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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9221
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 125


nanWho then is he who is fond of investigating, and desirous of learning, and who thinks it not right to leave any of those things which are disguised or concealed unconsidered and examined? Who is he, I say, but the chief captain and king, he who abides and rejoices in the agreements which he has made with God, by name Judah? For says the scripture, "He turned aside out of his road to her, and said unto her, Suffer me to come in unto thee," (but he was not inclined to offer her any violence), and to see what is that power which is thus veiled, and for what purpose it is thus adorned;


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "29.31" "29.31" "29 31"\n1 16.1 16.1 16 1 \n2 16.2 16.2 16 2 \n3 21.12 21.12 21 12 \n4 29.27 29.27 29 27 \n5 29.28 29.28 29 28 \n6 3.18 3.18 3 18 \n7 38.15 38.15 38 15 \n8 38.16 38.16 38 16 \n9 38.17 38.17 38 17 \n10 38.18 38.18 38 18 \n11 38.19 38.19 38 19 \n12 38.20 38.20 38 20 \n13 38.21 38.21 38 21 \n14 38.22 38.22 38 22 \n15 38.23 38.23 38 23 \n16 38.24 38.24 38 24 \n17 38.25 38.25 38 25 \n18 38.26 38.26 38 26 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 19.25 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

19.25. וּבַשָּׁנָה הַחֲמִישִׁת תֹּאכְלוּ אֶת־פִּרְיוֹ לְהוֹסִיף לָכֶם תְּבוּאָתוֹ אֲנִי יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵיכֶם׃ 19.25. But in the fifth year may ye eat of the fruit thereof, that it may yield unto you more richly the increase thereof: I am the LORD your God."
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 3-4, 40-41, 5, 51, 6-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Why then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV. 10. He also considered this point, in the second place, that it is indispensable that the soul of the man who is about to receive sacred laws should be thoroughly cleansed and purified from all stains, however difficult to be washed out, which the promiscuous multitude of mixed men from all quarters has impregnated cities with;
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 10-12, 124, 13-18, 180, 19, 2, 20-27, 3, 31-39, 4, 40-44, 48-49, 5, 50-51, 53, 56-58, 6, 61, 63, 65, 7-9, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. But Sarah the wife of Abraham had not borne him any child. And she had an Egyptian handmaiden, who name was Hagar. And Sarah said unto Abraham, Behold, the Lord has closed me up, so that I should not bear children; go in unto my handmaiden that thou mayest have children by Her.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 49 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

49. And, on this account, the lovers of virtue and excellence do not approach the doors of the older philosophy before they have become familiar with these younger parts of it, grammar, and geometry, and the whole range of encyclical learning; for these subordinate branches do always attend upon those, who with sincerity and purity of purpose court wisdom.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 150-156, 149 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

149. Nor does he, who is sent forth to search for that virtue which is invincible and embittered against the ridiculous pursuits of men, by name Tamar, find her. And this failure of his is strictly in accordance with nature; for we read in the scripture, "And Judah sent a kid in the hands of his shepherd, the Adullamite, to receive back his pledge from the woman, and he found her not: and he asked the men of the place, Where is the harlot who was in Ae by the wayside? and they said, There is no harlot in this place. And he returned back to Judah, and said unto him, I have not found her, and the men of the place say that there is no harlot there. And Judah said, Let her keep the things, only let me not be made a laughing-stock, I because I have sent the kid, and you because you have not found Her." Oh, the admirable trial! oh, the temptation becoming sacred things!
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 131-136, 139, 143-144, 147, 152, 61-62, 77-80, 130 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

130. Having now discussed at sufficient length the subject of change and alteration of names, we will turn to the matters which come next in order in our proposed examination. Immediately after the events which we have just mentioned, came the birth of Isaac; for after God had given to his mother the name of Sarrah instead of Sarah, he said to Abraham, "I will give unto thee a Son." We must consider each of the things here indicated particularly.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 26 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

26. When the other woman heard these words (for she was standing in a place where she was out of sight but still within hearing), fearing lest the mind, without being aware of it, might be led captive and be enslaved, and so be carried away by so many gifts and promises, yielding also to the tempter in that she was arrayed so as to win over the sight, and was equipped with great variety of ingenuity for the purposes of deceit; for by all her necklaces and other appendages, and by her different allurements, she spurred on and charmed her beholders, and excited a wonderful desire within them; she in her turn came forward, and appeared on a sudden, displaying all the qualities of a native, free-born, and lady-like woman, such as a firm step, a very gentle look, the native colour of modesty and nature without any alloy or disguise, an honest disposition, a genuine and sincere way of life, a plain, honest opinion, an language removed from all insincerity, the truest possible image of a sound and honest heart, a disposition averse to pretence, a quiet unobtrusive gait, a moderate style of dress, and the ornaments of prudence and virtue, more precious than any gold.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 3.169, 3.172 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.169. Market places, and council chambers, and courts of justice, and large companies and assemblies of numerous crowds, and a life in the open air full of arguments and actions relating to war and peace, are suited to men; but taking care of the house and remaining at home are the proper duties of women; the virgins having their apartments in the centre of the house within the innermost doors, and the full-grown women not going beyond the vestibule and outer courts; 3.172. But when men are abusing one another or fighting, for women to venture to run out under pretence of assisting or defending them, is a blameable action and one of no slight shamelessness, since even, in the times of war and of military expeditions, and of dangers to their whole native land, the law does not choose that they should be enrolled as its defenders; looking at what is becoming, which it thinks desirable to preserve unchangeable at all times and in all places, thinking that this very thing is of itself better than victory, or then freedom, or than any kind of success and prosperity.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

21. And, in the same manner, having also equipped the woman in the ornaments suited to her, the law prohibits her from assuming the dress of a man, keeping at a distance men-women just as much as it does women-men; for the lawgiver was well aware that when only one single thing in the proper economy of the house was removed, nothing else would remain in the same position as it ought and as it was in before. V.
11. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.80, 1.82, 3.217-3.219, 3.223-3.224, 3.244 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.80. And may not they be Judah and Issachar? For the man who puts in practice the prudence of God confesses himself to be bound to feel gratitude, and to feel it towards him who has given him what is good without grudging; and he also does honourable and virtuous actions. Accordingly Judah is the symbol of a man who makes this confession "in respect of whom Leah ceased from child-Bearing." But Issachar is the symbol of the man who does good actions, "For he put Forth his shoulder to labour and became a man tilling the earth." With respect to whom Moses says, hire is in his soul after he has been sown and planted, so that his labour is not imperfect, but is rather crowned and honoured with a reward by God. 1.82. Why then as he had called the sapphire the green stone, did he not also speak of the red stone? Because Judah, as the type of a disposition inclined to confession, is a being immaterial and incorporeal. For the very name of confession (exomologeæseoæs) shows that it is a thing external to (ektos) himself. For when the mind is beside itself, and bears itself upward to God, as the laughter of Isaac did, then it makes a confession to him who alone has a real being. But as long as it considers itself as the cause of something, it is a long way from yielding to God, and confession to him. For this very act of confessing ought to be considered as being the work not of the soul, but of God who teaches it this feeling of gratitude. Accordingly Judah, who practises confession, is an immaterial being.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 150, 151, 166
adam Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 150
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
allegory Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 150, 151
christ Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
clement of alexandria Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
cyril of alexandria Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
didymus the blind Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
doutreleau, l. Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
eve Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 150, 166
hagar Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151, 166
harlot Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 206
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 166
issachar Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
jacob Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 166
judah Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
laban Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 166
leah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386; Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 166
numbers, five Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
numbers, theory of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
origen Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
paideia Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 166
rachel Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 166
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 150, 151, 166
senses, five Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
septuagint Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 166
stoa/stoic/stoicism Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
tamar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 206
thanksgiving' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 249
therapeutac Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 206
virginity Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 150, 206
wisdom Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151, 166
zipporah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386