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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9232
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Posterity Of Cain, 53


nanNow of such a city as this, every impious man is found to be a builder in his own miserable soul, until God deliberately causes complete and great confusion to their sophistical Arts. And this will be, when not only "they build a city and tower, the head of which will reach to heaven," that is to say, [...] the mind or the reason of each individual as conversant about making great works, which they represent as having for its head a conception peculiar to itself, which is called in symbolical language heaven. For it is plain that the head and object of every reasoning must be the aforesaid mind; for the sake of which, long digressions and sentences are in the habit of being used by men who write histories. XVI.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 4.8, 4.14, 15.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.8. וַיֹּאמֶר קַיִן אֶל־הֶבֶל אָחִיו וַיְהִי בִּהְיוֹתָם בַּשָּׂדֶה וַיָּקָם קַיִן אֶל־הֶבֶל אָחִיו וַיַּהַרְגֵהוּ׃ 4.14. הֵן גֵּרַשְׁתָּ אֹתִי הַיּוֹם מֵעַל פְּנֵי הָאֲדָמָה וּמִפָּנֶיךָ אֶסָּתֵר וְהָיִיתִי נָע וָנָד בָּאָרֶץ וְהָיָה כָל־מֹצְאִי יַהַרְגֵנִי׃ 15.16. וְדוֹר רְבִיעִי יָשׁוּבוּ הֵנָּה כִּי לֹא־שָׁלֵם עֲוֺן הָאֱמֹרִי עַד־הֵנָּה׃ 4.8. And Cain spoke unto Abel his brother. And it came to pass, when they were in the field, that Cain rose up against Abel his brother, and slew him." 4.14. Behold, Thou hast driven me out this day from the face of the land; and from Thy face shall I be hid; and I shall be a fugitive and a wanderer in the earth; and it will come to pass, that whosoever findeth me will slay me.’" 15.16. And in the fourth generation they shall come back hither; for the iniquity of the Amorite is not yet full.’"
2. Plato, Cratylus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Plato, Greater Hippias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

281b. So I have often gone as envoy to other states, but most often and concerning the most numerous and important matters to Lacedaemon . For that reason, then, since you ask me, I do not often come to this neighborhood. Soc. That’s what it is, Hippias, to be a truly wise and perfect man! For you are both in your private capacity able to earn much money from the young
4. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 71 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

71. Why, then, are we not also to repel this being, too, who is a sophist and a polluted person, condemning him to the death which is suited to him, namely, silence (for silence is the death of speech), in order that the mind may be no longer led away by its sophisms, but being completely emancipated from all the pleasures which are according to the body, "the brother," and being alienated from, and having shaken off the yoke of, all the trickeries according to "the neighbour," and the neighbouring outward senses, and from the sophistries in accordance with the "nearest" speech, may be able, in all purity, to apply itself to all the proper objects of the intellect.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 85, 82 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

82. Therefore it is necessary for any one who is about to enter into a contest of sophistry, to pay attention to all his words with such vigorous earnestness, that he may not only be able to escape from the manoeuvres of his adversaries, but may also in his turn attack them, and get the better of them, both in skill and in power.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 240 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

240. Therefore the most excellent, and most perfect kind of purification is this, not to admit into one's mind any improper notions, but to regulate it in peace and obedience to law, the ruler of which principles is justice. The next kind is, not to offend in one's language either by speaking falsely, or by swearing falsely, or by deceiving, or by practicing sophistry, or by laying false informations; or, in short, by letting loose one's mouth and tongue to the injury of any one, as it is better to put a bridle and an insuperable chain on those members. XLII.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 101 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

101. But Moses does not think it right to incline either to the right or to the left, or in short to any part of the earthly Edom; but rather to proceed along the middle way, which he with great propriety calls the royal road, for since God is the first and only God of the universe, so also the road to him, as being the king's road, is very properly denominated royal; and this royal road you must consider to be philosophy, not that philosophy which the existing sophistical crowd of men pursues (for they, studying the art of words in opposition to truth, have called crafty wickedness, wisdom, assigning a divine name to wicked action), but that which the ancient company of those men who practised virtue studied, rejecting the persuasive juggleries of pleasure, and adopting a virtuous and austere study of the honourable--
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 2.40 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.40. he who, in something of a piratical fashion, lays ambuscades against those who counterplot against him, takes up deceit, cajolery, trickery, sophistry, pretence, and hypocrisy, which being in their own nature blamable, are nevertheless praised when employed against the enemy; he who studies to be rich in the riches of nature takes up temperance and frugality; he who loves peace takes up obedience to law, a good reputation, freedom from pride, and equality. VI.
9. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.232-3.233 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 85 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

85. Very correctly, therefore, it is said, he led him out (exeµgagen exoµ) of the prison according to the body, of the caves existing in the external senses, of the sophistries displayed in deceitful speech; and beyond all this, out of himself and out of the idea that by his own self-exerted, selfimplanted, and independent power he was able to conceive and comprehend. XVII.
11. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 38, 41, 44, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. And Cain said to Abel his brother, "Let us go to the field. And it came to pass, that while they were in the field, Cain rose up against Abel his brother, and slew Him." What Cain proposes to do is this: having by invitation led Abel on to a dispute, to convince him by main force, using plausible and probable sophisms; for the field to which he invites him to come, we may call a symbol of rivalry and contention, forming our conjectures of things that are uncertain from our perception of those which are manifest.
12. Anon., Didache, 11.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. New Testament, Titus, 1.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.7. For the overseer must be blameless, as God's steward; not self-pleasing, not easily angered, not given to wine, not violent, not greedy for dishonest gain;
14. New Testament, Matthew, 10.8 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.8. Heal the sick, cleanse the lepers, and cast out demons. Freely you received, so freely give.
15. Irenaeus, Refutation of All Heresies, 1.4.3, 1.11.5, 1.13.3, 2.14.5, 2.26.1, 2.31.3, 2.32.4, 4.18.4, 5.20.1-5.20.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

16. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 14.5.12, 14.6.4-14.6.6, 14.6.9, 14.6.12-14.6.13, 14.7-14.9 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
bilhah Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
dialectic, criticism of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
didache Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 156
eristic, connection with heresy Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
eve and mary Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 156
exegesis, allegorical Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
foreign women Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
gnosticism, as sophistical Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
irenaeus, on heresy and sophism Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
jewish succession, orthodox borrowings from jewish heresiology Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
joseph Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
mary Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 156
midianite women Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
moses Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
parody and pastiche Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 156
participation Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 156
philo Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 156
philo of alexandria Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
philosophy' Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 156
philosophy, criticized as divided Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
philosophy, positive invocation and use of Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
phineas Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
potiphars wife Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
seductive women Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
sophistry, heresy connected to Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
sophistry Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 156
stoicism, pejorative comparison in heresiology Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
tamar Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
xenophanes Osborne, Irenaeus of Lyons (2001) 156
zilpah Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 111
μικρολογία Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
πολυπραγμοσύνη Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143
ἀσάφεια Boulluec, The Notion of Heresy in Greek Literature in the Second and Third Centuries (2022) 143