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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9221
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 144


nanFor the same relation that the mind bears to the outward sense, that same does science bear towards art; for, as has been said before, the soul is as it were the outward sense of the outward sense; therefore each of them has attracted to itself some slight things of nature, concerning which it labours and occupies itself, geometry having appropriated lines, and music sounds, and philosophy the whole nature of existing things. For this world is its subject matter, and so is the whole essence, both visible and invisible, of existing things.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 144 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

144. What then is this hidden meaning? Those who, as it were, attribute many fathers to existing things, and who represent the company of the gods as numerous, displaying great ignorance of the nature of things and causing great confusion, and making pleasure the proper object of the soul, are those who are, if we must tell the plain truth, spoken of as the builders of the aforesaid city, and of the citadel in it; having increased the efficient causes of the desired end, building them up like houses, being, as I imagine, in no respect different from the children of the harlot whom the law expels from the assembly of God, where it says, "The offspring of a harlot shall not come into the assembly of the Lord." Because, like archers shooting at random at many objects, and not aiming skilfully or successfully at any one mark, so these men, putting forward ten thousand principles and causes for the creation of the universe, every one of which is false, display a perfect ignorance of the one Creator and Father of all things;
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 140-142, 145, 15-18, 39-43, 71-88, 14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Therefore," says she, "go thou in to my handmaiden," that is to say, to the intermediate instruction of the intermediate and encyclical branches of knowledge, "that you may first have children by her;" for hereafter you shall be able to enjoy a connection with her mistress, tending to the procreation of legitimate children.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 107, 109-110, 18, 65-76, 106 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

106. And he means, as it appears to me, by this expression, everything in the world, the heaven, the earth, the water, the air, and all animals, and all plants. For to every one of them, he who directs all the energies of his soul towards God, and who looks to him alone as the only source form which he can hope for advantage, may fitly say--I will take nothing that is yours; I will not receive from the sun the light of day, nor by night will I receive light from the moon or from the other stars, nor rain from the air and from the clouds, nor meat and drink from the earth and from the water, nor the power of sight from the eyes, nor the faculty of hearing from the ears, nor that of smelling from the nostrils, nor from the palate in the mouth the sense of taste, nor the faculty of speaking from the tongue, nor the power of giving and taking from the hands, nor that of approaching and of retreating from the feet, nor that of breathing from the lungs, nor that of digesting from the liver, nor from the other internal organs of the body the power of exciting the energies which belong to them, nor the yearly produce from trees and seeds; but I will look upon every thing as proceeding from the only wise God, who extends his own beneficial powers in every direction, and who by their agency benefits me. XXVIII.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 184-186, 198-207, 181 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

181. but he differs from them widely in their opinion of God, not intimating that either the world itself, or the soul of the world, is the original God, nor that the stars or their motions are the primary causes of the events which happen among men; but he teaches that this universe is held together by invisible powers, which the Creator has spread from the extreme borders of the earth to heaven, making a beautiful provision to prevent what he has joined together from being dissolved; for the indissoluble chains which bind the universe are his powers.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 10, 15, 2, 201, 205, 208-209, 3-9, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. Abraham was ninety and nine years old; and the Lord appeared unto Abraham, and said unto him, I am thy God." The number of nine, when added to the number ninety, is very near to a hundred; in which number the self-taught race shone forth, namely Isaac, the most excellent joy of all enjoyments; for he was born when his father was a hundred years old.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 166, 165 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

165. But bulls, and rams, and goats, which Egypt holds in honour, and all other images of corruptible matter which, in report alone, are accounted God's, have no real existence, but are all fictitious and false; for those who look upon life as only a tragedy full of acts of arrogance and stories of love, impressing false ideas on the tender minds of young men, and using the ears as their ministers, into which they pour fabulous trifles, waste away and corrupt their minds, compelling them to look upon persons who were never even men in their minds, but always effeminate creatures as God's;
7. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.73-1.74, 2.34-2.35 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.73. And do not wonder if, according to the rules of allegorical description, the sun is likened to the Father and Governor of the universe; for in reality nothing is like unto God; but those things which by the vain opinion of men are thought to be so, are only two things, one invisible and the other visible; the soul being the invisible thing, and the sun the visible one. 2.34. Simeon is an emblem of learning, for his name being interpreted means, "listening." Levi is a symbol of virtuous energies and actions, and of holy ministrations. Judas is an emblem of songs and hymns addressed to God. Issachar, of wages which are given for good work; but perhaps the works themselves are their own perfect reward. Zabulon is a symbol of light, since his name means the departure of night; and when the night departs and leaves us, then of necessity light arises. 2.35. Dan is a symbol of the distinction between, and division of, different things. Gad is an emblem of the invasion of pirates, and of a counter attack made upon them. Asser is a symbol of natural wealth, for his name being interpreted, signifies "a calling blessed," since wealth is accounted a blessed possession.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.23-1.25 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.23. And, besides this distinct prohibition, there is another meaning which appears to me to be intended to be figuratively conveyed under these words, which is one of very great influence as contributing to the formation of the moral character, and which convicts in no slight degree those who are covetous of money and who seek to procure silver and gold from all quarters, and when they have acquired it treasure it up, as though it were some divine image, in their inmost shrines, looking upon it as the cause of all good things and of all happiness. 1.24. And all the poor men that are possessed of that terrible disease, the love of money, but who, from not having any riches of their own which they can think worthy of their attention, fix their admiration on the wealth of their neighbours, and, for the purpose of offering adoration to it, come the first thing in the morning to the houses of those who have abundance, as if they were noble temples at which they were going to offer prayers, and to entreat blessings from their owners as if from the gods. 1.25. And to these men, Moses says, in another passage, "You shall not follow images, and you shall not make to yourselves molten Gods."{5}{#le 19:4.} Teaching them, by figurative language, that it is not right to pay such honours to wealth as one would pay to the gods; for those celebrated materials of wealth, silver and gold, are made to be used, which, however, the multitude follows, looking upon them as the only causes of wealth which is proverbially called blind, and the especial sources of happiness.
9. Philo of Alexandria, That God Is Unchangeable, 89, 87 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

87. of the former species we have a conspicuous example afforded us in the injunctions given about the great vow.19 Now a vow is a request for good things from God; and the spirit of the great vow is to believe that God himself is the cause of good things from himself, without anyone else ever co-operating with him, of the things which may appear to be beneficial, neither the earth as fruitful, nor the rain as helping to promote the growth of seeds and plants, nor the air as calculated to nourish man, nor agriculture as the cause of production, nor the skill of the physician as the cause of health, nor marriage as the cause of the procreation of children:


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 400
alexandria Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 400
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145, 316, 570
allegory/allegoresis, present tense in Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145
antiochus of ascalon Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 144
arithmology, seven Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 400
body, bodies Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
chaldeans Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
cosmos Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
deity, cult statues of Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
deity, deities Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
education Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145
ephraim Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 316
etymology, greek Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 144
etymology Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 144
hagar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145, 400, 570
heavenly bodies Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
idolatry Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145, 570
ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145, 316
jacob, practicer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 316
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 316
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145
logos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 144
manasseh Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 316
memory Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 316
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 400
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 316
philo of alexandria, on cult statues Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
philo of alexandria, on heavenly bodies Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
philo of alexandria Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
platonism, platonists Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 144, 145, 316, 400
preliminary studies Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145, 570
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 570
reuben Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 316
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145, 570
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 400
simeon Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 316
sodom and gomorrah Gunderson, The Social Worlds of Ancient Jews and Christians: Essays in Honor of L. Michael White (2022) 28
soul, eye of the Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 144, 145
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145
virtue, specific/generic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 400
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 145, 316
wisdom' Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 144
wisdom Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 400