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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9252
Philo Of Alexandria, That God Is Unchangeable, 141-143


nanNow to some persons this expression will seem to have been incorrectly used, and that the consistency with the context, and the truth of the fact will require that we should read rather that, "All flesh had corrupted its (auteµs) way upon the earth." For it does not agree with the feminine noun "flesh" (teµ sarki), if we subjoin a masculine case, the word autou in connection with it.


nanBut perhaps, Moses does not mean here to speak of the flesh alone as corrupting his way upon the earth, so that he deserves to be considered to have erred in the expression which he has used, but rather to speak of the things of the flesh, which is corrupted, and of that other being whose way the flesh endeavours to injure and to corrupt. So that we should explain this expression thus:ùAll flesh corrupted the perfect way of the everlasting and incorruptible being which conducts to God.


nanAnd know that this way is wisdom. For the mind being guided by wisdom, while the road is straight and level and easy, proceeds along it to the end; and the end of this road is the knowledge and understanding of God. But every companion of the flesh hates and repudiates, and endeavours to corrupt this way; for there is no one thing so much at variance with another, as knowledge is at variance with the pleasure of the flesh. Accordingly, the earthly Edom is always fighting with those who wish to proceed by this road


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 6.12, 9.20 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

6.12. וַיַּרְא אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וְהִנֵּה נִשְׁחָתָה כִּי־הִשְׁחִית כָּל־בָּשָׂר אֶת־דַּרְכּוֹ עַל־הָאָרֶץ׃ 6.12. And God saw the earth, and, behold, it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted their way upon the earth. ." 9.20. And Noah, the man of the land, began and planted a vineyard."
2. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 19.23 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

19.23. וְכִי־תָבֹאוּ אֶל־הָאָרֶץ וּנְטַעְתֶּם כָּל־עֵץ מַאֲכָל וַעֲרַלְתֶּם עָרְלָתוֹ אֶת־פִּרְיוֹ שָׁלֹשׁ שָׁנִים יִהְיֶה לָכֶם עֲרֵלִים לֹא יֵאָכֵל׃ 19.23. And when ye shall come into the land, and shall have planted all manner of trees for food, then ye shall count the fruit thereof as forbidden; three years shall it be as forbidden unto you; it shall not be eaten."
3. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 20.17 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

20.17. נַעְבְּרָה־נָּא בְאַרְצֶךָ לֹא נַעֲבֹר בְּשָׂדֶה וּבְכֶרֶם וְלֹא נִשְׁתֶּה מֵי בְאֵר דֶּרֶךְ הַמֶּלֶךְ נֵלֵךְ לֹא נִטֶּה יָמִין וּשְׂמֹאול עַד אֲשֶׁר־נַעֲבֹר גְּבוּלֶךָ׃ 20.17. Let us pass, I pray thee, through thy land; we will not pass through field or through vineyard, neither will we drink of the water of the wells; we will go along the king’s highway, we will not turn aside to the right hand nor to the left, until we have passed thy border.’"
4. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

109e. that by reason of feebleness and sluggishness, we are unable to attain to the upper surface of the air; for if anyone should come to the top of the air or should get wings and fly up, he could lift his head above it and see, as fishes lift their heads out of the water and see the things in our world, so he would see things in that upper world; and, if his nature were strong enough to bear the sight, he would recognize that that is the real heaven
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 11, 6, 8-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. By means of this husbandry, all the trees of the passions and vices, which soot forth and grow up to a height, bringing forth pernicious fruits, are rooted up, and cut down, and cleared away, so that not even the smallest fragment of them is left, from which any new shoots of evil actions can subsequently spring up.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 50 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 32-36, 31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

31. And if you ever to go a drinking party or to a costly entertainment, go with a good confidence; for you will put to shame the intemperate man by your own dexterity. For he, falling on his belly, and opening his insatiable desires even before he opens his mouth, will glut himself in a most shameless and indecorous manner, and will seize the things belonging to his neighbour, and will lick up everything without thinking. And when he is completely sated with eating, then drinking, as the poets say, with his mouth open, he will make himself an object for the laughter and ridicule of all those who behold him.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 161 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

161. for what wrestler could be compared in might with the strength of a bull or of an elephant? And what runner could put himself on a level with the speed of a hound or of a hare? And the most sharp-sighted of men is absolutely blind if his sight is compared with that of antelopes of eagles. Again, in hearing and in smell, often other animals are very far beyond man; as, for instance, the ass, which appears to be the stupidest of all animals, would show that our sense of hearing is very obtuse if he were brought into comparison with us. The dog, too, would make the nostrils in man appear a perfectly useless part from the exceeding superiority of the quickness of his own sense of smell; for, in him, that sense is pushed to such a degree that it almost equals the rapidity of the eye-sight. XLVII.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 47 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

47. Now, the irrational impulses of the mind, I mean those faculties which are developed in a misuse of that reason which should direct the choice, the sons of Laban, "when they had departed three days' Journey," paid great regard to; being thus under a symbol cut off from virtue for the whole period of their life; for time is capable of being divided into three parts, consisting of the past, and the present, and the future. But these animals which are irrational in the second sense, and which are destitute not only of right reason but of all reason whatever, under which class the brute beasts are reckoned, the practiser of contemplation will think worthy of all his care, considering that their errors have proceeded, not so much from deliberate wickedness as form ignorance, which was devoid of a guide.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.75 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.75. And it is easy otherwise by means of argument to perceive this, since God is the first light, "For the Lord is my light and my Saviour," is the language of the Psalms; and not only the light, but he is also the archetypal pattern of every other light, or rather he is more ancient and more sublime than even the archetypal model, though he is spoken of as the model; for the real model was his own most perfect word, the light, and he himself is like to no created thing.
11. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.87, 2.93 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Philo of Alexandria, That God Is Unchangeable, 140, 142-145, 15, 14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. And she says, that "she that had many children has become weak," speaking accurately and very plainly. For when the soul, although only one, brings forth many children when separated from the one, it then naturally becomes infinite in number; and then being weighed down and overwhelmed by the multitude of children who depend upon it, (and the greatest part of them are premature and abortive), it becomes weak.
13. New Testament, John, 1.9-1.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.9. The true light that enlightens everyone was coming into the world. 1.10. He was in the world, and the world was made through him, and the world didn't recognize him. 1.11. He came to his own, and those who were his own didn't receive him. 1.12. But as many as received him, to them he gave the right to become God's children, to those who believe in his name: 1.13. who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. 1.14. The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth. 1.15. John testified about him. He cried out, saying, "This was he of whom I said, 'He who comes after me has surpassed me, for he was before me.' 1.16. From his fullness we all received grace upon grace. 1.17. For the law was given through Moses. Grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. 1.18. No one has seen God at any time. The one and only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him.
14. Plutarch, Dialogue On Love, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschylus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
allegory / allegoresis Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
anthropology Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
apophatic Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
cleansing Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
dan Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
emendation Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 114
euripides Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
excellence, (moral) Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 214
faith Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
figures of speech, tricolon Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
flesh Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
genre Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
gluttony Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
god, good Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
god Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 114
heaven Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
hebrew bible Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 114
highway of virtue Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
imagery, bearing fruit Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 214
imagery, giving birth Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
incarnation Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
israel Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 214
john, gospel of Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
josephus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
kinship language/terms Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
light, true Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
logic Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
logos (λόγος) Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
metaphorical language, use of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
moses Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 114
negative theology Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
new testament Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
numbers, three Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
passions, freedom of/impassibility Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 214
passions, trees of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 214
passions Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
philo Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 114
philos colleagues Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 114
plato Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
pleasure Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
revelation Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
road of moral insight/virtue/wisdom Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 214
royse, j. Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
scholars, biblical Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 114
self-control, lack of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
self-control Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
snake Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
soul Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192; Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147
text criticism Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 114
thucydides, time, three parts of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 232
translators Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 114
vices, trees of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 214
virtue' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 192
λόγος Hirsch-Luipold, Plutarch and the New Testament in Their Religio-Philosophical Contexts (2022) 147