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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9236
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices Of Cain And Abel, 121


nanThese then, to speak with strict propriety are the prices to be paid for the preserving and ransoming of the soul which is desirous of freedom. And may we not say that in this way a very necessary doctrine is brought forward? Namely that every wise man is a ransom for a worthless one, who would not be able to last for even a short time, if the wise man by the exertion of mercy and prudence did not take thought for his lasting; as a physician opposing himself to the infirmities of an invalid, and either rendering them slighter, or altogether removing them unless the disease comes on with irresistible violence, and surmounts all the ingenuity of medical skill.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 26 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

26. But we must not be ignorant that repentance occupies the second place only, next after perfection, just as the change from sickness to convalescence is inferior to perfect uninterrupted health. Therefore, that which is continuous and perfect in virtues is very near divine power, but that condition which is improvement advancing in process of time is the peculiar blessing of a welldisposed soul, which does not continue in its childish pursuits, but by more vigorous thoughts and inclinations, such as really become a man, seeks a tranquil steadiness of soul, and which attains to it by its conception of what is good. V.
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. And therefore it is enjoined to the priest and prophet, that is to say to reason, "to place the soul in front of God, with the head Uncovered," that is to say the soul must be laid bare as to its principal design, and the sentiments which it nourished must be revealed, in order that being brought before the judgment seat of the most accurate vision of the incorruptible God, it may be thoroughly examined as to all its concealed disguises, like a base coin, or, on the other hand, if it be found to be free from all participation in any kind of wickedness, it may wash away all the calumnies that have been uttered against its bringing him for a testimony to its purity, who is alone able to behold the soul naked. VI. 17. for they would see that he, who had given them a sufficiency of the means of life was now also giving them a means which should contribute to their living well; accordingly, to live at all required meat and drink which they found, though they had never prepared them; and towards living well, and in accordance with nature and decorum, they required laws and enactments, by which they were likely to be improved in their minds. V.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 52, 51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

51. And he calls Bethuel the father of Rebekkah. How, then, can the daughter of God, namely, wisdom, be properly called a father? is it because the name indeed of wisdom is feminine but the sex masculine? For indeed all the virtues bear the names of women, but have the powers and actions of full-grown men, since whatever is subsequent to God, even if it be the most ancient of all other things, still has only the second place when compared with that omnipotent Being, and appears not so much masculine as feminine, in accordance with its likeness to the other creatures; for as the male always has the precedence, the female falls short, and is inferior in rank.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 53 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

53. As, therefore, among men in general, that is to say, among those who propose to themselves many objects in life, the divine spirit does not remain, even though it may abide among them for a very short time, but it remains among one species of men alone, namely, among those who, having put off all the things of creation, and the inmost veil and covering of false opinion, come to God in their unconcealed and naked minds.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Joseph, 82 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.103, 2.138 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.103. For it would be mere folly that some men should be excluded from the priesthood by reason of the scars which exist on their bodies from ancient wounds, which are the emblem of misfortune indeed, but not of wickedness; but that those persons who, not at all out of necessity but from their own deliberate choice, have made a market of their beauty, when at last they slowly repent, should at once after leaving their lovers become united to priests, and should come from brothels and be admitted into the sacred precincts. For the scars and impressions of their old offences remain not the less in the souls of those who repent. 2.138. Secondly, it shows mercy and compassion on those who have been treated unjustly, whose burden of distress it lightens by giving them a share in grace and gift; for the double portion of the inheriting son was no less likely to please the mother, who will be encouraged by the kindness of the law, which did not permit her and her offspring to be totally overcome by their enemies.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 177, 144 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

144. And if any one should desire to dress flesh with milk, let him do so without incurring the double reproach of inhumanity and impiety. There are innumerable herds of cattle in every direction, and some are every day milked by the cowherds, or goatherds, or shepherds, since, indeed, the milk is the greatest source of profit to all breeders of stock, being partly used in a liquid state and partly allowed to coagulate and solidify, so as to make cheese. So that, as there is the greatest abundance of lambs, and kids, and all other kinds of animals, the man who seethes the flesh of any one of them in the milk of its own mother is exhibiting a terrible perversity of disposition, and exhibits himself as wholly destitute of that feeling which, of all others, is the most indispensable to, and most nearly akin to, a rational soul, namely, compassion. XXVII.
8. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.8, 2.53-2.54, 3.140-3.141, 3.143-3.144, 3.147 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 6.9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10. Cassian, Conferences, 5.3 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham, passivity of, in egypt Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
allegorical interpretation, reality and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
anger, anger natural or necessary among christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; alternative ideals, though apatheia represents progress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; clement of alexandria Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; for philo, repentance and pity Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; origen Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
appetite (epithumia), natural or necessary among certain christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
cassian, john, founder of monastery at monte cassino, some emotions natural Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
clement of alexandria, church father Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
climacus, christian ascetic, some emotions natural Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
egypt, allegorical interpretation of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
egypt, sojourn in Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
gluttony, natural or necessary among certain christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
gregory of nyssa, church father, apatheia an ideal, but metriopatheia can sometimes be apatheia in a secondary sense Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
isaiah the solitary, st, some emotions natural Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
logos Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
lust, natural or necessary among certain christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
maimonides, jewish philosopher, pride and anger excluded from both Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
marriage, allegorical interpretation of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; natural and/or necessary emotions Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; natural and/or necessary pleasures Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; natural thoughts Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; not all emotions acceptable Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; philo Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
natural, necessary, emotion Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
natural, necessary, pleasure Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
natural, necessary, thoughts Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
passivity, of abraham in egypt Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
passivity, of reason Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
philo, clement of alexandria, basil Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, apatheia and metriopatheia alternative ideals but apatheia is progress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, emotions helpful Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, pity valued and compatible with apatheia Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, repentance valued Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, some pleasures necessary Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
plato, some desires and pleasures necessary Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
pleasure, natural and/or necessary pleasures Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
progressing Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
ps.-makarios (makarios, desert father, mentor of evagrius) , some thoughts natural rather than bad' Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
reason, as female Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
reason, as passive Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
rüther, theodore Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
sarah, as sister Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
spanneut, michel Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
specialists in physical philosophy Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
theodoret, christian, some emotion necessary and useful Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
virtue, as active Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
virtue, maleness of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
ware, kallistos Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
λόγος Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
νοῦς Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
φυσικός Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245
ἀρετή Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 245