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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9219
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 10


nanWhy then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

31 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 10.9, 18.2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10.9. עַל־כֵּן לֹא־הָיָה לְלֵוִי חֵלֶק וְנַחֲלָה עִם־אֶחָיו יְהוָה הוּא נַחֲלָתוֹ כַּאֲשֶׁר דִּבֶּר יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ לוֹ׃ 18.2. אַךְ הַנָּבִיא אֲשֶׁר יָזִיד לְדַבֵּר דָּבָר בִּשְׁמִי אֵת אֲשֶׁר לֹא־צִוִּיתִיו לְדַבֵּר וַאֲשֶׁר יְדַבֵּר בְּשֵׁם אֱלֹהִים אֲחֵרִים וּמֵת הַנָּבִיא הַהוּא׃ 18.2. וְנַחֲלָה לֹא־יִהְיֶה־לּוֹ בְּקֶרֶב אֶחָיו יְהוָה הוּא נַחֲלָתוֹ כַּאֲשֶׁר דִּבֶּר־לוֹ׃ 10.9. Wherefore Levi hath no portion nor inheritance with his brethren; the LORD is his inheritance, according as the LORD thy God spoke unto him.—" 18.2. And they shall have no inheritance among their brethren; the LORD is their inheritance, as He hath spoken unto them."
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "17.15" "17.15" "17 15"\n1 "17.19" "17.19" "17 19"\n2 "21.10" "21.10" "21 10"\n3 "29.31" "29.31" "29 31"\n4 1.1 1.1 1 1 \n.. ... ... .. .. \n76 38.22 38.22 38 22 \n77 38.23 38.23 38 23 \n78 38.24 38.24 38 24 \n79 38.25 38.25 38 25 \n80 38.26 38.26 38 26 \n\n[81 rows x 4 columns] (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 18.26-18.30 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

18.26. וְאֶל־הַלְוִיִּם תְּדַבֵּר וְאָמַרְתָּ אֲלֵהֶם כִּי־תִקְחוּ מֵאֵת בְּנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵל אֶת־הַמַּעֲשֵׂר אֲשֶׁר נָתַתִּי לָכֶם מֵאִתָּם בְּנַחֲלַתְכֶם וַהֲרֵמֹתֶם מִמֶּנּוּ תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מַעֲשֵׂר מִן־הַמַּעֲשֵׂר׃ 18.27. וְנֶחְשַׁב לָכֶם תְּרוּמַתְכֶם כַּדָּגָן מִן־הַגֹּרֶן וְכַמְלֵאָה מִן־הַיָּקֶב׃ 18.28. כֵּן תָּרִימוּ גַם־אַתֶּם תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מִכֹּל מַעְשְׂרֹתֵיכֶם אֲשֶׁר תִּקְחוּ מֵאֵת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וּנְתַתֶּם מִמֶּנּוּ אֶת־תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה לְאַהֲרֹן הַכֹּהֵן׃ 18.29. מִכֹּל מַתְּנֹתֵיכֶם תָּרִימוּ אֵת כָּל־תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מִכָּל־חֶלְבּוֹ אֶת־מִקְדְּשׁוֹ מִמֶּנּוּ׃ 18.26. ’Moreover thou shalt speak unto the Levites, and say unto them: When ye take of the children of Israel the tithe which I have given you from them for your inheritance, then ye shall set apart of it a gift for the LORD, even a tithe of the tithe." 18.27. And the gift which ye set apart shall be reckoned unto you, as though it were the corn of the threshing-floor, and as the fulness of the wine-press." 18.28. Thus ye also shall set apart a gift unto the LORD of all your tithes, which ye receive of the children of Israel; and thereof ye shall give the gift which is set apart unto the LORD to Aaron the priest." 18.29. Out of all that is given you ye shall set apart all of that which is due unto the LORD, of all the best thereof, even the hallowed part thereof out of it." 18.30. Therefore thou shalt say unto them: When ye set apart the best thereof from it, then it shall be counted unto the Levites as the increase of the threshing-floor, and as the increase of the wine-press."
4. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 14.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

14.3. הַכֹּל סָר יַחְדָּו נֶאֱלָחוּ אֵין עֹשֵׂה־טוֹב אֵין גַּם־אֶחָד׃ 14.3. They are all corrupt, they are together become impure; there is none that doeth good, no, not one."
5. Hebrew Bible, Isaiah, 41.7 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

41.7. וַיְחַזֵּק חָרָשׁ אֶת־צֹרֵף מַחֲלִיק פַּטִּישׁ אֶת־הוֹלֶם פָּעַם אֹמֵר לַדֶּבֶק טוֹב הוּא וַיְחַזְּקֵהוּ בְמַסְמְרִים לֹא יִמּוֹט׃ 41.7. So the carpenter encouraged the goldsmith, And he that smootheth with the hammer him that smiteth the anvil, Saying of the soldering: ‘It is good’; And he fastened it with nails, that it should not be moved."
6. Septuagint, 1 Maccabees, 1.20-1.21, 1.31, 2.1, 5.12, 7.5, 9.4, 9.7, 13.12, 14.41 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

1.20. After subduing Egypt, Antiochus returned in the one hundred and forty-third year. He went up against Israel and came to Jerusalem with a strong force. 1.21. He arrogantly entered the sanctuary and took the golden altar, the lampstand for the light, and all its utensils. 1.31. He plundered the city, burned it with fire, and tore down its houses and its surrounding walls. 2.1. In those days Mattathias the son of John, son of Simeon, a priest of the sons of Joarib, moved from Jerusalem and settled in Modein. 5.12. Now then come and rescue us from their hands, for many of us have fallen 7.5. Then there came to him all the lawless and ungodly men of Israel; they were led by Alcimus, who wanted to be high priest. 9.4. then they marched off and went to Berea with twenty thousand foot soldiers and two thousand cavalry. 9.7. When Judas saw that his army had slipped away and the battle was imminent, he was crushed in spirit, for he had no time to assemble them. 13.12. Then Trypho departed from Ptolemais with a large army to invade the land of Judah, and Jonathan was with him under guard. 14.41. And the Jews and their priests decided that Simon should be their leader and high priest for ever, until a trustworthy prophet should arise
7. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 38.25 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

38.25. How can he become wise who handles the plow,and who glories in the shaft of a goad,who drives oxen and is occupied with their work,and whose talk is about bulls?
8. Septuagint, Judith, 2.15, 12.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 0th cent. CE)

2.15. and mustered the picked troops by divisions as his lord had ordered him to do, one hundred and twenty thousand of them, together with twelve thousand archers on horseback 12.1. Then he commanded them to bring her in where his silver dishes were kept, and ordered them to set a table for her with some of his own food and to serve her with his own wine.
9. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 16.18 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

16.18. At one time the flame was restrained,so that it might not consume the creatures sent against the ungodly,but that seeing this they might know that they were being pursued by the judgment of God;
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 99, 251 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

251. And that you may have no suspicion of any jealousy on my part, take, if you will, my own handmaid to wife; who is a slave indeed as to her body, but free and noble as to her mind; whose good qualities I have for a long time proved and experienced from the day when she was first introduced into my house, being an Egyptian by blood, and a Hebrew by deliberate choice.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 11, 14-16, 8-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. By means of this husbandry, all the trees of the passions and vices, which soot forth and grow up to a height, bringing forth pernicious fruits, are rooted up, and cut down, and cleared away, so that not even the smallest fragment of them is left, from which any new shoots of evil actions can subsequently spring up.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 13, 2-4, 40-41, 5, 51, 6-9, 12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Now the first example of an enemy placed directly in front of one is derived from what is said in the case of Cain, that "he went out from the face of God, and dwelt in the land of Nod, in the front of Eden." Now Nod being interpreted means commotion, and Eden means delight. The one therefore is a symbol of wickedness agitating the soul, and the other of virtue which creates for the soul a state of tranquillity and happiness, not meaning by happiness that effeminate luxury which is derived from the indulgence of the irrational passion of pleasure, but a joy free from toil and free from hardship, which is enjoyed with great tranquillity. 12. in this manner those who are skilful in the art of medicine, save their patients; for they do not think it advisable to give food before they have removed the causes of their diseases; for while the diseases remain, food is useless, being the pernicious materials of their sufferings. III.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. And there is also another story akin to this, related by the deviser of fables, concerning the sameness of language existing among animals: for they say that formerly, all the animals in the world, whether land animals, or aquatic ones, or winged ones, had but one language, and that, just as among men Greeks speak the same language as Greeks, and the present race of barbarians speaks the same language as barbarians, exactly in the same manner every animal was able to converse with every other animal with which it might meet, and with which it did anything, or from which it suffered anything, so that they sympathised with one another at their mutual misfortunes, and rejoiced whenever any of them met with any good fortune;
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 10-12, 124-125, 13, 139, 14, 140-141, 15, 154, 16-17, 171, 18, 180, 19, 2, 20-27, 3, 34-39, 4, 40-44, 48-49, 5, 50-51, 53, 56-58, 6, 61, 63, 65, 7, 71-79, 8, 80-88, 9, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. But Sarah the wife of Abraham had not borne him any child. And she had an Egyptian handmaiden, who name was Hagar. And Sarah said unto Abraham, Behold, the Lord has closed me up, so that I should not bear children; go in unto my handmaiden that thou mayest have children by Her.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 150-156, 149 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

149. Nor does he, who is sent forth to search for that virtue which is invincible and embittered against the ridiculous pursuits of men, by name Tamar, find her. And this failure of his is strictly in accordance with nature; for we read in the scripture, "And Judah sent a kid in the hands of his shepherd, the Adullamite, to receive back his pledge from the woman, and he found her not: and he asked the men of the place, Where is the harlot who was in Ae by the wayside? and they said, There is no harlot in this place. And he returned back to Judah, and said unto him, I have not found her, and the men of the place say that there is no harlot there. And Judah said, Let her keep the things, only let me not be made a laughing-stock, I because I have sent the kid, and you because you have not found Her." Oh, the admirable trial! oh, the temptation becoming sacred things!
16. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 63-64, 62 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

62. Accordingly, Abraham, as long as he was abiding in the land of the Chaldaeans, that is to say, in opinion, before he received his new name, and while he was still called Abram, was a man born of heaven, investigating the sublime nature of things on high, and all that took place in these regions, and the causes of them, and studying everything of that kind in the true spirit of philosophy; on which account he received an appellation corresponding to the pursuits to which he devoted himself: for the name Abram, being interpreted, signifies the sublime father, and is a name very fitting for the paternal mind, which in every direction contemplates sublime and heavenly things: for the mind is the father of our composite being, reaching as high as the sky and even farther.
17. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 198-207, 156 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 121-122, 130-136, 139, 143-144, 147, 152, 189-192, 2, 255, 60-80, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. Abraham was ninety and nine years old; and the Lord appeared unto Abraham, and said unto him, I am thy God." The number of nine, when added to the number ninety, is very near to a hundred; in which number the self-taught race shone forth, namely Isaac, the most excellent joy of all enjoyments; for he was born when his father was a hundred years old.
19. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 149-150, 155, 148 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

148. And with great beauty Moses has attributed the giving of names to the different animals to the first created man, for it is a work of wisdom and indicative of royal authority, and man was full of intuitive wisdom and self-taught, having been created by the grace of God, and, moreover, was a king. And it is proper for a ruler to give names to each of his subjects. And, as was very natural, the power of domination was excessive in that first-created man, whom God formed with great care and thought worthy of the second rank in the creation, making him his own viceroy and the ruler of all other creatures. Since even those who have been born so many generations afterwards, when the race is becoming weakened by reason of the long intervals of time that have elapsed since the beginning of the world, do still exert the same power over the irrational beasts, preserving as it were a spark of the dominion and power which has been handed down to them by succession from their first ancestor.
20. Philo of Alexandria, On Planting, 46 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Philo of Alexandria, On Sobriety, 9, 8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

22. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.73, 1.240 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.73. And do not wonder if, according to the rules of allegorical description, the sun is likened to the Father and Governor of the universe; for in reality nothing is like unto God; but those things which by the vain opinion of men are thought to be so, are only two things, one invisible and the other visible; the soul being the invisible thing, and the sun the visible one. 1.240. Do you not see that encyclical instruction, that is, Hagar, says to the angel, "Art thou God who seest Me?" for she was not capable of beholding the most ancient cause, inasmuch as she was by birth a native of Egypt. But now the mind begins to be improved, so as to be able to contemplate the governor of all the powers;
23. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.63-1.67, 1.96, 2.14-2.15, 2.82, 3.1, 3.39, 3.42-3.43, 3.83-3.87, 3.217-3.219, 3.244-3.245 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.63. And a river goes forth out of Eden to water the Paradise. From thence it is separated into four heads: the name of the one is Pheison. That is the one which encircles the whole land of Evilat. There is the country where there is gold, and the gold of that land is good. There also are the carbuncle and the sapphire stone. And the name of the second river is Gihon; this is that which encircles the whole land of Ethiopia. And the third river is the Tigris. This is the river which flows in front of the Assyrians. And the fourth river is the Euphrates." In these words Moses intends to sketch out the particular virtues. And they also are four in number, prudence, temperance, courage, and justice. Now the greatest river from which the four branches flow off, is generic virtue, which we have already called goodness; and the four branches are the same number of virtues. 1.64. Generic virtue, therefore, derives its beginning from Eden, which is the wisdom of God; which rejoices and exults, and triumphs, being delighted at and honoured on account of nothing else, except its Father, God, and the four particular virtues, are branches from the generic virtue, which like a river waters all the good actions of each, with an abundant stream of benefits. 1.65. Let us examine the expressions of the writer: "A river," says he, "goes forth out of Eden, to water the Paradise." This river is generic goodness; and this issues forth out of the Eden of the wisdom of God, and that is the word of God. For it is according to the word of God, that generic virtue was created. And generic virtue waters the Paradise: that is to say, it waters the particular virtues. But it does not derive its beginnings from any principle of locality, but from a principle of preeminence. For each of the virtues is really and truly a ruler and a queen. And the expression, "is separated," is equivalent to "is marked off by fixed boundaries;" since wisdom appoints them settled limits with reference to what is to be done. Courage with respect to what is to be endured; temperance with reference to what is to be chosen; and justice in respect of what is to be distributed. XX. 1.66. The name of one river is Pheison. This is that river which encircles all the land of Evilat; there is the country where there is gold. And the gold of that land is good; there also are the carbuncle and the sapphire stone." One of the four virtues is prudence, which Moses here calls Pheison: because the soul abstains, from, and guards against, acts of iniquity. And it meanders in a circle, and flows all round the land of Evilat; that is to say, it preserves a mild, and gentle, and favourable constitution. And as of all fusible essences, the most excellent and the most illustrious is gold, so also the virtue of the soul which enjoys the highest reputation, is prudence. 1.67. And when he uses the expression, "that is the country where there is gold," he is not speaking geographically, that is, where gold exists, but that is the country in which that valuable possession exists, brilliant as gold, tried in the fire, and valuable, namely, prudence. And this is confessed to be the most valuable possession of God. But with reference to the geographical position of virtue, there are two personages, each invested with distinctive qualities. One, the being who has prudence, the other, the being who exerts it; and these he likens to the carbuncle and the emerald. XXI. 1.96. On which account, when he is driven out of Paradise, Moses repeats the same names; for he says, "And the Lord God sent him forth out of the Paradise of happiness, to till the ground from which he had been Taken." That, since the Lord had laid his commands on him as his Master, and God as his Benefactor, he might now, in both these characters, chastise him for having disobeyed them; for thus, by the same power by which he had exhorted him does he also banish him, now that he is disobedient. XXXI.
24. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.20-1.21, 4.11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

25. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 258 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

258. An instance of the fourth kind of trance is the one which we are now considering: "And about the setting of the sun a trance fell upon Abraham," he being thrown into a state of enthusiasm and inspired by the Deity. But this is not the only thing which shows him to have been a prophet, but also the express words which are engraven in the sacred scriptures as on a pillar. When some one endeavored to separate Sarah, that is, the virtue which is derived from nature, from him, as if she had not been the peculiar property of the wise man alone, but had also belonged to every one who made any pretence to wisdom, God said, "Give the man back his wife, because he is a prophet, and he will pray for thee, and thou shalt Live;
26. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 124-125, 59, 123 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

123. But by this is meant wickedness, which is established in the souls of foolish men; the remedy for which (as one seeks for remedies for a severe disease) is found to be the just man, who is in possession of the panacea, justice. When, therefore, he has repelled these evils he is filled with joy, as also is Sarah; for she says, "The Lord hath caused me laughter;" and she adds further, "so that whosoever hears it shall rejoice with Me.
27. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 168-169, 167 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

167. And besides all this, we must likewise add, that we are not speaking of a stern-looking and sordid kind of wisdom, contracted by profound thought and ill-humour; but, on the other hand, of that wisdom which wears on tranquil and cheerful appearance, being full of joy and happiness, by which men have often been led on to sport and divert themselves in no inelegant manner, indulging in amusements suitable to their dignified and earnest character, just as in a well-tuned lyre one may have a combination uniting, by means of opposite sounds, in one melodious harmony.
28. Anon., The Life of Adam And Eve, 28.2-28.4, 29.4-29.5 (1st cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

29. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 2.298, 3.120, 4.53, 5.167, 7.4, 10.26-10.27, 10.78 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.298. Now, when the Egyptians were under the oppression of these miseries, the king ordered Moses to take the Hebrews with him, and be gone. Upon which the whole multitude of the frogs vanished away; and both the land and the river returned to their former natures. 4.53. And truly, any one would lament them, not only on account of this calamity that befell them, which yet deserves our commiseration, but also because their kindred were pleased with their sufferings; for they forgot the relation they bare to them, and at the sight of this sad accident approved of the judgment given against them; and because they looked upon the people about Dathan as pestilent men, they thought they perished as such, and did not grieve for them. 5.167. So the ambassadors lamented not only the disaster that had befallen the Benjamites, but themselves also, by this destruction of their kindred; and persuaded them to take it patiently; and to come and unite with them, and not, so far as in them lay, to give their suffrage to the utter destruction of the tribe of Benjamin; and said to them, “We give you leave to take the whole land of Benjamin to yourselves, and as much prey as you are able to carry away with you.” 7.4. He also produced demonstrations that the king was slain, which were the golden bracelets that had been on the king’s arms, and his crown, which he had taken away from Saul’s dead body, and had brought them to him. So David having no longer any room to call in question the truth of what he said, but seeing most evident marks that Saul was dead, he rent his garments, and continued all that day with his companions in weeping and lamentation. 7.4. for he took care not to appear to have had any hand in this murder, contrary to the assurances he had given and the oaths he had taken to Abner. However, he commanded all the people to weep and lament this man, and to honor his dead body with the usual solemnities; that is, by rending their garments, and putting on sackcloth, and that things should be the habit in which they should go before the bier; 10.26. Now when his enemies saw that Daniel had suffered nothing which was terrible, they would not own that he was preserved by God, and by his providence; but they said that the lions had been filled full with food, and on that account it was, as they supposed, that the lions would not touch Daniel, nor come to him; and this they alleged to the king. 10.26. o he was troubled at the thoughts of this his condition, and lamented himself, and entreated of God that he would prolong his life for a little while till he had some children, and not suffer him to depart this life before he was become a father. 10.27. He also related, that when he stood up, he was shown a great rain, with many horns growing out of his head, and that the last was higher than the rest: that after this he looked to the west, and saw a he-goat carried through the air from that quarter; that he rushed upon the ram with violence, and smote him twice with his horns, and overthrew him to the ground, and trampled upon him: 10.27. Hereupon God had mercy upon him, and accepted of his supplication, because the trouble he was under at his supposed death was not because he was soon to leave the advantages he enjoyed in the kingdom, nor did he on that account pray that he might have a longer life afforded him, but in order to have sons, that might receive the government after him. And God sent Isaiah the prophet, and commanded him to inform Hezekiah, that within three days’ time he should get clear of his distemper, and should survive it fifteen years, and that he should have children also. 10.78. But all the people mourned greatly for him, lamenting and grieving on his account many days; and Jeremiah the prophet composed an elegy to lament him, which is extant till this time also.
30. New Testament, Galatians, 4.21-4.31 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.21. Tell me, you that desire to be under the law, don't you listen to thelaw? 4.22. For it is written that Abraham had two sons, one by thehandmaid, and one by the free woman. 4.23. However, the son by thehandmaid was born according to the flesh, but the son by the free womanwas born through promise. 4.24. These things contain an allegory, forthese are two covets. One is from Mount Sinai, bearing children tobondage, which is Hagar. 4.25. For this Hagar is Mount Sinai inArabia, and answers to the Jerusalem that exists now, for she is inbondage with her children. 4.26. But the Jerusalem that is above isfree, which is the mother of us all. 4.27. For it is written,"Rejoice, you barren who don't bear. Break forth and shout, you that don't travail. For more are the children of the desolate than of her who has a husband. 4.28. Now we, brothers, as Isaac was, are children of promise. 4.29. But as then, he who was born according to the flesh persecutedhim who was born according to the Spirit, so also it is now. 4.30. However what does the Scripture say? "Throw out the handmaid and herson, for the son of the handmaid will not inherit with the son of thefree woman. 4.31. So then, brothers, we are not children of ahandmaid, but of the free woman.
31. New Testament, Romans, 3.9-3.20 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.9. What then? Are we better than they? No, in no way. For we previously charged both Jews and Greeks, that they are all under sin. 3.10. As it is written, "There is no one righteous. No, not one. 3.11. There is no one who understands. There is no one who seeks after God. 3.12. They have all turned aside. They have together become unprofitable. There is no one who does good, No, not, so much as one. 3.13. Their throat is an open tomb. With their tongues they have used deceit." "The poison of vipers is under their lips; 3.14. Whose mouth is full of cursing and bitterness. 3.15. Their feet are swift to shed blood. 3.16. Destruction and misery are in their ways. 3.17. The way of peace, they haven't known. 3.18. There is no fear of God before their eyes. 3.19. Now we know that whatever things the law says, it speaks to those who are under the law, that every mouth may be closed, and all the world may be brought under the judgment of God. 3.20. Because by the works of the law, no flesh will be justified in his sight. For through the law comes the knowledge of sin.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aaron, as speech/logos prophorikos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510
abraham Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 710; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151, 152
abram/abraham, analogue to odysseus Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
abram/abraham, as type of soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 272
abram/abraham, change of name Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243, 266, 267, 272
abram/abraham, fall Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
abram/abraham, migration Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
abram/abraham, prayer for ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510, 511, 512
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 272
adam Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
alexandria Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9, 138, 139, 241, 243, 266, 267, 272, 386, 402, 414, 510, 511
allegory/allegoresis, etymology in/vs. Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 571
allegory/allegoresis, homeric parallels Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
allegory/allegoresis, of the soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
allegory/allegoresis, pedagogical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
allegory/allegoresis, platonist parallels Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
allegory/allegoresis Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 267, 272
allegory Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151, 152
allotment of god/the lord Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
archangel Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
arithmology, ten Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
attributes, divine, eternal Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 512
balaam Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 511
banishment Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184, 710
benjamin Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241
birnbaum, e. Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
body Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 511
cain Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
cattle Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 710
chariot Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 710
cherubim Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 710
commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9
cycle, patriarchal, abrahamic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9
cycle, patriarchal, adamic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 9
cycle, patriarchal, noahic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 9
education Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 571
egypt Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
egyptians Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
emotions, bad Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139
emotions, good Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139, 214
emotions Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139
entrance Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184, 710
epicureanism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
etymology, greek Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 272
etymology, hebrew Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 266, 276, 277, 512
etymology Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
exile Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
exposition of the law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402, 414
expulsion, adam, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
expulsion, eve, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
expulsion, paradise, from Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 710
faith Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
fall, epistemic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
fate, ill-fated Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
figures of speech, synonyms Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
flesh Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 267
god, face of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
grace Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
hagar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 277, 402, 511; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
homer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
hope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
inheritance of god/the lord Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139, 214, 272, 276, 386, 402, 414, 571; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510, 511, 512, 571; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
israel, nation/people Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
israel, seeing god Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
israel, seer of god Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 512
jacob, practicer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 512
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 9, 241, 511, 512
jethro Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
jews/judeans/ioudaioi, and ethnicity in philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
joseph Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 511
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 138, 139, 276, 414, 571
laughter Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139, 414
law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139, 510
leah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
lemma, main/primary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 9
levite Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
levites Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
logos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243, 511, 512
many-named, prophet Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 267
mind, eye of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 267, 276, 510, 512; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
mourning Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 710
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243, 266, 267, 272, 276, 277
names, divine (lack of) Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
names, philosophy of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 243
odysseus Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
onomasticon Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 272
oppression Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 710
paideia/greek education Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
paradise, traveling (journey or foray) to/from Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
penelope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
pentateuch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 243, 512
perfection Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 243, 276, 511
philo Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157
piety Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
plutarch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
portion of god/the lord Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
prayers, adam, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 710
prayers, moses, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
preliminary studies Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277, 511
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402, 414
qge Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402, 414
quarrelsome exegetes Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 241, 243, 266, 267
rachel Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
regions, paradise, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
restoration Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
reuben Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 511, 512
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 402, 510, 511, 571
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 241, 272, 276, 277, 386, 402, 414, 511; Gruen, Ethnicity in the Ancient World - Did it matter (2020) 157; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184, 710; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151, 152
sophists Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 510, 511, 571
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 266
tamar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
technique, rhetorical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8
time Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 414
tithe, levitical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
virginity Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151
virtue, as queen Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 276
virtue, cardinal Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402
virtue, specific/generic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 214, 267, 272, 277, 386, 402, 571; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184, 710; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 152
virtues, paradise of' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 160
wickedness Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 184
wisdom Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 8, 138, 214, 272, 277, 510, 512; Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 710; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 151, 152
womanhood Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 152
zipporah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386