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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9219
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 3-9


nanSince we see Agar, by whom we understand the middle kind of instruction which is confined to the encyclical system, twice going forth from Sarah, who is the symbol of predominant virtue, and once returning back by the same road, inasmuch as after she had fled the first time, without being banished by her mistress, she returned to see her master's house, having been met by an angel, as the holy scriptures read: but the second time, she is utterly cast out, and is never to be brought back again. II.


nanAnd we must speak of the causes of her first flight, and then again of her second perpetual banishment. Before the names of the two were changed, that is to say, before they had been altered for the better as to the characteristics of their souls, and had been endowed with better dispositions, but while the name of the man was still Abram, or the sublime father, who delighted in the lofty philosophy which investigates the events which take place in the air, and the sublime nature of the beings which exist in heaven, which mathematical science claims for itself as the most excellent part of natural philosophy


nanand the name of the woman was still Sarai; the symbol of my authority, for she is called my authority, and she had not yet changed her nature so as to become generic virtue, and all genus is imperishable, but was as yet classed among things particular and things in species; that is to say, such as the prudence which is in me, the temperance which is in me, the courage, the justice, and so on in the same manner; and these particular virtues are perishable, because the place which receives them, that is to say I, am also perishable.


nanThen Agar, who is the middle kind of encyclical instruction, even if she should endeavour to escape from the austere and stern life of the lovers of virtue, will again return to it, since it is not, as yet, able to receive the generic and imperishable excellencies of virtue, but can only touch the particular virtues, and such as are spoken of in species, in which it is sufficient to attain to mediocrity instead of extreme perfection.


nanBut when Abram, instead of an inquirer into natural philosophy, became a wise man and a lover of God, having his name changed to Abraham, which being interpreted means the great father of sounds; for language when uttered sounds, and the father of language is the mind, which has attained to what is virtuous. And when Sarai instead of being my authority, had her name also changed to Sarah, the meaning of which is princess, and this change is equivalent to becoming generic and imperishable virtue, instead of virtue special and perishable:


nanthen will arise the genus of happiness that is to say, Isaac; and he, when all the feminine Affections have ceased, and when the passion of joy and cheerfulness are dead, will eagerly pursue, not childish amusements, but divine objects; then too those elementary branches of instruction which bear the name of Agar, will be cast out, and their sophistical child will also be cast out, who is named Ishmael. III.


nanAnd they shall undergo eternal banishment, God himself confirming their expulsion, when he bids the wise man obey the word spoken by Sarah, and she urges him expressly to cast out the serving woman and her son; and it is good to be guided by virtue, and especially so when it teaches such lessons as this, that the most perfect natures are very greatly different from the mediocre habits, and that wisdom is a wholly different thing from sophistry; for the one labours to devise what is persuasive for the establishment of a false opinion, which is pernicious to the soul, but wisdom, with long meditation on the truth by the knowledge of right reason, bring real advantage to the intellect.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "17.15" "17.15" "17 15"\n1 "17.19" "17.19" "17 19"\n2 "21.10" "21.10" "21 10"\n3 "29.31" "29.31" "29 31"\n4 1.1 1.1 1 1 \n.. ... ... .. .. \n75 38.22 38.22 38 22 \n76 38.23 38.23 38 23 \n77 38.24 38.24 38 24 \n78 38.25 38.25 38 25 \n79 38.26 38.26 38 26 \n\n[80 rows x 4 columns] (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 18.26-18.30 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

18.26. וְאֶל־הַלְוִיִּם תְּדַבֵּר וְאָמַרְתָּ אֲלֵהֶם כִּי־תִקְחוּ מֵאֵת בְּנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵל אֶת־הַמַּעֲשֵׂר אֲשֶׁר נָתַתִּי לָכֶם מֵאִתָּם בְּנַחֲלַתְכֶם וַהֲרֵמֹתֶם מִמֶּנּוּ תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מַעֲשֵׂר מִן־הַמַּעֲשֵׂר׃ 18.27. וְנֶחְשַׁב לָכֶם תְּרוּמַתְכֶם כַּדָּגָן מִן־הַגֹּרֶן וְכַמְלֵאָה מִן־הַיָּקֶב׃ 18.28. כֵּן תָּרִימוּ גַם־אַתֶּם תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מִכֹּל מַעְשְׂרֹתֵיכֶם אֲשֶׁר תִּקְחוּ מֵאֵת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וּנְתַתֶּם מִמֶּנּוּ אֶת־תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה לְאַהֲרֹן הַכֹּהֵן׃ 18.29. מִכֹּל מַתְּנֹתֵיכֶם תָּרִימוּ אֵת כָּל־תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מִכָּל־חֶלְבּוֹ אֶת־מִקְדְּשׁוֹ מִמֶּנּוּ׃ 18.26. ’Moreover thou shalt speak unto the Levites, and say unto them: When ye take of the children of Israel the tithe which I have given you from them for your inheritance, then ye shall set apart of it a gift for the LORD, even a tithe of the tithe." 18.27. And the gift which ye set apart shall be reckoned unto you, as though it were the corn of the threshing-floor, and as the fulness of the wine-press." 18.28. Thus ye also shall set apart a gift unto the LORD of all your tithes, which ye receive of the children of Israel; and thereof ye shall give the gift which is set apart unto the LORD to Aaron the priest." 18.29. Out of all that is given you ye shall set apart all of that which is due unto the LORD, of all the best thereof, even the hallowed part thereof out of it." 18.30. Therefore thou shalt say unto them: When ye set apart the best thereof from it, then it shall be counted unto the Levites as the increase of the threshing-floor, and as the increase of the wine-press."
3. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 14.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

14.3. הַכֹּל סָר יַחְדָּו נֶאֱלָחוּ אֵין עֹשֵׂה־טוֹב אֵין גַּם־אֶחָד׃ 14.3. They are all corrupt, they are together become impure; there is none that doeth good, no, not one."
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 64, 251 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

251. And that you may have no suspicion of any jealousy on my part, take, if you will, my own handmaid to wife; who is a slave indeed as to her body, but free and noble as to her mind; whose good qualities I have for a long time proved and experienced from the day when she was first introduced into my house, being an Egyptian by blood, and a Hebrew by deliberate choice.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 11, 14-16, 18, 8-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. By means of this husbandry, all the trees of the passions and vices, which soot forth and grow up to a height, bringing forth pernicious fruits, are rooted up, and cut down, and cleared away, so that not even the smallest fragment of them is left, from which any new shoots of evil actions can subsequently spring up.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 10, 12-13, 2, 4, 40-41, 5, 51, 6-9, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. And God cast out Adam, and placed him opposite the paradise of happiness; and he placed there On the Cherubim and a flaming sword, which turned every way, to keep the way of the tree of Life. In this place Moses uses the expression, "He cast out," but previously he said, "He sent out," not using the various expressions at random, but being well aware with reference to what parts he was employing them with propriety and felicity. 1. I have in my former treatises set forth the lives of Moses and the other wise men down to his time, whom the sacred scriptures point out as the founders and leaders of our nation, and as its unwritten laws; I will now, as seems pointed out by the natural order of my subject, proceed to describe accurately the character of those laws which are recorded in writing, not omitting any allegorical meaning which may perchance be concealed beneath the plain language, from that natural love of more recondite and laborious knowledge which is accustomed to seek for what is obscure before, and in preference to, what is evident.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 10-12, 121, 124-125, 13-14, 145, 15-17, 171, 18, 180, 19, 2, 20-27, 3, 34-39, 4, 40-44, 48-49, 5, 50-51, 53, 56-58, 6, 61, 63, 65, 7, 71-79, 8, 80-88, 9, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. But Sarah the wife of Abraham had not borne him any child. And she had an Egyptian handmaiden, who name was Hagar. And Sarah said unto Abraham, Behold, the Lord has closed me up, so that I should not bear children; go in unto my handmaiden that thou mayest have children by Her.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 49, 80-81, 48 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

48. For he thinks that it behoves him to adhere to the classification arising from the consideration of time, according to which, that which is oldest is entitled to priority, and after that, that which is the younger is admitted to a participation in their joint rights. But the practiser in wisdom, knowing that natures are not subject to time, desires what is younger first, and what is older afterwards. And moral reason agrees with him in this matter, for it is necessary for those who practise anything, first of all to come to the more recent learning, in order that after that, they may be able to derive advantage from that which is more perfect.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 150-156, 53, 149 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

149. Nor does he, who is sent forth to search for that virtue which is invincible and embittered against the ridiculous pursuits of men, by name Tamar, find her. And this failure of his is strictly in accordance with nature; for we read in the scripture, "And Judah sent a kid in the hands of his shepherd, the Adullamite, to receive back his pledge from the woman, and he found her not: and he asked the men of the place, Where is the harlot who was in Ae by the wayside? and they said, There is no harlot in this place. And he returned back to Judah, and said unto him, I have not found her, and the men of the place say that there is no harlot there. And Judah said, Let her keep the things, only let me not be made a laughing-stock, I because I have sent the kid, and you because you have not found Her." Oh, the admirable trial! oh, the temptation becoming sacred things!
10. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 63-64, 62 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

62. Accordingly, Abraham, as long as he was abiding in the land of the Chaldaeans, that is to say, in opinion, before he received his new name, and while he was still called Abram, was a man born of heaven, investigating the sublime nature of things on high, and all that took place in these regions, and the causes of them, and studying everything of that kind in the true spirit of philosophy; on which account he received an appellation corresponding to the pursuits to which he devoted himself: for the name Abram, being interpreted, signifies the sublime father, and is a name very fitting for the paternal mind, which in every direction contemplates sublime and heavenly things: for the mind is the father of our composite being, reaching as high as the sky and even farther.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 198-207, 178 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

178. What then shall we say? The Chaldeans appear beyond all other men to have devoted themselves to the study of astronomy and of genealogies; adapting things on earth to things sublime, and also adapting the things of heaven to those on earth, and like people who, availing themselves of the principles of music, exhibit a most perfect symphony as existing in the universe by the common union and sympathy of the parts for one another, which though separated as to place, are not disunited in regard of kindred.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 121-122, 130-136, 139, 143-144, 147, 152, 189-192, 2, 255, 60-80, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. Abraham was ninety and nine years old; and the Lord appeared unto Abraham, and said unto him, I am thy God." The number of nine, when added to the number ninety, is very near to a hundred; in which number the self-taught race shone forth, namely Isaac, the most excellent joy of all enjoyments; for he was born when his father was a hundred years old.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 149-150, 155, 69-71, 148 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

148. And with great beauty Moses has attributed the giving of names to the different animals to the first created man, for it is a work of wisdom and indicative of royal authority, and man was full of intuitive wisdom and self-taught, having been created by the grace of God, and, moreover, was a king. And it is proper for a ruler to give names to each of his subjects. And, as was very natural, the power of domination was excessive in that first-created man, whom God formed with great care and thought worthy of the second rank in the creation, making him his own viceroy and the ruler of all other creatures. Since even those who have been born so many generations afterwards, when the race is becoming weakened by reason of the long intervals of time that have elapsed since the beginning of the world, do still exert the same power over the irrational beasts, preserving as it were a spark of the dominion and power which has been handed down to them by succession from their first ancestor.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On Planting, 46 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 130 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

130. And of what kind they are, he proceeds to show in a few words, deriving his explanation from the natural things of art; for he introduces Agar as filling a leathern bag with water, and giving her child Drink. Now Agar is the handmaid of Sarah, the new dispensation of perfect virtue; and she is correctly represented so. Since, therefore, having come to the depth of knowledge, which Moses here calls a well, she draws up (filling the soul as if it were a vessel) the doctrines and speculations which she is in pursuit of, wishing to feed her child on the things on which she herself is fed.
16. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 121 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

121. and the law is a witness to this which in the great hymn speaks thus--"He was fat, he was rich, he was exceeding broad, and he forsook God who had made him, and he forgot God his Saviour." For in truth those men whose lives have been exceedingly fortunate and are so at the time, do not remember the eternal God, but they think time their god;
17. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 43 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

43. And he learnt all these things from Abraham his grandfather, who was the author of his own education, who gave to the all-wise Isaac all that he had, leaving none of his substance to bastards, or to the spurious reasonings of concubines, but he gives them small gifts, as being inconsiderable persons. For the possessions of which he is possessed, namely, the perfect virtues, belong only to the perfect and legitimate son; but those which are of an intermediate character, are suitable to and fall to the share of those who are not perfect, but who have advanced as far as the encyclical branches of elementary education, of which Agar and Cheturah partake, Agar meaning "a dwelling near," and Cheturah meaning "sacrificing.
18. Philo of Alexandria, On Sobriety, 8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.73, 1.240 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.73. And do not wonder if, according to the rules of allegorical description, the sun is likened to the Father and Governor of the universe; for in reality nothing is like unto God; but those things which by the vain opinion of men are thought to be so, are only two things, one invisible and the other visible; the soul being the invisible thing, and the sun the visible one. 1.240. Do you not see that encyclical instruction, that is, Hagar, says to the angel, "Art thou God who seest Me?" for she was not capable of beholding the most ancient cause, inasmuch as she was by birth a native of Egypt. But now the mind begins to be improved, so as to be able to contemplate the governor of all the powers;
20. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 3.1, 3.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.1. There was once a time when, devoting my leisure to philosophy and to the contemplation of the world and the things in it, I reaped the fruit of excellent, and desirable, and blessed intellectual feelings, being always living among the divine oracles and doctrines, on which I fed incessantly and insatiably, to my great delight, never entertaining any low or grovelling thoughts, nor ever wallowing in the pursuit of glory or wealth, or the delights of the body, but I appeared to be raised on high and borne aloft by a certain inspiration of the soul, and to dwell in the regions of the sun and moon, and to associate with the whole heaven, and the whole universal world. 3.6. But even in these circumstances I ought to give thanks to God, that though I am so overwhelmed by this flood, I am not wholly sunk and swallowed up in the depths. But I open the eyes of my soul, which from an utter despair of any good hope had been believed to have been before now wholly darkened, and I am irradiated with the light of wisdom, since I am not given up for the whole of my life to darkness. Behold, therefore, I venture not only to study the sacred commands of Moses, but also with an ardent love of knowledge to investigate each separate one of them, and to endeavour to reveal and to explain to those who wish to understand them, things concerning them which are not known to the multitude.II.
21. Philo of Alexandria, Against Flaccus, 151, 181, 105 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

105. for some men of those who, in the time of Tiberius, and of Caesar his father, had the government, seeking to convert their governorship and viceroyalty into a sovereignty and tyranny, filled all the country with intolerable evils, with corruption, and rapine, and condemnation of persons who had done no wrong, and with banishment and exile of such innocent men, and with the slaughter of the nobles without a trial; and then, after the appointed period of their government had expired, when they returned to Rome, the emperors exacted of them an account and relation of all that they had done, especially if by chance the cities which they had been oppressing sent any embassy to complain;
22. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 341, 110 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

110. Is it fitting now to compare with these oracles of Apollo the ill-omened warning of Gaius, by means of which poverty, and dishonour, and banishment, and death were given premature notice of to all those who were in power and authority in any part of the world? What connexion or resemblance was there between him and Apollo, when he never paid any attention to any ties of kindred or friendship? Let him cease, then, this pretended Apollo, from imitating that real healer of mankind, for the form of God is not a thing which is capable of being imitated by an inferior one, as good money is imitated by bad. XV.
23. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.63-1.67, 1.96, 2.14-2.15, 2.89-2.90, 3.1, 3.39, 3.42-3.43, 3.83-3.87, 3.217-3.219, 3.244-3.245 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.63. And a river goes forth out of Eden to water the Paradise. From thence it is separated into four heads: the name of the one is Pheison. That is the one which encircles the whole land of Evilat. There is the country where there is gold, and the gold of that land is good. There also are the carbuncle and the sapphire stone. And the name of the second river is Gihon; this is that which encircles the whole land of Ethiopia. And the third river is the Tigris. This is the river which flows in front of the Assyrians. And the fourth river is the Euphrates." In these words Moses intends to sketch out the particular virtues. And they also are four in number, prudence, temperance, courage, and justice. Now the greatest river from which the four branches flow off, is generic virtue, which we have already called goodness; and the four branches are the same number of virtues. 1.64. Generic virtue, therefore, derives its beginning from Eden, which is the wisdom of God; which rejoices and exults, and triumphs, being delighted at and honoured on account of nothing else, except its Father, God, and the four particular virtues, are branches from the generic virtue, which like a river waters all the good actions of each, with an abundant stream of benefits. 1.65. Let us examine the expressions of the writer: "A river," says he, "goes forth out of Eden, to water the Paradise." This river is generic goodness; and this issues forth out of the Eden of the wisdom of God, and that is the word of God. For it is according to the word of God, that generic virtue was created. And generic virtue waters the Paradise: that is to say, it waters the particular virtues. But it does not derive its beginnings from any principle of locality, but from a principle of preeminence. For each of the virtues is really and truly a ruler and a queen. And the expression, "is separated," is equivalent to "is marked off by fixed boundaries;" since wisdom appoints them settled limits with reference to what is to be done. Courage with respect to what is to be endured; temperance with reference to what is to be chosen; and justice in respect of what is to be distributed. XX. 1.66. The name of one river is Pheison. This is that river which encircles all the land of Evilat; there is the country where there is gold. And the gold of that land is good; there also are the carbuncle and the sapphire stone." One of the four virtues is prudence, which Moses here calls Pheison: because the soul abstains, from, and guards against, acts of iniquity. And it meanders in a circle, and flows all round the land of Evilat; that is to say, it preserves a mild, and gentle, and favourable constitution. And as of all fusible essences, the most excellent and the most illustrious is gold, so also the virtue of the soul which enjoys the highest reputation, is prudence. 1.67. And when he uses the expression, "that is the country where there is gold," he is not speaking geographically, that is, where gold exists, but that is the country in which that valuable possession exists, brilliant as gold, tried in the fire, and valuable, namely, prudence. And this is confessed to be the most valuable possession of God. But with reference to the geographical position of virtue, there are two personages, each invested with distinctive qualities. One, the being who has prudence, the other, the being who exerts it; and these he likens to the carbuncle and the emerald. XXI. 1.96. On which account, when he is driven out of Paradise, Moses repeats the same names; for he says, "And the Lord God sent him forth out of the Paradise of happiness, to till the ground from which he had been Taken." That, since the Lord had laid his commands on him as his Master, and God as his Benefactor, he might now, in both these characters, chastise him for having disobeyed them; for thus, by the same power by which he had exhorted him does he also banish him, now that he is disobedient. XXXI.
24. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.20-1.21 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

25. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 124-125, 66, 123 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

123. But by this is meant wickedness, which is established in the souls of foolish men; the remedy for which (as one seeks for remedies for a severe disease) is found to be the just man, who is in possession of the panacea, justice. When, therefore, he has repelled these evils he is filled with joy, as also is Sarah; for she says, "The Lord hath caused me laughter;" and she adds further, "so that whosoever hears it shall rejoice with Me.
26. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 167-169, 126 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

126. And Moses very appropriately says that the fruit of education is not only holy but also praised; for every one of the virtues is a holy thing, but most especially is gratitude holy; but it is impossible to show gratitude to God in a genuine manner, by those means which people in general think the only ones, namely offerings and sacrifices; for the whole world could not be a temple worthy to be raised to his honour, except by means of praises and hymns, and those too must be such as are sung, not by loud voices, but by the invisible and pure mind, which shall raise the shout and song to him.
27. New Testament, Romans, 3.9-3.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.9. What then? Are we better than they? No, in no way. For we previously charged both Jews and Greeks, that they are all under sin. 3.10. As it is written, "There is no one righteous. No, not one. 3.11. There is no one who understands. There is no one who seeks after God. 3.12. They have all turned aside. They have together become unprofitable. There is no one who does good, No, not, so much as one. 3.13. Their throat is an open tomb. With their tongues they have used deceit." "The poison of vipers is under their lips; 3.14. Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness. 3.15. Their feet are swift to shed blood. 3.16. Destruction and misery are in their ways. 3.17. The way of peace, they haven't known. 3.18. There is no fear of God before their eyes. 3.19. Now we know that whatever things the law says, it speaks to those who are under the law, that every mouth may be closed, and all the world may be brought under the judgment of God. 3.20. Because by the works of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight. For through the law comes the knowledge of sin.
28. New Testament, Matthew, 1.11-1.12, 1.17, 24.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.11. Josiah became the father of Jechoniah and his brothers, at the time of the exile to Babylon. 1.12. After the exile to Babylon, Jechoniah became the father of Shealtiel. Shealtiel became the father of Zerubbabel. 1.17. So all the generations from Abraham to David are fourteen generations; from David to the exile to Babylon fourteen generations; and from the carrying away to Babylon to the Christ, fourteen generations. 24.20. Pray that your flight will not be in the winter, nor on a Sabbath


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aaron, as speech/logos prophorikos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510
abraham Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
abram/abraham, analogue to odysseus Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
abram/abraham, as type of soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 272
abram/abraham, change of name Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243, 266, 267, 272
abram/abraham, fall Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
abram/abraham, migration Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
abram/abraham, prayer for ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510, 511, 512
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 272
alexandria Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9, 138, 139, 241, 243, 266, 267, 272, 386, 402, 414, 510, 511
allegory/allegoresis, etymology in/vs. Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 571
allegory/allegoresis, homeric parallels Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
allegory/allegoresis, of the soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
allegory/allegoresis, pedagogical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
allegory/allegoresis, platonist parallels Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
allegory/allegoresis Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 267, 272
allegory Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
archangel Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
arithmology, ten Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
ascend, ascension, ascent Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90
astronomy Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90, 91
attributes, divine, eternal Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 512
balaam Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 511
banishment Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
benjamin Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241
blindness Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 91
body Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 511
cain Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
claudius, roman emperor, expulsion of jews from rome by Feldman, Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered (2006) 696
commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9
cycle, patriarchal, abrahamic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9
cycle, patriarchal, adamic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 9
cycle, patriarchal, noahic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 9
dance, dancing Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90
ecstasis, ecstasy, ecstatic, ex stasis Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90
education Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 571
emotions, bad Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139
emotions, good Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139, 214
emotions Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139
entrance Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
epicureanism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
etymology, greek Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 272
etymology, hebrew Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 266, 276, 277, 512
exile Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
exposition of the law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402, 414
expulsion, adam, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
expulsion, eve, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
eye Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 91
faith Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
fall, epistemic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
fate, ill-fated Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
flesh Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 267
flight Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90
god, face of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
grace Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
hagar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 277, 402, 511; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 125, 151
homer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
hope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
initiation Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 91
instruction Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90, 91
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139, 214, 272, 276, 386, 402, 414, 571
ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510, 511, 512, 571
isis Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 91
israel, nation/people Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
israel, seer of god Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 512
jacob, practicer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 512
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9, 241, 511, 512
jethro Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
joseph Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 511
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139, 276, 414, 571
laughter Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139, 414
law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139, 510
leah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
lemma, main/primary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 9
levite Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
light, illumination Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 91
logos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243, 511, 512
many-named, prophet Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 267
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 267, 276, 510, 512; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
mysteries, mystery, lesemysterium Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90, 91
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243, 266, 267, 272, 276, 277
names, divine (lack of) Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
names, philosophy of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
nn. Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90, 91
odysseus Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
onomasticon Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 272
paradise, traveling (journey or foray) to/from Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
penelope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
pentateuch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 243, 512
perfection Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 243, 276, 511
philosopher, philosophical, philosophy Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90, 91
piety Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
plato, platonic, platonism Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
plutarch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
practice Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 91
prayers, moses, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
preliminary studies Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277, 511
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402, 414
qge Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402, 414
quarrelsome exegetes Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243, 266, 267
rachel Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
regions, paradise, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
restoration Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
reuben Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 511, 512
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 402, 510, 511, 571
ritual Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 91
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 241, 272, 276, 277, 386, 402, 414, 511; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
sophia Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 91
sophists Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510, 511, 571
soul Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90, 91
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 266
sun, moon Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 90
tamar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
technique, rhetorical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
time Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
tithe, levitical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
virginity Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
virtue, as queen Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 276
virtue, cardinal Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402
virtue, specific/generic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 267, 272, 277, 386, 402, 571; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
wickedness Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
wisdom' Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510
wisdom Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 138, 214, 272, 277, 512; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
zipporah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386