even now speaking boastfully concerning your precepts, as if they contained the rules of truth itself? For, behold, the books which you call the sacred scriptures do also contain fables, at which you are accustomed to laugh, when you hear others relating to them.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 156, 76, 136 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

60. Therefore he utters no fable whatever respecting the giants; but he wishes to set this fact before your eyes, that some men are born of the earth, and some are born of heaven, and some are born of God: those are born of the earth, who are hunters after the pleasures of the body, devoting themselves to the enjoyment and fruition of them, and being eager to provide themselves with all things that tend to each of them. Those again are born of heaven who are men of skill and science and devoted to learning; for the heavenly portion of us is our mind, and the mind of every one of those persons who are born of heaven studies the encyclical branches of education and every other art of every description, sharpening, and exercising, and practising itself, and rendering itself acute in all those matters which are the objects of intellect.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 76 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

76. For this reason also the allaccomplished Moss deprecates coming to a consideration of reasonable looking and plausible arguments, from the time that God began to cause the light of truth to shine upon him; through the immortal words of his knowledge and wisdom. But he is not the less led on to the contemplation of these arguments, not for the sake of becoming skilful in many things (for the contemplation of God himself and of his most sacred powers, are quite sufficient for a man who is fond of contemplation), but with a view to get the better of the sophists in Egypt, where fabulous and plausible inventions are looked upon as entitled to higher honour than a clear statement of truth.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. And when the ruler has appeared, then he in a still greater degree benefits his disciple and beholder, saying, "I am thy God;" for I should say to him, "What is there of all the things which form a part of creation of which thou art not the God?" But his word, which is his interpreter, will teach me that he is not at present speaking of the world, of which he is by all means the creator and the God, but about the souls of men, which he has thought worthy of a different kind of care;
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 165 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

165. But bulls, and rams, and goats, which Egypt holds in honour, and all other images of corruptible matter which, in report alone, are accounted God's, have no real existence, but are all fictitious and false; for those who look upon life as only a tragedy full of acts of arrogance and stories of love, impressing false ideas on the tender minds of young men, and using the ears as their ministers, into which they pour fabulous trifles, waste away and corrupt their minds, compelling them to look upon persons who were never even men in their minds, but always effeminate creatures as God's;
10. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 8, 68 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

68. For when the president, or superintendent, or father, or whatever we like to call him, of our composite body, right reason, is departed, having left the flock that is in us, it being neglected and suffered to go its own way, perishes and the loss to its master is great. But the irrational and wandering flock, being deprived of its shepherd, who ought to admonish and instruct it, strays away to a great distance from rational and immortal life. XX.
11. Philo of Alexandria, De Providentia, 2.40 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.79, 3.45 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.79. Now there are twelve tribes of the nation, and one of them having been selected from the others for its excellence has received the priesthood, receiving this honour as a reward for its virtue, and fidelity, and its devout soul, which it displayed when the multitude appeared to be running into sin, following the foolish choices of some persons who persuaded their countrymen to imitate the vanity of the Egyptians, and the pride of the nations of the land, who had invented fables about irrational animals, and especially about bulls, making gods of them. For this tribe did of its own accord go forth and slay all the leaders of this apostacy from the youth upwards, in which they appeared to have done a holy action, encountering thus a contest and a labour for the sake of piety.XVI. 3.45. And it is very likely that there may be other Pasipha's also, with passions equally unbridled, and that not women only, but men likewise may fall madly in love with animals, from whom, perhaps, indescribable monsters may be born, being memorials of the excessive pollution of men; owing to which, perhaps, those unnatural creations of unprecedented and fabulous monsters will exist, such as hippocentaurs and chimaeras, and other similar animals.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 2.271 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.271. at which Moses as very indigt, first of all, at all the people having thus suddenly become blind, which but a short time before had been the most sharp-sighted of all nations; and secondly, at a vain invention of fable being able to extinguish such exceeding brilliancy of truth, which even the sun in its eclipse or the whole company of the stars could never darken; for it is comprehended by its own light, appreciable by the intellect and incorporeal, in comparison of which the light, which is perceptible by the external senses, is like night if compared to day.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 237 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

237. We have heard of a most ancient tradition, which has been handed down throughout Greece by their historians, who have affirmed that the head of the Gorgon had such mighty power, that those who beheld it immediately became stones and rocks. But this appears only to be a fiction and fable, the truth being that great, and unexpected, and wonderful events do often bring after them great disaster; for instance, the anger of a master causes death, or calamities equivalent to death.
15. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.105 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.105. Accordingly God says, "In the day in which ye eat of it ye shall die the death." And yet, though they have eaten of it, they not only do not die, but they even beget children, and are the causes of life to other beings besides themselves. What, then, are we to say? Surely that death is of two kinds; the one being the death of the man, the other the peculiar death of the soul--now the death of the man is the separation of his soul from his body, but the death of the soul is the destruction of virtue and the admission of vice;
16. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 130-141, 146-148, 152-154, 157, 159-162, 170, 177, 185, 205, 224, 228, 125 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

125. If, therefore, any one is worthy to listen to the account of the creative power of God he is of necessity joyful, and rejoices in company with those who have had a longing to hear the same. And in the account of the creative power of God you will find no cunningly devised fable, but only unalloyed laws of truth firmly established. Moreover, you will find no vocal measures or rhythm, no melodies alluring the hearing with musical art; but only most perfect works of virtue, which have all of them a peculiar harmony and fitness. And as the mind rejoices which is eager to hear of the works of God, so also does language, which is in harmony with the conceptions of the mind, and which in a manner is compelled to attend to them, feel exultation. XXXIV.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abba of acco, rabbi Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 152
abel Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
abraham, humanity of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
abraham Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
adam Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
albert camus Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
alexander of aphrodisias Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
anatolius Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
angels Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
banishment Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
cain Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164; Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241; Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
camel, symbol of memory Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
charybdis Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
creation of the Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
cultivator Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
cumont, f. Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
decalogue Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
distinction Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
division Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
egypt, egyptians Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
elements Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
equality Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
exodus Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
figures of speech, hyperbole Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
figures of speech, rhetorical question Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
figures of speech, tautology Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
fratricide Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
god, creator Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
god, honour to Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
grief Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
hesiod Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
homer Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
humanity of abraham Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
idolatry Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
imagery, fountain Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
joy Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
justice Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
kingly power, allegorical interpretation of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
kingly power, lot omitted from allegory of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
kingly power, the kings, victory over Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
logos, tomeus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
logos of god Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
lot, capture of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
lot, omission of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
lydus, john Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
metaphorical language/use Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
moses Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 152
mount sinai Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
muses Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
myth, greek (pagan) Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
myth, jewish Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
myth Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
nobility Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
numbers, four Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
numbers, theory of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
overseer Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
passions, four Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
passions Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218; Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 395
philo, vocabulary Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
pindar Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
posidonius Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
ps.iamblichus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
pythagoreanism/pythagoreans/pythagorean Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238, 241
reason, in the victory over the kings Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
reason, senses controlled by Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
scylla Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
sennaar, and the passions Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
sennaar, the sodomite cities and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
sisyphus Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 164
sodom, the five senses and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
soul Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
stoa/stoic/stoicism Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
stobaeus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
terah Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 152
theon of smyrna Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
to the passions Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
virtues, cardinal Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 238
worker of the earth' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 218
zeus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 241
μῦθος Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 365
– as crucifixion Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 152
– greek and rabbinic Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 152
– iconography of Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 152
– in origen Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 152
– rabbinic exegesis of Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 152
– resolving textual contradictions Kattan Gribetz et al., Genesis Rabbah in Text and Context (2016) 152