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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9219
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 40-41


nanAnd Adam knew his wife, and she conceived and brought forth Cain; and she said I have gotten a man by means of the Lord; and he caused her also to bring forth Abel his Brother." These men, to whose virtue the Jewish legislation bears testimony, he does not represent as knowing their wives, such as Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, and if there are any others of like zeal with them;


nanfor since we say, that woman is to be understood symbolically as the outward sense, and since knowledge consists in alienation from the outward sense and from the body, it is plain that the lovers of wisdom must repudiate the outward sense rather than choose it, and is not this quite natural? for they who live with these men are in name indeed wives, but in fact virtues. Sarah is princess and guide, Rebecca is perseverance in what is good; Leah again is virtue, fainting and weary at the long continuance of exertion, which every foolish man declines, and avoids, and repudiates; and Zipporah, the wife of Moses, is virtue, mounting up from earth to heaven, and arriving at a just comprehension of the divine and blessed virtues which exist there, and she is called a bird.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

31 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "29.31" "29.31" "29 31" \n1 16.6 16.6 16 6 \n2 2.18 2.18 2 18 \n3 2.19 2.19 2 19 \n4 2.20 2.20 2 20 \n5 2.21 2.21 2 21 \n6 2.22 2.22 2 22 \n7 2.23 2.23 2 23 \n8 2.24 2.24 2 24 \n9 2.25 2.25 2 25 \n10 24 24 24 None\n11 25 25 25 None\n12 26 26 26 None\n13 27 27 27 None\n14 38.15 38.15 38 15 \n15 38.16 38.16 38 16 \n16 38.17 38.17 38 17 \n17 38.18 38.18 38 18 \n18 38.19 38.19 38 19 \n19 38.20 38.20 38 20 \n20 38.21 38.21 38 21 \n21 38.22 38.22 38 22 \n22 38.23 38.23 38 23 \n23 38.24 38.24 38 24 \n24 38.25 38.25 38 25 \n25 38.26 38.26 38 26 \n26 4.1 4.1 4 1 \n27 4.2 4.2 4 2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 8.22-8.31 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

8.22. יְהוָה קָנָנִי רֵאשִׁית דַּרְכּוֹ קֶדֶם מִפְעָלָיו מֵאָז׃ 8.23. מֵעוֹלָם נִסַּכְתִּי מֵרֹאשׁ מִקַּדְמֵי־אָרֶץ׃ 8.24. בְּאֵין־תְּהֹמוֹת חוֹלָלְתִּי בְּאֵין מַעְיָנוֹת נִכְבַּדֵּי־מָיִם׃ 8.25. בְּטֶרֶם הָרִים הָטְבָּעוּ לִפְנֵי גְבָעוֹת חוֹלָלְתִּי׃ 8.26. עַד־לֹא עָשָׂה אֶרֶץ וְחוּצוֹת וְרֹאשׁ עָפְרוֹת תֵּבֵל׃ 8.27. בַּהֲכִינוֹ שָׁמַיִם שָׁם אָנִי בְּחוּקוֹ חוּג עַל־פְּנֵי תְהוֹם׃ 8.28. בְּאַמְּצוֹ שְׁחָקִים מִמָּעַל בַּעֲזוֹז עִינוֹת תְּהוֹם׃ 8.29. בְּשׂוּמוֹ לַיָּם חֻקּוֹ וּמַיִם לֹא יַעַבְרוּ־פִיו בְּחוּקוֹ מוֹסְדֵי אָרֶץ׃ 8.31. מְשַׂחֶקֶת בְּתֵבֵל אַרְצוֹ וְשַׁעֲשֻׁעַי אֶת־בְּנֵי אָדָם׃ 8.22. The LORD made me as the beginning of His way, The first of His works of old." 8.23. I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, Or ever the earth was." 8.24. When there were no depths, I was brought forth; When there were no fountains abounding with water." 8.25. Before the mountains were settled, Before the hills was I brought forth;" 8.26. While as yet He had not made the earth, nor the fields, Nor the beginning of the dust of the world." 8.27. When He established the heavens, I was there; When He set a circle upon the face of the deep," 8.28. When He made firm the skies above, When the fountains of the deep showed their might," 8.29. When He gave to the sea His decree, That the waters should not transgress His commandment, When He appointed the foundations of the earth;" 8.30. Then I was by Him, as a nursling; And I was daily all delight, Playing always before Him," 8.31. Playing in His habitable earth, And my delights are with the sons of men."
3. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 9, 8 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 99, 97 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

97. and his whole household also received their share of his punishment, because none of them had felt any indignation at his lawless conduct, but had all consented to it, and had all but co-operated actively in his iniquity.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 96-97, 95 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

95. But we must explain what is the enigmatical meaning which he conceals under this prayer, the name of Dan, being interpreted, means "judgment;" therefore he here likens that power of the soul which investigates, and accurately examines, and distinguishes between, and, in some degree, decides on each part of the soul, to a dragon (and the dragon is an animal various in its movements, and exceedingly cunning, and ready to display its courage, and very powerful to repel those who begin acts of violence), but not to that friendly serpent, the counsellor of life, which is wont to be called Eve in his national language, but to the one made by Moses, of the material of brass, which, when those who had been bitten by the poisonous serpents, and who were at the point of death beheld, they are said to have lived and not to have died. XXII.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 3-4, 41-49, 5, 50-51, 53, 57, 6, 61, 63-65, 7-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Why then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV. 10. He also considered this point, in the second place, that it is indispensable that the soul of the man who is about to receive sacred laws should be thoroughly cleansed and purified from all stains, however difficult to be washed out, which the promiscuous multitude of mixed men from all quarters has impregnated cities with;
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 108-113, 124-125, 171, 173-174, 23, 25-27, 34-38, 107 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

107. For this propitiation also is established in the tenth day of the month, when the soul addresses its supplications to the tenth portion, namely to God, and has learnt, by its own sagacity and acuteness, the insignificance and nothingness of the creature, and also the excessive perfection and pre-eminent excellence in all good things of the uncreated God. Therefore God becomes at once propitious, and propitious too, even without any supplications being addressed to him, to those who abase and humble themselves, and who are not puffed up with vain arrogance and self-opinion.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 16-17, 15 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 37, 36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

36. Now of the soul attached to its mother, yielding to the opinions of the many and constantly changing its appearance in accordance with the various forms arising from the manifold and different ways of life, after the manner of the Egyptian Proteus, who was able to assume the likeness of anything in the whole world, and to conceal his real form so as to render it entirely invisible, the most visible image is Jothor, a compound of pride, who evidently represents a city and constitution of men from all quarters, and of all nations, carried away by vain opinions.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 138-139, 149-156, 25, 40, 42-52, 137 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

137. Those also who have inquired what it is that nourishes the soul, for as Moses says, "They knew not what it was," learnt at last and found that it was the word of God and the divine reason, from which flows all kinds of instinctive and everlasting wisdom. This is the heavenly nourishment which the holy scripture indicates, saying, in the character of the cause of all things, "Behold I rain upon you bread from Heaven;
11. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 65 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

65. But the sons of earth removing their minds from contemplation, and becoming deserters so as to fly to the lifeless and immovable nature of the flesh, "for they two became one Flesh," as the lawgiver says, adulterated the excellent coinage, and abandoned the better rank which had been allotted to them as their own, and deserted to the worse rank, which was contrary to their original nature, Nimrod being the first to set the example of this desertion;
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 209-211, 208 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

208. I very much admire Rebecca, who is patience, because she, at that time, recommends the man who is perfect in his soul, and who has destroyed the roughnesses of the passions and vices, to flee and return to Charran; for she says, "Now, therefore, my child, hear my voice, and rise up and depart, and flee away to Laban, my brother, to Charran, and dwell with him certain days, until the anger and rage of thy brother is turned from being against thee, and till he forgets what thou hast done to Him.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 104, 107-108, 111, 115-120, 130-136, 139, 143-144, 147, 152, 103 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

103. And indeed the scriptures at one time call the father-in-law of the first prophets Jother, and at another time Raguel-Jother, when pride is flourishing and at its height; for the name Jother being interpreted means "superfluous," and pride is superfluous in an honest and sincere life, turning into ridicule, as it does, all that is equal and necessary to life, and honouring the unequal things of excess and covetousness.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 152-177, 76, 151 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

151. But since nothing in creation lasts for ever, but all mortal things are liable to inevitable changes and alterations, it was unavoidable that the first man should also undergo some disaster. And the beginning of his life being liable to reproach, was his wife. For, as long as he was single, he resembled, as to his creation, both the world and God; and he represented in his soul the characteristics of the nature of each, I do not mean all of them, but such as a mortal constitution was capable of admitting. But when woman also was created, man perceiving a closely connected figure and a kindred formation to his own, rejoiced at the sight, and approached her and embraced her.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 135, 142-145, 148-149, 153, 33, 77-78, 134 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

134. Now of the four virtues, some are always virgins, and some from having been women become changed into virgins, as Sarah did; "For it had ceased to be with her after the manner of Women," when she began to conceive her happy offspring Isaac. But that which is always a virgin, is that of which Moses says, "And no man whatever knows her." For in truth, it is not permitted to any mortal to pollute incorruptible nature, nor even clearly to comprehend what it is. If indeed he were able by any means to become acquainted with it, he would not cease to hate and regret it;
16. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 12-14, 4, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. And he also added, that she should bring forth his Brother." The addition of one thing is a taking away of some other; as for instance, of particles in arithmetic, and of reasons in the soul. If then we must say that Abel is added, we must also think that Cain is taken away. But that the unusual character of expression may not cause perplexity to many we will endeavour to explain accurately the philosophy which is apparent beneath them, as clearly as may be in our power.
17. Philo of Alexandria, On Sobriety, 36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.46 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.46. therefore his mother, perseverance, that is Rebecca, says to him, "Rise up and flee to Laban, my brother, to Charran, and dwell with him certain Days." Do you not perceive then that the practiser of virtue will not endure to live permanently in the country of the outward senses, but only to remain there a few days and a short time, on account of the necessities of the body to which he is bound? But a longer time and an entire life is allotted to him in the city which is appreciable only by the intellect. IX.
19. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.8, 3.178 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.8. These considerations have come to our ears, having been discussed of old among men of divine spirit and wisdom, who have interpreted the writings of Moses in no superficial or careless manner. But, besides what has been already said, I also look upon circumcision to be a symbol of two things of the most indispensable importance. 3.178. And this is the cause which is often mentioned by many people. But I have heard another also, alleged by persons of high character, who look upon the greater part of the injunctions contained in the law as plain symbols of obscure meanings, and expressed intimations of what may not be expressed. And this other reason alleged is as follows. There are two kinds of soul, much as there are two sexes among human relations; the one a masculine soul, belonging to men; the other a female soul, as found in women. The masculine soul is that which devotes itself to God alone, as the Father and Creator of the universe and the cause of all things that exist; but the female soul is that which depends upon all the things which are created, and as such are liable to destruction, and which puts forth, as it were, the hand of its power in order that in a blind sort of way it may lay hold of whatever comes across it, clinging to a generation which admits of an innumerable quantity of changes and variations, when it ought rather to cleave to the unchangeable, blessed, and thrice happy divine nature.
20. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 208, 55, 199 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

199. Again, who is there who would deny that those men who were born of him who was made out of the earth were noble themselves, and the founders of noble families? persons who have received a birth more excellent than that of any succeeding generation, in being sprung from the first wedded pair, from the first man and woman, who then for the first time came together for the propagation of offspring resembling themselves. But, nevertheless, when there were two persons so born, the elder of them endured to slay the younger; and, having committed the great and most accursed crime of fratricide, he first defiled the ground with human blood.
21. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 68 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

68. And the women also share in this feast, the greater part of whom, though old, are virgins in respect of their purity (not indeed through necessity, as some of the priestesses among the Greeks are, who have been compelled to preserve their chastity more than they would have done of their own accord), but out of an admiration for and love of wisdom, with which they are desirous to pass their lives, on account of which they are indifferent to the pleasures of the body, desiring not a mortal but an immortal offspring, which the soul that is attached to God is alone able to produce by itself and from itself, the Father having sown in it rays of light appreciable only by the intellect, by means of which it will be able to perceive the doctrines of wisdom. IX.
22. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.28, 1.158, 2.258-2.269 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.28. For he never provided his stomach with any luxuries beyond those necessary tributes which nature has appointed to be paid to it, and as to the pleasures of the organs below the stomach he paid no attention to them at all, except as far as the object of having legitimate children was concerned. 1.158. What more shall I say? Has he not also enjoyed an even greater communion with the Father and Creator of the universe, being thought unworthy of being called by the same appellation? For he also was called the god and king of the whole nation, and he is said to have entered into the darkness where God was; that is to say, into the invisible, and shapeless, and incorporeal world, the essence, which is the model of all existing things, where he beheld things invisible to mortal nature; for, having brought himself and his own life into the middle, as an excellently wrought picture, he established himself as a most beautiful and Godlike work, to be a model for all those who were inclined to imitate him. 2.258. This is the beginning and preface of the prophecies of Moses under the influence of inspiration. After this he prophesied about the first and most necessary of all things, namely, food, which the earth did not produce, for it was barren and unfruitful; and the heaven rained down not once only, but every day for forty years, before the dawn of day, an ethereal fruit under the form of a dew very like millet seed. 2.259. And Moses, when he saw it, commanded them to collect it; and being full of inspiration, said: "You must believe in God, inasmuch as you have already had experience of his mercies and benefits in matters beyond all your hopes. This food may not be treasured up or laid up in garners. Let no one leave any portion of it till the morning. 2.261. And Moses, when he saw this, was naturally indigt with those who were thus disobedient; for how could he help being so, when those who had beheld such numerous and great actions which could not possibly be perverted into mere fictitious and well contrived appearances, but which had been easily accomplished by the divine providence, did not only doubt, but even absolutely disbelieved, and were the hardest of all man to be convinced? 2.262. But the Father established the oracle of his prophet by two most conspicuous manifestations, the one of which he gave immediately by the destruction of what had been left, and by the evil stench which arose, and by the change of it into worms, the vilest of animals; and the other demonstration he afforded subsequently, for that which was over and above after that which had been collected by the multitude, was always melted away by the beams of the sun, and consumed, and destroyed in that manner. 2.263. He gave a second instance of his prophetical inspiration not long afterwards in the oracle which he delivered about the sacred seventh day. For though it had had a natural precedence over all other days, not only from the time that the world was created, but even before the origination of the heaven and all the objects perceptible to the outward senses, men still knew it not, perhaps because, by reason of the continued and uninterrupted destructions which had taken place by water and fire, succeeding generations had not been able to receive from former ones any traditions of the arrangement and order which had been established in the connection of preceding times, which, as it was not known, Moses, now being inspired, declared to his people in an oracle which was borne testimony to by a visible sign from heaven. 2.264. And the sign was this. A small portion of food descended from the air on the previous days, but a double portion on the day before the seventh day. And on the previous days, if any portion was left it became liquefied and melted away, until it was entirely changed into dew, and so consumed; but on this day it endured no alteration, but remained in the same state as before, and when this was reported to him, and beheld by him, Moses did not so much conjecture as receive the impulse of divine inspiration under which he prophesied of the seventh day. 2.265. I omit to mention that all such conjectures are akin to prophecy; for the mind could never make such correct and felicitous conjectures, unless it were a divine spirit which guided their feet into the way of truth; 2.266. and the miraculous nature of the sign was shown, not merely in the fact of the food being double in quantity, nor in that of its remaining unimpaired, contrary to the usual customs, but in both these circumstances taking place on the sixth day, from the day on which this food first began to be supplied from heaven, from which day the most sacred number of seven begun to be counted, so that if any one reckons he will find that this heavenly food was given in exact correspondence with the arrangement instituted at the creation of the world. For God began to create the world on the first day of a week of six days: and he began to rain down the food which has just been mentioned on the same first day; 2.267. and the two images are alike; for as he produced that most perfect work, the world, bringing it out of non-existence into existence, so in the same manner did he produce plenty in the wilderness, changing the elements with reference to the pressing necessity, that, instead of the earth, the air might bestow food without labour, and without trouble, to those who had no opportunity of providing themselves with food at their leisure. 2.268. After this he delivered to the people a third oracle of the most marvellous nature, namely that on the seventh day the air would not afford the accustomed food, and that not the very slightest portion would fall upon the earth, as it did on other days; 2.269. and this turned out to be the case in point of fact; for he delivered this prediction on the day before; but some of those who were unstable in their dispositions, went forth to collect it, and being deceived in their expectations, returned unsuccessful, reproaching themselves for their unbelief, and calling the prophet the only true prophet, the only one who knew the will of God, and the only one who had any foreknowledge of what was uncertain and future.
23. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.65, 3.83-3.88, 3.162-3.168, 3.171, 3.217-3.219 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.65. Let us examine the expressions of the writer: "A river," says he, "goes forth out of Eden, to water the Paradise." This river is generic goodness; and this issues forth out of the Eden of the wisdom of God, and that is the word of God. For it is according to the word of God, that generic virtue was created. And generic virtue waters the Paradise: that is to say, it waters the particular virtues. But it does not derive its beginnings from any principle of locality, but from a principle of preeminence. For each of the virtues is really and truly a ruler and a queen. And the expression, "is separated," is equivalent to "is marked off by fixed boundaries;" since wisdom appoints them settled limits with reference to what is to be done. Courage with respect to what is to be endured; temperance with reference to what is to be chosen; and justice in respect of what is to be distributed. XX.
24. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.23-1.53 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

25. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 164 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

164. For it is equality which allotted night and day and light and darkness to existing things. It is equality also that divided the human race into man and woman, making two divisions, unequal in strength, but most perfectly equal for the purpose which nature had principally in view, the generation of a third human being like themselves. For, says Moses, "God made man; in the image of God created he him; male and female he created Them." He no longer says "him," but "them," in the plural number, adapting the species to the genus, which have, as I have already said, been divided with perfect equality. XXXIV.
26. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 45, 30 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

30. And the clearest possible proof of this is, that no one who conversed with Isaac was a mere mortal. Rebecca, that is perseverance, asks her servant, seeing but one person, and having no conception but of one only, "Who is this man who is coming to meet us?" For the soul which perseveres in what is good, is able to comprehend all self-taught wisdom, which is named Isaac, but is not yet able to see God, who is the guide of wisdom.
27. Philo of Alexandria, That God Is Unchangeable, 136 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

136. And the woman who met the prophet, 36 in the book of Kings, resembles this fact: "And she is a widow;" not meaning by that, as we generally use the word, a woman when she is bereft of her husband, but that she is so, from being free from those passions which corrupt and destroy the soul, as Thamar is represented by Moses.
28. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 36 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

36. We must therefore have recourse to allegory, which is a favourite with men capable of seeing through it; for the sacred oracles most evidently conduct us towards and instigate us to the pursuit of it. For they say that in the Paradise there were plants in no respect similar to those which exist among us; but they speak of trees of life, trees of immortality, trees of knowledge, of comprehension, of understanding; trees of the knowledge of good and evil.
29. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 1.52 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.52. 1. Adam and Eve had two sons: the elder of them was named Cain; which name, when it is interpreted, signifies a possession: the younger was Abel, which signifies sorrow. They had also daughters.
30. New Testament, 1 Peter, 3.1-3.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.1. In like manner, wives, be in subjection to your own husbands; so that, even if any don't obey the Word, they may be won by the behavior of their wives without a word; 3.2. seeing your pure behavior in fear. 3.3. Let your beauty be not just the outward adorning of braiding the hair, and of wearing jewels of gold, or of putting on fine clothing; 3.4. but in the hidden person of the heart, in the incorruptible adornment of a gentle and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God very precious. 3.5. For this is how the holy women before, who hoped in God, also adorned themselves, being in subjection to their own husbands: 3.6. as Sarah obeyed Abraham, calling him lord, whose children you now are, if you do well, and are not put in fear by any terror.
31. New Testament, Ephesians, 5.32 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5.32. This mystery is great, but I speak concerning Christ and of the assembly.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abel Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
abraham Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 137, 138, 154
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 375, 555, 563
adultery, jewish Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 541
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 349, 371, 386, 555
allegory Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 99, 134, 138, 154
angel/angelic passim see also archangel, lord, of the Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
anthropology Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
aphrodite Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
ascend, ascension, ascent Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
baer, richard Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
birth, cain, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
body, bodily Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
bread from heaven Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 563
cain Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
children, adam and eve, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
chrysippus Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 134
creation, adam, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
creation, eve, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
daughters Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
double name Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 349
dream, vision Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
emotions, bad Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 375
etymology, greek Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 555
etymology, hebrew Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 375, 555
eve Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 99
exposition of the law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 344
faith Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 563
flight Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
gnosis, gnostic(ism) Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
gnosis, gnostic, gnosticism Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
grant, f. c. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 134
hagar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 563; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 138
hannah Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73
homer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 344
initiation Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
instruction Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
intercourse, sexual Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 371, 375, 386, 555, 563; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 137, 138
ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 555, 563
isis Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
israel, nation/people Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 563
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 375; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 137, 138
jethro Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 344, 349
jordan river Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 371
lamech Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73
law, jewish Hubbard, A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities (2014) 541
law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 349
leah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 349, 375, 386, 555, 563; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 137
light, illumination Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
logos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 563; Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
man Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
menstruation Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73
midian Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 344
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 344, 349, 371; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 137, 138; Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
mysteries, mystery, lesemysterium Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
mystery language Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 134
myth(ological), mythology Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 344, 349
names, improper (catachresis) Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 349
nikiprowetzky, v. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 134
passion Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 138
patriarchal, patriarchy Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
plato, platonic, platonism Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
power Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 371, 563
prophets Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 349
rachel Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 375, 386; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73
rebecca Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 137, 138, 154
repentance, adam, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
reveal, revelation Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 555
riedweg, christoph Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 134
sammael, father of cain, as the Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
sammael Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 349, 371, 375, 386, 555, 563; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 137, 154
seeing Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
septuagint Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
sophia Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256; Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
sophists Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 344
soul, as chariot Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 344
soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 555; Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
stoic(ism) Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
syzygy, synzygos Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
tamar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 371, 386; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73
therapeutrides Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73
twins Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 205
virgin(al), virginity' Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
virgin(al), virginity Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 332
virginity Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 154
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 349, 371, 375, 386, 555; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 137, 138
wisdom Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 92
wisdom (female) Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
woman Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
womanhood Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 138, 154
yhwh, yahweh Nissinen and Uro, Sacred Marriages: The Divine-Human Sexual Metaphor from Sumer to Early Christianity (2008) 256
zipporah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 344, 349, 386; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 73, 137