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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9219
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 9


nanAnd they shall undergo eternal banishment, God himself confirming their expulsion, when he bids the wise man obey the word spoken by Sarah, and she urges him expressly to cast out the serving woman and her son; and it is good to be guided by virtue, and especially so when it teaches such lessons as this, that the most perfect natures are very greatly different from the mediocre habits, and that wisdom is a wholly different thing from sophistry; for the one labours to devise what is persuasive for the establishment of a false opinion, which is pernicious to the soul, but wisdom, with long meditation on the truth by the knowledge of right reason, bring real advantage to the intellect.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "17.15" "17.15" "17 15"\n1 "17.19" "17.19" "17 19"\n2 "21.10" "21.10" "21 10"\n3 "29.31" "29.31" "29 31"\n4 1.1 1.1 1 1 \n.. ... ... .. .. \n72 38.22 38.22 38 22 \n73 38.23 38.23 38 23 \n74 38.24 38.24 38 24 \n75 38.25 38.25 38 25 \n76 38.26 38.26 38 26 \n\n[77 rows x 4 columns] (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 18.26-18.30 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

18.26. וְאֶל־הַלְוִיִּם תְּדַבֵּר וְאָמַרְתָּ אֲלֵהֶם כִּי־תִקְחוּ מֵאֵת בְּנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵל אֶת־הַמַּעֲשֵׂר אֲשֶׁר נָתַתִּי לָכֶם מֵאִתָּם בְּנַחֲלַתְכֶם וַהֲרֵמֹתֶם מִמֶּנּוּ תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מַעֲשֵׂר מִן־הַמַּעֲשֵׂר׃ 18.27. וְנֶחְשַׁב לָכֶם תְּרוּמַתְכֶם כַּדָּגָן מִן־הַגֹּרֶן וְכַמְלֵאָה מִן־הַיָּקֶב׃ 18.28. כֵּן תָּרִימוּ גַם־אַתֶּם תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מִכֹּל מַעְשְׂרֹתֵיכֶם אֲשֶׁר תִּקְחוּ מֵאֵת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וּנְתַתֶּם מִמֶּנּוּ אֶת־תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה לְאַהֲרֹן הַכֹּהֵן׃ 18.29. מִכֹּל מַתְּנֹתֵיכֶם תָּרִימוּ אֵת כָּל־תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מִכָּל־חֶלְבּוֹ אֶת־מִקְדְּשׁוֹ מִמֶּנּוּ׃ 18.26. ’Moreover thou shalt speak unto the Levites, and say unto them: When ye take of the children of Israel the tithe which I have given you from them for your inheritance, then ye shall set apart of it a gift for the LORD, even a tithe of the tithe." 18.27. And the gift which ye set apart shall be reckoned unto you, as though it were the corn of the threshing-floor, and as the fulness of the wine-press." 18.28. Thus ye also shall set apart a gift unto the LORD of all your tithes, which ye receive of the children of Israel; and thereof ye shall give the gift which is set apart unto the LORD to Aaron the priest." 18.29. Out of all that is given you ye shall set apart all of that which is due unto the LORD, of all the best thereof, even the hallowed part thereof out of it." 18.30. Therefore thou shalt say unto them: When ye set apart the best thereof from it, then it shall be counted unto the Levites as the increase of the threshing-floor, and as the increase of the wine-press."
3. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 14.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

14.3. הַכֹּל סָר יַחְדָּו נֶאֱלָחוּ אֵין עֹשֵׂה־טוֹב אֵין גַּם־אֶחָד׃ 14.3. They are all corrupt, they are together become impure; there is none that doeth good, no, not one."
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 251 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

251. And that you may have no suspicion of any jealousy on my part, take, if you will, my own handmaid to wife; who is a slave indeed as to her body, but free and noble as to her mind; whose good qualities I have for a long time proved and experienced from the day when she was first introduced into my house, being an Egyptian by blood, and a Hebrew by deliberate choice.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 11, 14-16, 8, 84, 9-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. By means of this husbandry, all the trees of the passions and vices, which soot forth and grow up to a height, bringing forth pernicious fruits, are rooted up, and cut down, and cleared away, so that not even the smallest fragment of them is left, from which any new shoots of evil actions can subsequently spring up.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 12-13, 3-4, 40-41, 5, 51, 6-8, 10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Why then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV. 10. He also considered this point, in the second place, that it is indispensable that the soul of the man who is about to receive sacred laws should be thoroughly cleansed and purified from all stains, however difficult to be washed out, which the promiscuous multitude of mixed men from all quarters has impregnated cities with;
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 10-12, 124-125, 13, 139, 14, 140-141, 15, 154, 16-18, 180, 19, 2, 20-27, 3, 34-39, 4, 40-44, 48-49, 5, 50-51, 53, 56-58, 6, 61, 63, 65, 7, 71-79, 8, 80-88, 9, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. But Sarah the wife of Abraham had not borne him any child. And she had an Egyptian handmaiden, who name was Hagar. And Sarah said unto Abraham, Behold, the Lord has closed me up, so that I should not bear children; go in unto my handmaiden that thou mayest have children by Her.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 150-156, 149 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

149. Nor does he, who is sent forth to search for that virtue which is invincible and embittered against the ridiculous pursuits of men, by name Tamar, find her. And this failure of his is strictly in accordance with nature; for we read in the scripture, "And Judah sent a kid in the hands of his shepherd, the Adullamite, to receive back his pledge from the woman, and he found her not: and he asked the men of the place, Where is the harlot who was in Ae by the wayside? and they said, There is no harlot in this place. And he returned back to Judah, and said unto him, I have not found her, and the men of the place say that there is no harlot there. And Judah said, Let her keep the things, only let me not be made a laughing-stock, I because I have sent the kid, and you because you have not found Her." Oh, the admirable trial! oh, the temptation becoming sacred things!
9. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 63-64, 62 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

62. Accordingly, Abraham, as long as he was abiding in the land of the Chaldaeans, that is to say, in opinion, before he received his new name, and while he was still called Abram, was a man born of heaven, investigating the sublime nature of things on high, and all that took place in these regions, and the causes of them, and studying everything of that kind in the true spirit of philosophy; on which account he received an appellation corresponding to the pursuits to which he devoted himself: for the name Abram, being interpreted, signifies the sublime father, and is a name very fitting for the paternal mind, which in every direction contemplates sublime and heavenly things: for the mind is the father of our composite being, reaching as high as the sky and even farther.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 199-207, 198 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 121-122, 130-136, 139, 143-144, 147, 152, 189-192, 197, 2, 255, 60-80, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. Abraham was ninety and nine years old; and the Lord appeared unto Abraham, and said unto him, I am thy God." The number of nine, when added to the number ninety, is very near to a hundred; in which number the self-taught race shone forth, namely Isaac, the most excellent joy of all enjoyments; for he was born when his father was a hundred years old.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 149-150, 148 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

148. And with great beauty Moses has attributed the giving of names to the different animals to the first created man, for it is a work of wisdom and indicative of royal authority, and man was full of intuitive wisdom and self-taught, having been created by the grace of God, and, moreover, was a king. And it is proper for a ruler to give names to each of his subjects. And, as was very natural, the power of domination was excessive in that first-created man, whom God formed with great care and thought worthy of the second rank in the creation, making him his own viceroy and the ruler of all other creatures. Since even those who have been born so many generations afterwards, when the race is becoming weakened by reason of the long intervals of time that have elapsed since the beginning of the world, do still exert the same power over the irrational beasts, preserving as it were a spark of the dominion and power which has been handed down to them by succession from their first ancestor.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 109 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

109. for who would converse in a similar manner with parents and children, being by nature the slave of the one, and by birth the master of the others? And who, again, would talk in the same manner to brothers or cousins; or, in short, to near and to distant relations? Who, again, could do so to friends and to strangers, to fellow citizens and to foreigners, though there may be no great difference in point of fortune, or nature, or age between them? For one must behave differently while associating with an old man and with a young one; and, again, with a man of high reputation and a humble man, with a servant and a master; and, again, with a woman and a man, and with an illiterate and a clever man.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 139 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

139. Most correctly, therefore, after the servant has said, "Give me a little water to drink," does she make answer, not in the manner corresponding to his request: "I will give you to drink," but "Drink." For the one expression would have been suited to one who was displaying the riches of God, which are poured forth for all who are worthy of them and who are able to think of them; but the other expression is appropriate to one who professes that she will teach. But nothing which is connected with mere professions is akin to virtue.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On Sobriety, 8-9, 3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.73, 1.161, 1.240 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.73. And do not wonder if, according to the rules of allegorical description, the sun is likened to the Father and Governor of the universe; for in reality nothing is like unto God; but those things which by the vain opinion of men are thought to be so, are only two things, one invisible and the other visible; the soul being the invisible thing, and the sun the visible one. 1.161. for having forsaken the language of those who indulge in sublime conversations about astronomy, a language imitating that of the Chaldaeans, foreign and barbarous, he was brought over to that which was suited to a rational being, namely, to the service of the great Cause of all things. 1.240. Do you not see that encyclical instruction, that is, Hagar, says to the angel, "Art thou God who seest Me?" for she was not capable of beholding the most ancient cause, inasmuch as she was by birth a native of Egypt. But now the mind begins to be improved, so as to be able to contemplate the governor of all the powers;
17. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.56, 1.124, 1.340, 2.123, 2.167, 2.189-2.190, 3.9, 4.16, 4.179-4.181 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.56. There is, in the history of the law, a record of one man who ventured on this exploit of noble daring, for when he saw some men connecting themselves with foreign women, and by reason of their allurements neglecting all their national customs and laws, and practising fabulous ceremonies, he was seized with a sudden enthusiasm in the presence of the whole multitude; and driving away all those on each side who were collected to see the sight, he slew one man who was so daring as to put himself forward as the leader and chief of this transgression of the law (for the impious deed had been already displayed and made a public exhibition of 1.124. on which account the law altogether forbids any foreigner to partake in any degree of the holy things, even if he be a man of the noblest birth among the natives of the land, and irreproachable as respects both men and women, in order that the sacred honours may not be adulterated, but may remain carefully guarded in the family of the priests; 1.340. And even without reckoning the advantage derived from these things; sight also affords us the greatest benefits in respect of the power of distinguishing one's relatives and strangers, and friends, and avoiding what is injurious and choosing what is beneficial. Now each of the other parts of the body has been created with reference to appropriate uses, which are of great importance, as, for instance, the feet were made for walking, and for all the other uses to which the legs can be applied; again, the hands were created for the purpose of doing, or giving, or taking anything; and the eyes, as a sort of universal good, afford both to the hands and feet, and to all the other parts of the body the cause of being able to act or move rightly; 2.123. But the law permits the people to acquire a property in slaves who are not of their own countrymen, but who are of different nations; intending in the first place that there should be a difference between one's own countrymen and strangers, and secondly, not desiring completely to exclude from the constitution that most entirely indispensable property of slaves; for there are an innumerable host of circumstances in life which require the ministrations of Servants.{16}{sections 124û139 were omitted in Yonge's translation because the edition on which Yonge based his translation, Mangey, lacked this material. These lines have been newly translated for this edition.} 2.167. For this reason it amazes me that some dare to charge the nation with an anti-social stance, a nation which has made such an extensive use of fellowship and goodwill toward all people everywhere that they offer up prayers and feasts and first fruits on behalf of the common race of human beings and serve the really self-existent God both on behalf of themselves and of others who have run from the services which they should have rendered. 2.189. for then the voice of a trumpet sounded from heaven, which it is natural to suppose reached to the very extremities of the universe, so that so wondrous a sound attracted all who were present, making them consider, as it is probable, that such mighty events were signs betokening some great things to be accomplished. 2.190. And what more great or more beneficial thing could come to men than laws affecting the whole race? And what was common to all mankind was this: the trumpet is the instrument of war, sounding both when commanding the charge and the retreat. ... There is also another kind of war, ordained of God, when nature is at variance with itself, its different parts attacking one another. 3.9. Therefore, even that pleasure which is in accordance with nature is often open to blame, when any one indulges in it immoderately and insatiably, as men who are unappeasably voracious in respect of eating, even if they take no kind of forbidden or unwholesome food; and as men who are madly devoted to association with women, and who commit themselves to an immoderate degree not with other men's wives, but with their own. 4.16. And before now, some men, increasing their own innate wickedness, and directing the natural treachery of their characters to a violation of all rights, have studied to bring slavery not only upon strangers and foreigners, but even upon those of the same nation as themselves; and sometimes, even upon men of the same borough and of the same tribe, disregarding the community of laws and customs, in which they have been bred up with them from their earliest infancy, which nature stamps upon their souls as the firmest bond of good will in the case of all those who are not very intractable and greatly addicted to cruelty; 4.179. And one may almost say that the whole nation of the Jews may be looked upon in the light of orphans, if they are compared with all other nations in other lands; for other nations, as often as they are afflicted by any calamities which are not of divine infliction, are in no want of assistance by reason of their frequent intercourse with other nations, from their habitual dealings in common. But this nation of the Jews has no such allies by reason of the peculiarity of its laws and customs. And their laws are of necessity strict and rigorous, as they are intended to train them to the greatest height of virtue; and what is strict and rigorous is austere. And such laws and customs the generality of men avoid, because of their inclination for and their adoption of pleasure. 4.180. But, nevertheless, Moses says that the great Ruler of the universe, whose inheritance they are, does always feel compassion and pity for the orphan and desolate of this his people, because they have been dedicated to him, the Creator and Father of all, as a sort of first-fruits of the whole human race. 4.181. And the cause of this dedication to God was the excessive and admirable righteousness and virtue of the founders of the nation, which remain like undying plants, bearing a fruit which shall ever flourish to the salvation of their descendants, and to the benefit of all persons and all things, provided only that the sins which they commit are such as are remediable and not wholly unpardonable.
18. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 160, 222, 89, 147 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

147. But, nevertheless, the lawgiver neither neglected the safety of the unclean animals, nor did he permit those which were clean to use their strength in disregard of justice, crying out and declaring loudly in express words, if one may say so, to those persons who have ears in their soul, not to injure any one of a different nation, unless they have some grounds for bringing accusations against them beyond the fact of their being of another nation, which is not ground of blame; for those things which are not wickedness, and which do not proceed from wickedness, are free from all reproach. XXVIII.
19. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.149, 2.43-2.44 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.149. For, as he had abandoned the chief authority in Egypt, which he might have had as the grandson of the reigning king, on account of the iniquities which were being perpetrated in that country, and by reason of his nobleness of soul and of the greatness of his spirit, and the natural detestation of wickedness, scorning and rejecting all the hopes which he might have conceived from those who had adopted him, it seemed good to the Ruler and Governor of the universe to recompense him with the sovereign authority over a more populous and more powerful nation, which he was about to take to himself out of all other nations and to consecrate to the priesthood, that it might for ever offer up prayers for the whole universal race of mankind, for the sake of averting evil from them and procuring them a participation in blessings. 2.43. In this way those admirable, and incomparable, and most desirable laws were made known to all people, whether private individuals or kings, and this too at a period when the nation had not been prosperous for a long time. And it is generally the case that a cloud is thrown over the affairs of those who are not flourishing, so that but little is known of them; 2.44. and then, if they make any fresh start and begin to improve, how great is the increase of their renown and glory? I think that in that case every nation, abandoning all their own individual customs, and utterly disregarding their national laws, would change and come over to the honour of such a people only; for their laws shining in connection with, and simultaneously with, the prosperity of the nation, will obscure all others, just as the rising sun obscures the stars.
20. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 200, 211, 72, 183 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

183. but to expect to be looked upon as worthy to receive especial privileges and precedence, by a master who was of a different nation and a young man and an absolute monarch, would have seemed like insanity. But it would seem that he was showing civility to the whole district of the Alexandrians, to which he was thus giving a privilege, when promising to give his decision speedily; unless, indeed, disregarding the character of a fair and impartial hearer, he was intending to be a fellow suitor with our adversaries and an enemy of ours, instead of behaving like a judge." XXIX.
21. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.63-1.67, 2.14-2.15, 3.39, 3.42-3.43, 3.83-3.87, 3.217-3.219, 3.244-3.245 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.63. And a river goes forth out of Eden to water the Paradise. From thence it is separated into four heads: the name of the one is Pheison. That is the one which encircles the whole land of Evilat. There is the country where there is gold, and the gold of that land is good. There also are the carbuncle and the sapphire stone. And the name of the second river is Gihon; this is that which encircles the whole land of Ethiopia. And the third river is the Tigris. This is the river which flows in front of the Assyrians. And the fourth river is the Euphrates." In these words Moses intends to sketch out the particular virtues. And they also are four in number, prudence, temperance, courage, and justice. Now the greatest river from which the four branches flow off, is generic virtue, which we have already called goodness; and the four branches are the same number of virtues. 1.64. Generic virtue, therefore, derives its beginning from Eden, which is the wisdom of God; which rejoices and exults, and triumphs, being delighted at and honoured on account of nothing else, except its Father, God, and the four particular virtues, are branches from the generic virtue, which like a river waters all the good actions of each, with an abundant stream of benefits. 1.65. Let us examine the expressions of the writer: "A river," says he, "goes forth out of Eden, to water the Paradise." This river is generic goodness; and this issues forth out of the Eden of the wisdom of God, and that is the word of God. For it is according to the word of God, that generic virtue was created. And generic virtue waters the Paradise: that is to say, it waters the particular virtues. But it does not derive its beginnings from any principle of locality, but from a principle of preeminence. For each of the virtues is really and truly a ruler and a queen. And the expression, "is separated," is equivalent to "is marked off by fixed boundaries;" since wisdom appoints them settled limits with reference to what is to be done. Courage with respect to what is to be endured; temperance with reference to what is to be chosen; and justice in respect of what is to be distributed. XX. 1.66. The name of one river is Pheison. This is that river which encircles all the land of Evilat; there is the country where there is gold. And the gold of that land is good; there also are the carbuncle and the sapphire stone." One of the four virtues is prudence, which Moses here calls Pheison: because the soul abstains, from, and guards against, acts of iniquity. And it meanders in a circle, and flows all round the land of Evilat; that is to say, it preserves a mild, and gentle, and favourable constitution. And as of all fusible essences, the most excellent and the most illustrious is gold, so also the virtue of the soul which enjoys the highest reputation, is prudence. 1.67. And when he uses the expression, "that is the country where there is gold," he is not speaking geographically, that is, where gold exists, but that is the country in which that valuable possession exists, brilliant as gold, tried in the fire, and valuable, namely, prudence. And this is confessed to be the most valuable possession of God. But with reference to the geographical position of virtue, there are two personages, each invested with distinctive qualities. One, the being who has prudence, the other, the being who exerts it; and these he likens to the carbuncle and the emerald. XXI.
22. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.20-1.21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

23. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 42, 44, 105 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

105. For many men have become wicked in respect of such sacred deposits, having, through their immoderate covetousness improperly used the property of others as their own. But do thou, O good man! endeavour with all thy strength, not only to present what you have received without injury and without adulteration, but also to take even more care than that of such things, that he who has deposited them with you may have no grounds to blame the care which has been exercised by you.
24. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 124-125, 123 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

123. But by this is meant wickedness, which is established in the souls of foolish men; the remedy for which (as one seeks for remedies for a severe disease) is found to be the just man, who is in possession of the panacea, justice. When, therefore, he has repelled these evils he is filled with joy, as also is Sarah; for she says, "The Lord hath caused me laughter;" and she adds further, "so that whosoever hears it shall rejoice with Me.
25. Philo of Alexandria, That Every Good Person Is Free, 93 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

93. Calanus was an Indian by birth, one of the gymnosophists; he, being looked upon as the man who was possessed of the greatest fortitude of all his contemporaries, and that too, not only by his own countrymen, but also by foreigners, which is the rarest of all things, was greatly admired by some kings of hostile countries, because he had combined virtuous actions with praiseworthy language;
26. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 168-169, 167 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

167. And besides all this, we must likewise add, that we are not speaking of a stern-looking and sordid kind of wisdom, contracted by profound thought and ill-humour; but, on the other hand, of that wisdom which wears on tranquil and cheerful appearance, being full of joy and happiness, by which men have often been led on to sport and divert themselves in no inelegant manner, indulging in amusements suitable to their dignified and earnest character, just as in a well-tuned lyre one may have a combination uniting, by means of opposite sounds, in one melodious harmony.
27. New Testament, Galatians, 4.21-4.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.21. Tell me, you that desire to be under the law, don't you listen to thelaw? 4.22. For it is written that Abraham had two sons, one by thehandmaid, and one by the free woman. 4.23. However, the son by thehandmaid was born according to the flesh, but the son by the free womanwas born through promise. 4.24. These things contain an allegory, forthese are two covets. One is from Mount Sinai, bearing children tobondage, which is Hagar. 4.25. For this Hagar is Mount Sinai inArabia, and answers to the Jerusalem that exists now, for she is inbondage with her children. 4.26. But the Jerusalem that is above isfree, which is the mother of us all. 4.27. For it is written,"Rejoice, you barren who don't bear. Break forth and shout, you that don't travail. For more are the children of the desolate than of her who has a husband. 4.28. Now we, brothers, as Isaac was, are children of promise. 4.29. But as then, he who was born according to the flesh persecutedhim who was born according to the Spirit, so also it is now. 4.30. However what does the Scripture say? "Throw out the handmaid and herson, for the son of the handmaid will not inherit with the son of thefree woman. 4.31. So then, brothers, we are not children of ahandmaid, but of the free woman.
28. New Testament, Romans, 3.9-3.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.9. What then? Are we better than they? No, in no way. For we previously charged both Jews and Greeks, that they are all under sin. 3.10. As it is written, "There is no one righteous. No, not one. 3.11. There is no one who understands. There is no one who seeks after God. 3.12. They have all turned aside. They have together become unprofitable. There is no one who does good, No, not, so much as one. 3.13. Their throat is an open tomb. With their tongues they have used deceit." "The poison of vipers is under their lips; 3.14. Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness. 3.15. Their feet are swift to shed blood. 3.16. Destruction and misery are in their ways. 3.17. The way of peace, they haven't known. 3.18. There is no fear of God before their eyes. 3.19. Now we know that whatever things the law says, it speaks to those who are under the law, that every mouth may be closed, and all the world may be brought under the judgment of God. 3.20. Because by the works of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight. For through the law comes the knowledge of sin.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aaron, as speech/logos prophorikos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510
abraham Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
abram/abraham, analogue to odysseus Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
abram/abraham, as type of soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 272
abram/abraham, change of name Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243, 266, 267, 272
abram/abraham, fall Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
abram/abraham, migration Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
abram/abraham, prayer for ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510, 511, 512
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 272
alexandria Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243
alien/foreigner, in philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 162
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9, 138, 139, 241, 243, 266, 267, 272, 386, 402, 414, 510, 511
allegory/allegoresis, etymology in/vs. Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 571
allegory/allegoresis, homeric parallels Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
allegory/allegoresis, of the soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
allegory/allegoresis, pedagogical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
allegory/allegoresis, platonist parallels Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
allegory/allegoresis Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 267, 272
allegory Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
arithmology, ten Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
attributes, divine, eternal Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 512
balaam Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 511
benjamin Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241
body Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 511
commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9
cycle, patriarchal, abrahamic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9
cycle, patriarchal, adamic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 9
cycle, patriarchal, noahic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 9
education Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 571
egypt Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157, 162
egyptians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
emotions, bad Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139
emotions, good Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139, 214
emotions Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139
epicureanism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
ethnos/ethne, in philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 162
etymology, greek Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 272
etymology, hebrew Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 266, 276, 277, 512
exposition of the law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402, 414
faith Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
fall, epistemic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
flesh Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 267
genos/gene/gens/genus, in philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 162
grace Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
hagar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 277, 402, 511; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
homer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
hope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
identity as nation or people, not defined by direct lineage in philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 162
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139, 214, 272, 276, 386, 402, 414, 571; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510, 511, 512, 571; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
israel, nation/people Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
israel, seer of god Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 512
jacob, practicer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 512
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9, 241, 511, 512
jethro Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
jews/judeans/ioudaioi, and ethnicity in philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
joseph Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 511
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139, 276, 414, 571
laughter Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139, 414
law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139, 510
leah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
lemma, main/primary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 9
levite Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
lineage and genealogy as identity marker, in philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 162
logos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243, 511, 512
many-named, prophet Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 267
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 267, 276, 510, 512; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 162
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243, 266, 267, 272, 276, 277
names, divine (lack of) Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
names, philosophy of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
odysseus Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
onomasticon Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 272
paideia/greek education Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
penelope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
pentateuch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 243, 512
perfection Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 243, 276, 511
philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157, 162
piety Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
plutarch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
preliminary studies Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277, 511
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402, 414
qge Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402, 414
quarrelsome exegetes Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243, 266, 267
rachel Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
reuben Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 511, 512
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 402, 510, 511, 571
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 241, 272, 276, 277, 386, 402, 414, 511; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
sophists Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510, 511, 571
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 266
tamar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
technique, rhetorical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
time Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
tithe, levitical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
values/character as identity marker, for philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 162
virginity Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
virtue, as queen Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 276
virtue, cardinal Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402
virtue, specific/generic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 267, 272, 277, 386, 402, 571
wisdom' Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510
wisdom Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 138, 214, 272, 277, 512; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
zipporah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386