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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9242
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Life Of Moses, 1.10-1.11


nanbut when, as is commonly the case in monarchies, some persons discovered what was kept secret and in darkness, of those persons who are always eager to bring any new report to the king, his parents being afraid lest while seeking to secure the safety of one individual, they who were many might become involved in his destruction, with many tears exposed their child on the banks of the river, and departed groaning and lamenting, pitying themselves for the necessity which had fallen upon them, and calling themselves the slayers and murderers of their child, and commiserating the infant too for his destruction, which they had hoped to avert.


nanThen, as was natural for people involved in a miserable misfortune, they accused themselves as having brought a heavier affliction on themselves than they need have done. "For why," said they, "did we not expose him at the first moment of his birth?" For people in general do not look upon one who has not lived long enough to partake of salutary food as a human being at all. "But we, in our superfluous affection, have nourished him these three entire months, causing ourselves by such conduct more abundant grief, and inflicting upon him a heavier punishment, in order that he, having at last attained to a great capacity for feeling pleasures and pains, should at last perish in the perception of the most grievous evils.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 1.22 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.22. וַיְצַו פַּרְעֹה לְכָל־עַמּוֹ לֵאמֹר כָּל־הַבֵּן הַיִּלּוֹד הַיְאֹרָה תַּשְׁלִיכֻהוּ וְכָל־הַבַּת תְּחַיּוּן׃ 1.22. And Pharaoh charged all his people, saying: ‘Every son that is born ye shall cast into the river, and every daughter ye shall save alive.’"
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 20.12 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

20.12. וְגַם־אָמְנָה אֲחֹתִי בַת־אָבִי הִוא אַךְ לֹא בַת־אִמִּי וַתְּהִי־לִי לְאִשָּׁה׃ 20.12. And moreover she is indeed my sister, the daughter of my father, but not the daughter of my mother; and so she became my wife."
3. Anon., Jubilees, 47.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

47.9. And she said (unto her): "Go." And she went and called thy mother Jochebed, and she gave her wages, and she nursed thee.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 50 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

50. For the association of men, with a view to the procreation of children, makes virgins women. But when God begins to associate with the soul, he makes that which was previously woman now again virgin. Since banishing and destroying all the degenerate appetites unbecoming a human being, by which it had been made effeminate, he introduces in their stead genuine, and perfect, and unadulterated virtues; therefore, he will not converse with Sarah before all the habits, such as other women have, have left her, and till she has returned into the class of pure virgins. XV. 50. These, then, were the things which it was necessary to explain beforehand. But now we must turn to the commands themselves, and investigate everything which is marked by especial importance or difference in them. Now God divided them, being ten, as they are, into two tables of five each, which he engraved on two pillars. And the first five have the precedence and pre-eminence in honour; but the second five have an inferior place assigned to them. But both the tables are beautiful and advantageous to life, opening to men wrought and level roads kept within limits by one end, so as to secure the unwavering and secure progress of that soul which is continually desiring what is most excellent.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.7, 1.11, 1.15, 1.21, 1.23, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.7. And his father and mother were among the most excellent persons of their time, and though they were of the same time, still they were induced to unite themselves together more from an uimity of feeling than because they were related in blood; and Moses is the seventh generation in succession from the original settler in the country who was the founder of the whole race of the Jews. 1.11. Then, as was natural for people involved in a miserable misfortune, they accused themselves as having brought a heavier affliction on themselves than they need have done. "For why," said they, "did we not expose him at the first moment of his birth?" For people in general do not look upon one who has not lived long enough to partake of salutary food as a human being at all. "But we, in our superfluous affection, have nourished him these three entire months, causing ourselves by such conduct more abundant grief, and inflicting upon him a heavier punishment, in order that he, having at last attained to a great capacity for feeling pleasures and pains, should at last perish in the perception of the most grievous evils. 1.15. Then, after she had surveyed him from head to foot, and admired his elegant form and healthy vigorous appearance, and saw that he was crying, she had compassion on him, her soul being already moved within her by maternal feelings of affection as if he had been her own child. And when she knew that the infant belonged to one of the Hebrews who was afraid because of the commandment of the king, she herself conceived the idea of rearing him up, and took counsel with herself on the subject, thinking that it was not safe to bring him at once into the palace; 1.21. And immediately he had all kinds of masters, one after another, some coming of their own accord from the neighbouring countries and the different districts of Egypt, and some being even procured from Greece by the temptation of large presents. But in a short time he surpassed all their knowledge, anticipating all their lessons by the excellent natural endowments of his own genius; so that everything in his case appeared to be a ecollecting rather than a learning, while he himself also, without any teacher, comprehended by his instinctive genius many difficult subjects; 1.23. Accordingly he speedily learnt arithmetic, and geometry, and the whole science of rhythm and harmony and metre, and the whole of music, by means of the use of musical instruments, and by lectures on the different arts, and by explanations of each topic; and lessons on these subjects were given him by Egyptian philosophers, who also taught him the philosophy which is contained in symbols, which they exhibit in those sacred characters of hieroglyphics, as they are called, and also that philosophy which is conversant about that respect which they pay to animals which they invest with the honours due to God. And all the other branches of the encyclical education he learnt from Greeks; and the philosophers from the adjacent countries taught him Assyrian literature and the knowledge of the heavenly bodies so much studied by the Chaldaeans. 2.1. The first volume of this treatise relates to the subject of the birth and bringing up of Moses, and also of his education and of his government of his people, which he governed not merely irreproachably, but in so exceedingly praiseworthy a manner; and also of all the affairs, which took place in Egypt, and in the travels and journeyings of the nation, and of the events which happened with respect to their crossing the Red Sea and in the desert, which surpass all power of description; and, moreover, of all the labours which he conducted to a successful issue, and of the inheritances which he distributed in portions to his soldiers. But the book which we are now about to compose relates to the affairs which follow those others in due order, and bear a certain correspondence and connection with them.
6. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 2.236, 2.238 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.238. 1. Moses, therefore, when he was born, and brought up in the foregoing manner, and came to the age of maturity, made his virtue manifest to the Egyptians; and showed that he was born for the bringing them down, and raising the Israelites. And the occasion he laid hold of was this:—
7. New Testament, Acts, 7.20-7.22, 12.1-12.11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.20. At that time Moses was born, and was exceedingly handsome. He was nourished three months in his father's house. 7.21. When he was thrown out, Pharaoh's daughter took him up, and reared him as her own son. 7.22. Moses was instructed in all the wisdom of the Egyptians. He was mighty in his words and works. 12.1. Now about that time, Herod the king stretched out his hands to oppress some of the assembly. 12.2. He killed James, the brother of John, with the sword. 12.3. When he saw that it pleased the Jews, he proceeded to seize Peter also. This was during the days of unleavened bread. 12.4. When he had captured him, he put him in prison, and delivered him to four squads of four soldiers each to guard him, intending to bring him out to the people after the Passover. 12.5. Peter therefore was kept in the prison, but constant prayer was made by the assembly to God for him. 12.6. The same night when Herod was about to bring him out, Peter was sleeping between two soldiers, bound with two chains. Guards in front of the door kept the prison. 12.7. Behold, an angel of the Lord stood by him, and a light shone in the cell. He struck Peter on the side, and woke him up, saying, "Stand up quickly!" His chains fell off from his hands. 12.8. The angel said to him, "Put on your clothes, and tie on your sandals." He did so. He said to him, "Put on your cloak, and follow me. 12.9. He went out, and followed him. He didn't know that what was done by the angel was real, but thought he saw a vision. 12.10. When they were past the first and the second guard, they came to the iron gate that leads into the city, which opened to them by itself. They went out, and passed on through one street, and immediately the angel departed from him. 12.11. When Peter had come to himself, he said, "Now I truly know that the Lord has sent out his angel and delivered me out of the hand of Herod, and from everything the Jewish people were expecting.
8. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 9.27.4, 9.27.23-9.27.25 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

9. Origen, Against Celsus, 3.46 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

3.46. And if you come to the books written after the time of Jesus, you will find that those multitudes of believers who hear the parables are, as it were, without, and worthy only of exoteric doctrines, while the disciples learn in private the explanation of the parables. For, privately, to His own disciples did Jesus open up all things, esteeming above the multitudes those who desired to know His wisdom. And He promises to those who believe upon Him to send them wise men and scribes, saying, Behold, I will send unto you wise men and scribes, and some of them they shall kill and crucify. And Paul also, in the catalogue of charismata bestowed by God, placed first the word of wisdom, and second, as being inferior to it, the word of knowledge, but third, and lower down, faith. And because he regarded the word as higher than miraculous powers, he for that reason places workings of miracles and gifts of healings in a lower place than the gifts of the word. And in the Acts of the Apostles Stephen bears witness to the great learning of Moses, which he had obtained wholly from ancient writings not accessible to the multitude. For he says: And Moses was learned in all the wisdom of the Egyptians. And therefore, with respect to his miracles, it was suspected that he wrought them perhaps, not in virtue of his professing to come from God, but by means of his Egyptian knowledge, in which he was well versed. For the king, entertaining such a suspicion, summoned the Egyptian magicians, and wise men, and enchanters, who were found to be of no avail as against the wisdom of Moses, which proved superior to all the wisdom of the Egyptians.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(artapanus), exposure as infant Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
(artapanus), teacher of orpheus (artapanus) Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
abortion Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 391
abraham Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63
amram Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63
artapanus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
athena Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63
body Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63
born, reared, educated Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
chaos Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 391
children/offspring, exposing of Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 391
egypt, moses as teacher of orpheus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
egypt, mosess miraculous prison escape Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
eschatology/eschatological, woes/conflict/tumult Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 391
ezekiel, tragedian, acts of apostles comparison Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
ezekiel, tragedian Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
hecataeus Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 391
judaism, mosess education Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
judaism, mosess exposure as infant Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
minor, mosess education Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
miriam Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63
moses, egyptian education Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
moses, his mothers Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63
nile Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63
orpheus, artapanus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
orpheus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
pharaohs daughter Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63
philo of alexandria Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
prison escape topos in ancient authors Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 201
rome' Stuckenbruck, 1 Enoch 91-108 (2007) 391
sarah Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63
yochebed Bloch, Ancient Jewish Diaspora: Essays on Hellenism (2022) 63