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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9230
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Creation Of The World, 150-152


nanFor as the rational nature was as yet uncorrupted in the soul, and as no weakness, or disease, or affliction had as yet come upon it, man having most pure and perfect perceptions of bodies and of things, devised names for them with great felicity and correctness of judgment, forming very admirable opinions as to the qualities which they displayed, so that their natures were at once perceived and correctly described by him. And he was so excellent in all good things that he speedily arrived at the very perfection of human happiness. LIII.


nanBut since nothing in creation lasts for ever, but all mortal things are liable to inevitable changes and alterations, it was unavoidable that the first man should also undergo some disaster. And the beginning of his life being liable to reproach, was his wife. For, as long as he was single, he resembled, as to his creation, both the world and God; and he represented in his soul the characteristics of the nature of each, I do not mean all of them, but such as a mortal constitution was capable of admitting. But when woman also was created, man perceiving a closely connected figure and a kindred formation to his own, rejoiced at the sight, and approached her and embraced her.


nanAnd she, in like manner, beholding a creature greatly resembling herself, rejoiced also, and addressed him in reply with due modesty. And love being engendered, and, as it were, uniting two separate portions of one animal into one body, adapted them to each other, implanting in each of them a desire of connection with the other with a view to the generation of a being similar to themselves. And this desire caused likewise pleasure to their bodies, which is the beginning of iniquities and transgressions, and it is owing to this that men have exchanged their previously immortal and happy existence for one which is mortal and full of misfortune. LVI.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "17.15" "17.15" "17 15" \n1 1 1 1 None\n2 1.26 1.26 1 26 \n3 1.27 1.27 1 27 \n4 2 2 2 None (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 3-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Why then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV. 10. He also considered this point, in the second place, that it is indispensable that the soul of the man who is about to receive sacred laws should be thoroughly cleansed and purified from all stains, however difficult to be washed out, which the promiscuous multitude of mixed men from all quarters has impregnated cities with;
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

51. And he calls Bethuel the father of Rebekkah. How, then, can the daughter of God, namely, wisdom, be properly called a father? is it because the name indeed of wisdom is feminine but the sex masculine? For indeed all the virtues bear the names of women, but have the powers and actions of full-grown men, since whatever is subsequent to God, even if it be the most ancient of all other things, still has only the second place when compared with that omnipotent Being, and appears not so much masculine as feminine, in accordance with its likeness to the other creatures; for as the male always has the precedence, the female falls short, and is inferior in rank.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 63-64, 62 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

62. Accordingly, Abraham, as long as he was abiding in the land of the Chaldaeans, that is to say, in opinion, before he received his new name, and while he was still called Abram, was a man born of heaven, investigating the sublime nature of things on high, and all that took place in these regions, and the causes of them, and studying everything of that kind in the true spirit of philosophy; on which account he received an appellation corresponding to the pursuits to which he devoted himself: for the name Abram, being interpreted, signifies the sublime father, and is a name very fitting for the paternal mind, which in every direction contemplates sublime and heavenly things: for the mind is the father of our composite being, reaching as high as the sky and even farther.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 61-76, 60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

60. for it is said in the scripture, "Thy name shall not be called Abram, but Abraham shall thy name be." Some, then, of those persons who are fond of disputes, and who are always eager to affix a stain upon what is irreproachable, on things as well as bodies, and who wage an implacable war against sacred things, while they calumniate everything which does not appear to preserve strict decorum in speech, being the symbols of nature which is always fond of being concealed, perverting it all so as to give it a worse appearance after a very accurate investigation, do especially find fault with the changes of names.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 135-149, 151-152, 16-20, 69-71, 76, 134 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

134. After this, Moses says that "God made man, having taken clay from the earth, and he breathed into his face the breath of life." And by this expression he shows most clearly that there is a vast difference between man as generated now, and the first man who was made according to the image of God. For man as formed now is perceptible to the external senses, partaking of qualities, consisting of body and soul, man or woman, by nature mortal. But man, made according to the image of God, was an idea, or a genus, or a seal, perceptible only by the intellect, incorporeal, neither male nor female, imperishable by nature.
7. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.90, 2.14-2.15, 3.83-3.84, 3.86-3.87, 3.244-3.245 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.90. And the Lord God commanded Adam, saying, of every tree that is in the Paradise thou mayest freely eat; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil ye shall not eat; but in the day on which ye eat of it ye shall die the death." A question may arise here to what kind of Adam he gave this command and who, this Adam was. For Moses has not made any mention of him before; but now is the first time that he has named him. Are we then to think that he is desirous to supply you with the name of the factitious man? "And he calls him," continues Moses, "Earth." For this is the interpretation of the name of Adam. Accordingly, when you hear the name Adam, you must think that he is an earthly and perishable being; for he is made according to an image, being not earthly but heavenly.
8. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.20-1.21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. New Testament, Ephesians, 3.16 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.16. that he would grant you, according to the riches of his glory, that you may be strengthened with power through his Spirit in the inward man;
10. Porphyry, Letter To Marcella, 33 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

33. Naked was he sent into the world, and naked shall he call on Him that sent him. For |51 God listens only to those who are not weighed down by alien things, and guards those who are purified from corruption. Consider it a great help towards the blessed life if the captive in the thraldom of nature takes his captor captive. For we are bound in the chains that nature has cast around us, by the belly, the throat and the other members and parts of the body, and by the use of these and the pleasant sensations that arise therefrom and the fears they occasion. But if we rise superior to their witchcraft, and avoid the snares laid by them, we lead our captor captive. Neither trouble thyself much whether thou be male or female in body, nor look on thyself as a woman, for I did not approach thee as such. Flee all that is womanish in the soul, as though thou hadst a man's body about thee. For what is born from a virgin soul and a pure mind is most blessed, since imperishable springs from imperishable. But what the body produces is held corrupt by all the gods.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abram/abraham, change of name Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 249, 266
adam Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122, 123; Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 266
blank, david l. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 45
body Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
christian Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
divine Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
ephesians Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
etymology, etymological Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122
etymology, hebrew Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 266
eve Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
form Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
gender of words Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 45
genesis Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122
god Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
imposition thesis Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 123
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 249
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 249
judaism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 249
logos Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
moses Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122
name-givers onomathetai, impositores, roman kings Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 249, 266
names, philosophy of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 249
origen Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
philo of alexandria Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122, 123; Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
plato, cratylus Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122
platonic Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
quarrelsome exegetes Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 249, 266
reason, rationality ratio Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 123
schmidt, r. l. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 45
socrates Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 249, 266
stoics and stoicism Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122
varro Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 122
virtue Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
woman Xenophontos and Marmodoro, The Reception of Greek Ethics in Late Antiquity and Byzantium (2021) 20
words, correctness or appropriateness of' Pezzini and Taylor,Language and Nature in the Classical Roman World (2019)" 123