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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9249
Philo Of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 4.177
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 9.20, 26.2, 46.33-46.34 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

26.2. וַיֵּרָא אֵלָיו יְהוָה וַיֹּאמֶר אַל־תֵּרֵד מִצְרָיְמָה שְׁכֹן בָּאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר אֹמַר אֵלֶיךָ׃ 26.2. וַיָּרִיבוּ רֹעֵי גְרָר עִם־רֹעֵי יִצְחָק לֵאמֹר לָנוּ הַמָּיִם וַיִּקְרָא שֵׁם־הַבְּאֵר עֵשֶׂק כִּי הִתְעַשְּׂקוּ עִמּוֹ׃ 46.33. וְהָיָה כִּי־יִקְרָא לָכֶם פַּרְעֹה וְאָמַר מַה־מַּעֲשֵׂיכֶם׃ 46.34. וַאֲמַרְתֶּם אַנְשֵׁי מִקְנֶה הָיוּ עֲבָדֶיךָ מִנְּעוּרֵינוּ וְעַד־עַתָּה גַּם־אֲנַחְנוּ גַּם־אֲבֹתֵינוּ בַּעֲבוּר תֵּשְׁבוּ בְּאֶרֶץ גֹּשֶׁן כִּי־תוֹעֲבַת מִצְרַיִם כָּל־רֹעֵה צֹאן׃ 9.20. And Noah, the man of the land, began and planted a vineyard." 26.2. And the LORD appeared unto him, and said: ‘Go not down unto Egypt; dwell in the land which I shall tell thee of." 46.33. And it shall come to pass, when Pharaoh shall call you, and shall say: What is your occupation?" 46.34. that ye shall say: Thy servants have been keepers of cattle from our youth even until now, both we, and our fathers; that ye may dwell in the land of Goshen; for every shepherd is an abomination unto the Egyptians.’"
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 257, 256 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

256. For when Abraham had lost such a partner of his whole life, as our account has shown her to have been, and as the scriptures testify that she was, he still like a wrestler prevailed over the grief which attacked him and threatened to overwhelm his soul; strengthening and encouraging with great virtue and resolution, reason, the natural adversary of the passions, which indeed he had always taken as a counsellor during the whole of his life; but at this time above all others, he thought fit to be guided by it, when it was giving him the best and most expedient advice.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 177 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

177. At all events I have before now often seen in the theatre, when I have been there, some persons influenced by a melody of those who were exhibiting on the stage, whether dramatists or musicians, as to be excited and to join in the music, uttering encomiums without intending it; and I have seen others at the same time so unmoved that you would think there was not the least difference between them and the iimate seats on which they were sitting; and others again so disgusted that they have even gone away and quitted the spectacle, stopping their ears with their hands, lest some atom of a sound being left behind and still sounding in them should inflict annoyance on their morose and unpleasable souls.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 67 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

67. But the foolish man proceeds always by means of the two passions together, both anger and desire, omitting no opportunity, and discarding reason as his pilot and judge. But the man who is contrary to him has extirpated anger and desire from his nature, and has enlisted himself under divine reason as his guide; as also Moses, that faithful servant of God, did. Who, when he is offering the burnt offerings of the soul, "washes out the Belly;" that is to say, he washes out the whole seat of desires, and he takes away "the breast of the ram of the Consecration;" that is to say, that whole of the warlike disposition, that so the remainder, the better portion of the soul, the rational part, having no longer anything to draw it in a different direction or to counteract its natural impulses, may indulge its own free and noble inclinations towards everything that is beautiful;
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 165 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

165. But its juggleries and deceits pleasure does not venture to bring directly to the man, but first offers them to the woman, and by her means to the man; acting in a very natural and sagacious manner. For in human beings the mind occupies the rank of the man, and the sensations that of the woman. And pleasure joins itself to and associates itself with the sensations first of all, and then by their means cajoles also the mind, which is the domit part. For, after each of the senses have been subjected to the charms of pleasure, and has learnt to delight in what is offered to it, the sight being fascinated by varieties of colours and shapes, the hearing by harmonious sounds, the taste by the sweetness of flowers, and the smell by the delicious fragrance of the odours which are brought before it, these all having received these offerings, like handmaids, bring them to the mind as their master, leading with them persuasion as an advocate, to warn it against rejecting any of them whatever. And the mind being immediately caught by the bait, becomes a subject instead of a ruler, and a slave instead of a master, and an exile instead of a citizen, and a mortal instead of an immortal.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.21-1.24 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.21. And immediately he had all kinds of masters, one after another, some coming of their own accord from the neighbouring countries and the different districts of Egypt, and some being even procured from Greece by the temptation of large presents. But in a short time he surpassed all their knowledge, anticipating all their lessons by the excellent natural endowments of his own genius; so that everything in his case appeared to be a ecollecting rather than a learning, while he himself also, without any teacher, comprehended by his instinctive genius many difficult subjects; 1.22. for great abilities cut out for themselves many new roads to knowledge. And just as vigorous and healthy bodies which are active and quick in motion in all their parts, release their trainers from much care, giving them little or no trouble and anxiety, and as trees which are of a good sort, and which have a natural good growth, give no trouble to their cultivators, but grow finely and improve of themselves, so in the same manner the well disposed soul, going forward to meet the lessons which are imparted to it, is improved in reality by itself rather than by its teachers, and taking hold of some beginning or principle of knowledge, bounds, as the proverb has it, like a horse over the plain. 1.23. Accordingly he speedily learnt arithmetic, and geometry, and the whole science of rhythm and harmony and metre, and the whole of music, by means of the use of musical instruments, and by lectures on the different arts, and by explanations of each topic; and lessons on these subjects were given him by Egyptian philosophers, who also taught him the philosophy which is contained in symbols, which they exhibit in those sacred characters of hieroglyphics, as they are called, and also that philosophy which is conversant about that respect which they pay to animals which they invest with the honours due to God. And all the other branches of the encyclical education he learnt from Greeks; and the philosophers from the adjacent countries taught him Assyrian literature and the knowledge of the heavenly bodies so much studied by the Chaldaeans. 1.24. And this knowledge he derived also from the Egyptians, who study mathematics above all things, and he learnt with great accuracy the state of that art among both the Chaldaeans and Egyptians, making himself acquainted with the points in which they agree with and differ from each other--making himself master of all their disputes without encouraging any disputatious disposition in himself--but seeking the plain truth, since his mind was unable to admit any falsehood, as those are accustomed to do who contend violently for one particular side of a question; and who advocate any doctrine which is set before them, whatever it may be, not inquiring whether it deserves to be supported, but acting in the same manner as those lawyers who defend a cause for pay, and are wholly indifferent to the justice of their cause.
7. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.128-3.134, 3.140-3.147 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexandria Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; alternative ideals, though apatheia represents progress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
augustine, attack on stoic apatheia, misrepresents stoic acceptance of first movements as acceptance of emotion Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
body Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74; Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 157
egypt, egyptians Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74
egypt, symbol of passions/body Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 157
enkyklios paideia Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74
exodus Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74
frank, dan Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
happiness Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 157
israelites Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74
maimonides, jewish philosopher, apatheia and metriopatheia alternative ideals Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
moses, his education Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74
moses Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74
passions Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 157
pearce, sarah Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 157
pharaoh Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 157
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, apatheia and metriopatheia alternative ideals but apatheia is progress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
philosophy Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74
progressing Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
soul' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 157
theater Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 74
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385