Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9239
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 2.240


nanBut the law has enjoined fear, because children are accustomed to feel an easy indifference. For though parents attend to their children with an exceeding violence of affection, providing them with necessary things from all quarters, and bestowing all good things upon them, and shrinking from no labour and from no danger, being bound to them by love stronger than any oaths, still some persons do not receive their affection as if it aimed solely at their good, being full of luxury and arrogance; and coveting a luxurious life, and becoming effeminate both in body and soul, permitting them in no respect to entertain proper dispositions as through the native powers of their minds, which they are not ashamed to overthrow, and to enervate, and to deprive of each separate energy, and so they come not to fear their natural correctors, their fathers and mothers yielding to and indulging their own private passions and desires.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 6, 5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. for these men have been living and rational laws; and the lawgiver has magnified them for two reasons; first, because he was desirous to show that the injunctions which are thus given are not inconsistent with nature; and, secondly, that he might prove that it is not very difficult or laborious for those who wish to live according to the laws established in these books, since the earliest men easily and spontaneously obeyed the unwritten principle of legislation before any one of the particular laws were written down at all. So that a man may very properly say, that the written laws are nothing more than a memorial of the life of the ancients, tracing back in an antiquarian spirit, the actions and reasonings which they adopted;
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Joseph, 29-31, 28 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

28. It is worth while, however, after having thus explained the literal account given to us of these events, to proceed to explain also the figurative meaning concealed under that account; for we say that nearly all, or that at all events, the greater part of the history of the giving of the law is full of allegories; now the disposition which we have at present under consideration, is called by the Hebrews Joseph; but the name being interpreted in the Greek language means, "the addition of the Lord," a name most felicitously given, and most appropriate to the account given of the person so called; for the democratic constitution in vogue among states is an addition of nature which has sovereign authority over everything;
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

21. For two women live with each individual among us, both unfriendly and hostile to one another, filling the whole abode of the soul with envy, and jealousy, and contention; of these we love the one looking upon her as being mild and tractable, and very dear to and very closely connected with ourselves, and she is called pleasure; but the other we detest, deeming her unmanageable, savage, fierce, and most completely hostile, and her name is virtue. Accordingly, the one comes to us luxuriously dressed in the guise of a harlot and prostitute, with mincing steps, rolling her eyes about with excessive licentiousness and desire, by which baits she entraps the souls of the young, looking about with a mixture of boldness and impudence, holding up her head, and raising herself above her natural height, fawning and giggling, having the hair of her head dressed with most superfluous elaborateness, having her eyes pencilled, her eyebrows covered over, using incessant warm baths, painted with a fictitious colour, exquisitely dressed with costly garments, richly embroidered, adorned with armlets, and bracelets, and necklaces, and all other ornaments which can be made of gold, and precious stones, and all kinds of female decorations; loosely girdled, breathing of most fragrant perfumes, thinking the whole market her home; a marvel to be seen in the public roads, out of the scarcity of any genuine beauty, pursuing a bastard elegance.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.124, 1.126, 2.9, 2.53-2.55 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.124. Now no such person as this is a pupil of the sacred word, but those only are the disciples of that who are real genuine men, lovers of temperance, and orderliness, and modesty, men who have laid down continence, and frugality, and fortitude, as a kind of base and foundation for the whole of life; and safe stations for the soul, in which it may anchor without danger and without changeableness: for being superior to money, and pleasure, and glory, they look down upon meats and drinks, and everything of that sort, beyond what is necessary to ward off hunger: being thoroughly ready to undergo hunger, and thirst, and heat, and cold, and all other things, however hard they may be to be borne, for the sake of the acquisition of virtue. And being admirers of whatever is most easily provided, so as to not be ashamed of ever such cheap or shabby clothes, think rather, on the other hand, that sumptuous apparel is a reproach and great scandal to life. 1.126. Do you not see, that even now, also, the sacred historian represents the practiser of honourable pursuits, who abounds in all royal materials and appointments, as sleeping on the ground, and using a stone for his pillow; and a little further on, he speaks of himself as asking in his prayers for bread and a cloak, the necessary wealth of nature? like one who has at all times held in contempt, the man who dwells among vain opinions, and who is inclined to revile all those who are disposed to admire him; this man is the archetypal pattern of the soul which is devoted to the practice of virtue, and an enemy of every effeminate person. XXI. 2.9. Those then who have called only what is honourable good, have preserved this nature free from alloy, and have attributed it only to what is most excellent, namely to the reason that is in us; but those who have mixed it have combined it with three things, the soul, the body, and external circumstances. And they who act thus are persons of a somewhat effeminate and luxurious way of life, being bred up the greater part of their time, from their earliest infancy, in the women's apartments and among the effeminate race which is found in the women's apartments. But those who argue differently are men inclined to a harder regimen, being bred up from their boyhood among men, and being themselves men in their minds, embracing what is right in preference to what is pleasant, and devoting themselves to nourishment fit for athletes for the sake of strength and vigour, not of pleasure. 2.53. Who, therefore, thinks of costly purple garments? Who cares about transparent and thin summer robes? Who wishes for a garment delicate as a spider's web? Who is eager to have embroidered for him apparel flowered over with dyes and brocaded figures, by those who are skilful in sewing and weaving cunning embroidery, and are superior in their handwork to the imitative skill of the painter? Who, I say? Who, but vain opinion. VIII. 2.54. And, indeed, it is for the same reasons that we had need of houses, requiring them also for protection against the attacks of wild beasts, or of men more savage in their nature than even wild beasts. Why is it, then, that we adorn the pavements and floors with costly stones? And why do we travel over Asia, and Africa, and all Europe, and the islands, searching for pillars and capitals, and architraves, and selecting them with reference to their superior beauty? 2.55. And why are we anxious for, and why do we vie with one another in specimens of Doric, and Ionic, and Corinthian sculpture, and in all the refinements which luxurious men have devised in addition to the existing customs, adorning the capitals of their pillars? And why do we furnish our chambers for men and for women with golden ornaments? Is it not all from our being influenced by vain opinion?
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 2.1, 2.48, 2.241 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.1. In the treatise preceding this one we have discussed with accuracy two articles of the ten commandments, that which relates to not thinking that any other beings are absolute gods, except God himself; and the other which enjoins us not to worship as God any object made with hands. And we also spoke of the laws which relate specially to each of these points. But we will now proceed to discuss the three which come next in the regular order, again adapting suitable special laws to each. 2.48. But if men everywhere agreed with this small number, and became, as nature originally designed that they should, all blameless and irreproachable, lovers of wisdom, delighting in all that is virtuous and honourable, and thinking that and that alone good, and looking on everything else as subordinate and slaves, as if they themselves were the masters of them, then all the cities would be full of happiness, being wholly free from all the things which are the causes of pain or fear, and full of all those which produce joy and cheerfulness. So that no time would ever cease to be the time of a happy life, but that the whole circle of the year would be one festival.XIV. 2.241. But we must also urge on the parents of such persons that they employ more weighty and severe admonitions in order to cure this impetuous obstinacy of their children, and we must warn the children to reverence their parents, fearing them as their rulers and natural masters; for it is with difficulty even by these considerations that they will be brought to hesitate to act unjustly.XLIV.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

48. And perhaps some people may be inclined to approve of the arrangement of such entertainments which at present prevails everywhere, from an admiration of, and a desire of imitating, the luxury and extravagance of the Italians which both Greeks and barbarians emulate, making all their preparations with a view to show rather than to real enjoyment
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 168 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

168. But when Tiberius was dead, and Gaius succeeded to the empire, he then, following a new master, who invited him to every description of relaxation and luxury, such as could delight every one of his outward senses, said to himself: "Rise up, O Helicon! now is your opportunity. You have now an auditor, and a spectator, who is of all men in the world the best calculated to receive the exhibition of your talents favourably. You are a man of very attractive natural talents. You are able to joke graceful, and to say witty, things beyond any one else. You are skilful in all kinds of amusements, and trifling, and fashionable sports. And you are equally accomplished in those branches of the encyclical education which are not so ordinarily met with. Moreover, you have a readiness of speech and repartee which is far from unpleasing.
9. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 71, 95, 181 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

181. For the soul, being as some ancient writer has said, a waxen tablet, while it is hard and resisting, repels and refuses the impressions which are attempted to be stamped upon it; and remains of necessity undistinguished by any figure. But when it becomes tractable and yielding in a moderate degree, it then receives deep impressions, and having taken off the stamp given by the seal, it preserves accurately the appearances which are impressed upon it, so that they cannot be effaced. XXXVIII.
10. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 52 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

52. But as he who injures a good man is proved to be doing injury to himself, so also does he who thinks his betters worthy of privileges, in word indeed claim advantage for them, but in fact he is procuring it for himself. And nature here bears testimony in support of my argument, and so do all the laws which have been established in consistency with her; for there is a positive and express and intelligible command laid down in these words: "Honour thy father and thy mother, that it may be well with Thee;" not well with those who receive the honour, says the Scripture, but with thee; for if we look upon the intellect as the father of this concrete animal, and if we honour the outward senses as its mother, we ourselves shall be well treated by them.
11. Philo of Alexandria, That Every Good Person Is Free, 13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. And since, as that sweetest of all writers, Plato, says, envy is removed far from the divine company, but wisdom, that most divine and communicative of all things, never closes its school, but is continually open to receive all who thirst for salutary doctrines, to whom she pours forth the inexhaustible stream of unalloyed instruction and wisdom, and persuades them to yield to the intoxication of the soberest of all drunkenness.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
asceticism Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
athenaeus (author), formulae of expression Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
athenaeus (author), framing language Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
athenaeus (author), paraphrases original sources Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
athenaeus (author), primacy claimed in Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
athenaeus (author), superlatives in Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
athenaeus (author) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
campania/campanians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
clothing Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232, 394
colophon/colophonians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
cosmetics Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
creation Martens, One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law (2003) 75
deception Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
diction Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 119
dionysius of halicarnassus Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
drinking/drunkenness Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
envy/rivalry Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232, 394
flattery Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
historiography, roman Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
jewelry Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
jewish thought Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 119
law of nature, and stoicism Martens, One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law (2003) 75
law of nature, in philo Martens, One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law (2003) 75
miletus/milesians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
mosaic law, for ordinary people Martens, One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law (2003) 75
moses Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 119
music Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 119
nature, philos and stoics views of Martens, One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law (2003) 75
perfumes Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
persians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
philo, of alexandria Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 119
philo judaeus Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
physis, as ordering nature Martens, One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law (2003) 75
plato, phaedrus Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 119
pleasure Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
prostitutes/prostitution Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
reason, in philos view of nature' Martens, One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law (2003) 75
socrates Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 119
softness/weakness Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
stoics/stoicism, natural law Martens, One God, One Law: Philo of Alexandria on the Mosaic and Greco-Roman Law (2003) 75
style Tarrant et al, Brill's Companion to the Reception of Plato in Antiquity (2018) 119
sybaris, luxury/decadence at Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
sybaris Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
symposia/feasting Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
thessalians Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
virtue Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394
wealth/prosperity Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 232
women Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 394