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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9221
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 180


nanWhen, therefore, you hear that Hagar was afflicted by Sarah, you must not suppose that any of those things befell her, which arise from rivalry and quarrels among women; for the question is not here about woman, but about minds; the one being practised in the branches of elementary instruction, and the other being devoted to the labours of virtue.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 16.1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

16.1. וְשָׂרַי אֵשֶׁת אַבְרָם לֹא יָלְדָה לוֹ וְלָהּ שִׁפְחָה מִצְרִית וּשְׁמָהּ הָגָר׃ 16.1. וַיֹּאמֶר לָהּ מַלְאַךְ יְהוָה הַרְבָּה אַרְבֶּה אֶת־זַרְעֵךְ וְלֹא יִסָּפֵר מֵרֹב׃ 16.1. Now Sarai Abram’s wife bore him no children; and she had a handmaid, an Egyptian, whose name was Hagar."
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 251 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

251. And that you may have no suspicion of any jealousy on my part, take, if you will, my own handmaid to wife; who is a slave indeed as to her body, but free and noble as to her mind; whose good qualities I have for a long time proved and experienced from the day when she was first introduced into my house, being an Egyptian by blood, and a Hebrew by deliberate choice.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 97 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

97. But, in the allegorical explanations of these statements, all that bears a fabulous appearance is got rid of in a moment, and the truth is discovered in a most evident manner. The serpent, then, which appeared to the woman, that is to life depending on the outward senses and on the flesh, we pronounce to have been pleasure, crawling forward with an indirect motion, full of innumerable wiles, unable to raise itself up, ever cast down on the ground, creeping only upon the good things of the earth, seeking lurking places in the body, burying itself in each of the outward senses as in pits or caverns, a plotter against man, designing destruction to a being better than itself, eager to kill with its poisonous but painless bite. But the brazen serpent, made by Moses, we explain as being the disposition opposite to pleasure, namely, patient endurance, on which account it is that he is represented as having made it of brass, which is a very strong material.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 3-4, 51, 7-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Why then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV. 10. He also considered this point, in the second place, that it is indispensable that the soul of the man who is about to receive sacred laws should be thoroughly cleansed and purified from all stains, however difficult to be washed out, which the promiscuous multitude of mixed men from all quarters has impregnated cities with;
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 10-13, 139, 14, 141, 15, 154, 16-27, 34-44, 48-49, 5, 50-51, 53, 56-58, 61, 63, 65, 74-76, 9, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. But Sarah the wife of Abraham had not borne him any child. And she had an Egyptian handmaiden, who name was Hagar. And Sarah said unto Abraham, Behold, the Lord has closed me up, so that I should not bear children; go in unto my handmaiden that thou mayest have children by Her.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 61-62, 77-80, 255 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

255. But nevertheless, she is thought worthy of such an honourable reception from the prince, that her womb is opened by him, so as to receive the seed of divine generation, in order to cause the production of honourable pursuits and actions. Learn therefore, O soul, that Sarrah, that is, virtue, will bring forth to thee a son; and that Hagar, or intermediate instruction, is not the only one who will do so; for her offspring is one which has its knowledge from teaching, but the offspring of the other is entirely self-taught.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 157 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

157. And these things are not mere fabulous inventions, in which the race of poets and sophists delights, but are rather types shadowing forth some allegorical truth, according to some mystical explanation. And any one who follows a reasonable train of conjecture, will say with great propriety, that the aforesaid serpent is the symbol of pleasure, because in the first place he is destitute of feet, and crawls on his belly with his face downwards. In the second place, because he uses lumps of clay for food. Thirdly, because he bears poison in his teeth, by which it is his nature to kill those who are bitten by him.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Sobriety, 9, 8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.240 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.240. Do you not see that encyclical instruction, that is, Hagar, says to the angel, "Art thou God who seest Me?" for she was not capable of beholding the most ancient cause, inasmuch as she was by birth a native of Egypt. But now the mind begins to be improved, so as to be able to contemplate the governor of all the powers;
10. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.244 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 4.199, 4.201, 4.203 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.199. 5. When you have possessed yourselves of the land of Canaan, and have leisure to enjoy the good things of it, and when you have afterward determined to build cities, if you will do what is pleasing to God, you will have a secure state of happiness. 4.201. Let the ascent to it be not by steps but by an acclivity of raised earth. And let there be neither an altar nor a temple in any other city; for God is but one, and the nation of the Hebrews is but one. 4.203. 7. Let those that live as remote as the bounds of the land which the Hebrews shall possess, come to that city where the temple shall be, and this three times in a year, that they may give thanks to God for his former benefits, and may entreat him for those they shall want hereafter; and let them, by this means, maintain a friendly correspondence with one another by such meetings and feastings together
12. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.3. I have proposed to myself, for the sake of such as live under the government of the Romans, to translate those books into the Greek tongue, which I formerly composed in the language of our country, and sent to the Upper Barbarians; I, Joseph, the son of Matthias, by birth a Hebrew, a priest also, and one who at first fought against the Romans myself, and was forced to be present at what was done afterward [am the author of this work]. 1.3. 12. I have comprehended all these things in seven books, and have left no occasion for complaint or accusation to such as have been acquainted with this war; and I have written it down for the sake of those that love truth, but not for those that please themselves [with fictitious relations]. And I will begin my account of these things with what I call my First Chapter. 1.3. When Antigonus heard of this, he sent some of his party with orders to hinder, and lay ambushes for these collectors of corn. This command was obeyed, and a great multitude of armed men were gathered together about Jericho, and lay upon the mountains, to watch those that brought the provisions.
13. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 3.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.2. I fed you with milk, not withmeat; for you weren't yet ready. Indeed, not even now are you ready
14. New Testament, Galatians, 4.21-4.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.21. Tell me, you that desire to be under the law, don't you listen to thelaw? 4.22. For it is written that Abraham had two sons, one by thehandmaid, and one by the free woman. 4.23. However, the son by thehandmaid was born according to the flesh, but the son by the free womanwas born through promise. 4.24. These things contain an allegory, forthese are two covets. One is from Mount Sinai, bearing children tobondage, which is Hagar. 4.25. For this Hagar is Mount Sinai inArabia, and answers to the Jerusalem that exists now, for she is inbondage with her children. 4.26. But the Jerusalem that is above isfree, which is the mother of us all. 4.27. For it is written,"Rejoice, you barren who don't bear. Break forth and shout, you that don't travail. For more are the children of the desolate than of her who has a husband. 4.28. Now we, brothers, as Isaac was, are children of promise. 4.29. But as then, he who was born according to the flesh persecutedhim who was born according to the Spirit, so also it is now. 4.30. However what does the Scripture say? "Throw out the handmaid and herson, for the son of the handmaid will not inherit with the son of thefree woman. 4.31. So then, brothers, we are not children of ahandmaid, but of the free woman.
15. New Testament, Hebrews, 5.12-5.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.12. For when by reason of the time you ought to be teachers, you again need to have someone teach you the rudiments of the first principles of the oracles of God. You have come to need milk, and not solid food. 5.13. For everyone who lives on milk is not experienced in the word of righteousness, for he is a baby.
16. Tertullian, Apology, 46.18 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157; Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 151
adam Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 94
allegory Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 94, 151
egypt Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157
egyptians Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157
essenes Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 208
eve Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 94
hagar Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157; Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 94, 151
isaac Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157
isaksson,abel Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 208
ishmael Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157
jews,hebrews (in the tripartite tractate)' Dunderberg (2008), Beyond Gnosticism: Myth, Lifestyle, and Society in the School of Valentinus. 266
jews/judeans/ioudaioi,and ethnicity in philo Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157
misogyny Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 208
myth Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 94
neusner,jacob Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 208
paideia/greek education Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157
philo Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157
qumran Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 208
sarah Gruen (2020), Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter, 157; Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 94, 151
vermes,g. Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 208
virginity Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 151
wisdom Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 151