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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9229
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Change Of Names, 190-192


nanBut Abraham also planted a field, using the ratio of an hundred for the measurement of the ground: and Isaac found some barley yielding a hundred Fold. And Moses also made the vestibule of the sacred tabernacle in a hundred arches, measuring out the distance towards the east and towards the west.


nanMoreover the ratio of a hundred is the first fruit of the first fruit which the Levites assign to those who are consecrated to the priesthood; for after they have taken the tenth from the nation they are enjoined to give unto the priests a sacred tenth of the whole share, as if from their own possessions.


nanAnd if a person were to consider, he might find many other instances to the praise of the aforesaid number brought forward in the law of Moses, but for the present what have been enumerated are sufficient. But if from the hundred you set aside the tenth part as a sacred first fruit to God who produces, and increases, and brings to perfection the fruit of the soul--for how can it be anything but perfect, inasmuch as it is on the confines between the first and the tenth, in the same manner in which the Holy of Holies is separated by the veil in the middle. [...] by which those things which are of the same genus are divided according to the differences in species? XXXVI.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 28.4-28.8 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

28.4. וְלִבְנֵי אַהֲרֹן תַּעֲשֶׂה כֻתֳּנֹת וְעָשִׂיתָ לָהֶם אַבְנֵטִים וּמִגְבָּעוֹת תַּעֲשֶׂה לָהֶם לְכָבוֹד וּלְתִפְאָרֶת׃ 28.4. וְאֵלֶּה הַבְּגָדִים אֲשֶׁר יַעֲשׂוּ חֹשֶׁן וְאֵפוֹד וּמְעִיל וּכְתֹנֶת תַּשְׁבֵּץ מִצְנֶפֶת וְאַבְנֵט וְעָשׂוּ בִגְדֵי־קֹדֶשׁ לְאַהֲרֹן אָחִיךָ וּלְבָנָיו לְכַהֲנוֹ־לִי׃ 28.5. וְהֵם יִקְחוּ אֶת־הַזָּהָב וְאֶת־הַתְּכֵלֶת וְאֶת־הָאַרְגָּמָן וְאֶת־תּוֹלַעַת הַשָּׁנִי וְאֶת־הַשֵּׁשׁ׃ 28.6. וְעָשׂוּ אֶת־הָאֵפֹד זָהָב תְּכֵלֶת וְאַרְגָּמָן תּוֹלַעַת שָׁנִי וְשֵׁשׁ מָשְׁזָר מַעֲשֵׂה חֹשֵׁב׃ 28.7. שְׁתֵּי כְתֵפֹת חֹבְרֹת יִהְיֶה־לּוֹ אֶל־שְׁנֵי קְצוֹתָיו וְחֻבָּר׃ 28.8. וְחֵשֶׁב אֲפֻדָּתוֹ אֲשֶׁר עָלָיו כְּמַעֲשֵׂהוּ מִמֶּנּוּ יִהְיֶה זָהָב תְּכֵלֶת וְאַרְגָּמָן וְתוֹלַעַת שָׁנִי וְשֵׁשׁ מָשְׁזָר׃ 28.4. And these are the garments which they shall make: a breastplate, and an ephod, and a robe, and a tunic of chequer work, a mitre, and a girdle; and they shall make holy garments for Aaron thy brother, and his sons, that he may minister unto Me in the priest’s office." 28.5. And they shall take the gold, and the blue, and the purple, and the scarlet, and the fine linen." 28.6. And they shall make the ephod of gold, of blue, and purple, scarlet, and fine twined linen, the work of the skilful workman." 28.7. It shall have two shoulder-pieces joined to the two ends thereof, that it may be joined together." 28.8. And the skilfully woven band, which is upon it, wherewith to gird it on, shall be like the work thereof and of the same piece: of gold, of blue, and purple, and scarlet, and fine twined linen."
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "17.17" "17.17" "17 17"\n1 15.4 15.4 15 4 \n2 15.5 15.5 15 5 \n3 15.6 15.6 15 6 \n4 18.12 18.12 18 12 \n5 18.13 18.13 18 13 \n6 18.14 18.14 18 14 \n7 18.15 18.15 18 15 \n8 21.33 21.33 21 33 \n9 26.32 26.32 26 32 \n10 26.33 26.33 26 33 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 16.4-16.5 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

16.4. כְּתֹנֶת־בַּד קֹדֶשׁ יִלְבָּשׁ וּמִכְנְסֵי־בַד יִהְיוּ עַל־בְּשָׂרוֹ וּבְאַבְנֵט בַּד יַחְגֹּר וּבְמִצְנֶפֶת בַּד יִצְנֹף בִּגְדֵי־קֹדֶשׁ הֵם וְרָחַץ בַּמַּיִם אֶת־בְּשָׂרוֹ וּלְבֵשָׁם׃ 16.5. וּמֵאֵת עֲדַת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל יִקַּח שְׁנֵי־שְׂעִירֵי עִזִּים לְחַטָּאת וְאַיִל אֶחָד לְעֹלָה׃ 16.4. He shall put on the holy linen tunic, and he shall have the linen breeches upon his flesh, and shall be girded with the linen girdle, and with the linen mitre shall he be attired; they are the holy garments; and he shall bathe his flesh in water, and put them on." 16.5. And he shall take of the congregation of the children of Israel two he-goats for a sin-offering, and one ram for a burnt-offering."
4. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 18.25-18.32 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

18.25. וַיְדַבֵּר יְהוָה אֶל־מֹשֶׁה לֵּאמֹר׃ 18.26. וְאֶל־הַלְוִיִּם תְּדַבֵּר וְאָמַרְתָּ אֲלֵהֶם כִּי־תִקְחוּ מֵאֵת בְּנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵל אֶת־הַמַּעֲשֵׂר אֲשֶׁר נָתַתִּי לָכֶם מֵאִתָּם בְּנַחֲלַתְכֶם וַהֲרֵמֹתֶם מִמֶּנּוּ תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מַעֲשֵׂר מִן־הַמַּעֲשֵׂר׃ 18.27. וְנֶחְשַׁב לָכֶם תְּרוּמַתְכֶם כַּדָּגָן מִן־הַגֹּרֶן וְכַמְלֵאָה מִן־הַיָּקֶב׃ 18.28. כֵּן תָּרִימוּ גַם־אַתֶּם תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מִכֹּל מַעְשְׂרֹתֵיכֶם אֲשֶׁר תִּקְחוּ מֵאֵת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וּנְתַתֶּם מִמֶּנּוּ אֶת־תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה לְאַהֲרֹן הַכֹּהֵן׃ 18.29. מִכֹּל מַתְּנֹתֵיכֶם תָּרִימוּ אֵת כָּל־תְּרוּמַת יְהוָה מִכָּל־חֶלְבּוֹ אֶת־מִקְדְּשׁוֹ מִמֶּנּוּ׃ 18.31. וַאֲכַלְתֶּם אֹתוֹ בְּכָל־מָקוֹם אַתֶּם וּבֵיתְכֶם כִּי־שָׂכָר הוּא לָכֶם חֵלֶף עֲבֹדַתְכֶם בְּאֹהֶל מוֹעֵד׃ 18.32. וְלֹא־תִשְׂאוּ עָלָיו חֵטְא בַּהֲרִימְכֶם אֶת־חֶלְבּוֹ מִמֶּנּוּ וְאֶת־קָדְשֵׁי בְנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵל לֹא תְחַלְּלוּ וְלֹא תָמוּתוּ׃ 18.25. And the LORD spoke unto Moses, saying:" 18.26. ’Moreover thou shalt speak unto the Levites, and say unto them: When ye take of the children of Israel the tithe which I have given you from them for your inheritance, then ye shall set apart of it a gift for the LORD, even a tithe of the tithe." 18.27. And the gift which ye set apart shall be reckoned unto you, as though it were the corn of the threshing-floor, and as the fulness of the wine-press." 18.28. Thus ye also shall set apart a gift unto the LORD of all your tithes, which ye receive of the children of Israel; and thereof ye shall give the gift which is set apart unto the LORD to Aaron the priest." 18.29. Out of all that is given you ye shall set apart all of that which is due unto the LORD, of all the best thereof, even the hallowed part thereof out of it." 18.30. Therefore thou shalt say unto them: When ye set apart the best thereof from it, then it shall be counted unto the Levites as the increase of the threshing-floor, and as the increase of the wine-press." 18.31. And ye may eat it in every place, ye and your households; for it is your reward in return for your service in the tent of meeting." 18.32. And ye shall bear no sin by reason of it, seeing that ye have set apart from it the best thereof; and ye shall not profane the holy things of the children of Israel, that ye die not.’"
5. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

716a. completeth his circuit by nature’s ordice in straight, unswerving course. With him followeth Justice, as avenger of them that fall short of the divine law; and she, again, is followed by every man who would fain be happy, cleaving to her with lowly and orderly behavior; but whoso is uplifted by vainglory, or prideth himself on his riches or his honors or his comeliness of body, and through this pride joined to youth and folly, is inflamed in soul with insolence, dreaming that he has no need of ruler or guide, but rather is competent himself to guide others,—
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 263-274, 262 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 12-13, 3-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Why then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV. 10. He also considered this point, in the second place, that it is indispensable that the soul of the man who is about to receive sacred laws should be thoroughly cleansed and purified from all stains, however difficult to be washed out, which the promiscuous multitude of mixed men from all quarters has impregnated cities with;
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 81-87, 80 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

80. Let us now, therefore, proceeding in regular order, speak of the enemies of these persons, men who honour instruction and right reason, among whom are those who are attached to the virtue of one of their parents, being half-perfect companions; these men are the most excellent guardians of the laws which the father, that is to say, right reason, established, and faithful stewards of the customs which education, their mother, instituted;
9. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 63-64, 62 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

62. Accordingly, Abraham, as long as he was abiding in the land of the Chaldaeans, that is to say, in opinion, before he received his new name, and while he was still called Abram, was a man born of heaven, investigating the sublime nature of things on high, and all that took place in these regions, and the causes of them, and studying everything of that kind in the true spirit of philosophy; on which account he received an appellation corresponding to the pursuits to which he devoted himself: for the name Abram, being interpreted, signifies the sublime father, and is a name very fitting for the paternal mind, which in every direction contemplates sublime and heavenly things: for the mind is the father of our composite being, reaching as high as the sky and even farther.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 180, 184-185, 189, 191-192, 2, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. Abraham was ninety and nine years old; and the Lord appeared unto Abraham, and said unto him, I am thy God." The number of nine, when added to the number ninety, is very near to a hundred; in which number the self-taught race shone forth, namely Isaac, the most excellent joy of all enjoyments; for he was born when his father was a hundred years old.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 28-30, 27 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

27. Let these men, then, hang by their appetites as by a halter; but the wise Abraham, where he stands, comes near to God, who is also standing. For Moses says that "Abraham was standing near to God; and coming nigh unto him, he Said,"... For in good truth the unalterable soul is the only thing that has access to the unalterable God; and being of such a disposition, it does really stand very near to the Divine power.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On Sobriety, 66, 65 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.205, 1.213-1.217 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.213. These three signs, the white, the variegated, and the ring-straked and speckled, are as yet imperfect in the practiser of virtue, who has not himself as yet attained to perfection. But, in the case of him who is perfect, they also appear to be perfect. And in what manner they appear so we will examine. 1.214. The sacred scripture has appointed that the great High Priest, when he was about to perform the ministrations appointed by the law, should be besprinkled with water and ashes in the first place, that he might come to a remembrance of himself. For the wise Abraham also, when he went forth to converse with God, pronounced himself to be dust and ashes. In the second place, it enjoins him to put on a tunic reaching down to his feet, and the variouslyembroidered thing which was called his breastplate, an image and representation of the lightgiving stars which appear in heaven. 1.215. For there are, as it seems, two temples belonging to God; one being this world, in which the high priest is the divine word, his own firstborn son. The other is the rational soul, the priest of which is the real true man, the copy of whom, perceptible to the senses, is he who performs his paternal vows and sacrifices, to whom it is enjoined to put on the aforesaid tunic, the representation of the universal heaven, in order that the world may join with the man in offering sacrifice, and that the man may likewise co-operate with the universe. 1.216. He is now therefore shown to have these two things, the speckled and the variegated character. We will now proceed to explain the third and most perfect kind, which is denominated thoroughly white. When this same high priest enters into the innermost parts of the holy temple, he is clothed in the variegated garment, and he also assumes another linen robe, made of the very finest flax. 1.217. And this is an emblem of vigour, and incorruptibility, and the most brilliant light. For such a veil is a thing very difficult to be broken, and it is made of nothing mortal, and when it is properly and carefully purified it has a most clear and brilliant appearance.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.84-1.85 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.84. But the high priest is commanded to wear a similar dress when he goes into the holy of holies to offer incense, because linen is not made of any animal that dies, as woollen garments are. He is also commanded to wear another robe also, having very beautiful embroidery and ornament upon it, so that it may seem to be a copy and representation of the world. And the description of the ornament is a clear proof of this; 1.85. for in the first place the whole of the round robe is of hyacinthine colour, a tunic reaching to the feet, being an emblem of the air, since the air also is by nature black, and in a manner may be said to be reaching to the feet, as it is extended from above from the regions about the moon, to the lowest places of the earth.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 213-219, 212 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

212. The most ancient person of the Jewish nation was a Chaldaean by birth, born of a father who was very skilful in astronomy, and famous among those men who pass their lives in the study of mathematics, who look upon the stars as gods, and worship the whole heaven and the whole world; thinking, that from them do all good and all evil proceed, to every individual among men; as they do not conceive that there is any cause whatever, except such as are included among the objects of the outward senses.
16. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 2.89-2.90 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.89. Therefore the tabernacle was built in the manner that has been here described, like a holy temple. And all around it a sacred precinct extended a hundred cubits in length and fifty cubits in width, having pillars all placed at an equal distance of five cubits from one another, so that there were in all sixty pillars; and they were divided so that forty were placed along the length and twenty along the breadth of the tabernacle, one half on each side. 2.90. And the material of which the pillars were composed was cedar within, and on the surface without silver; and the pedestals of all of them were made of brass, and the height was equal to five cubits. For it seemed to the architect to be proper to make the height of what was called the hall equal to one half of the entire length, that so the tabernacle might appear to be elevated to double its real height. And there were thin curtains fitted to the pillars along their entire length and breadth, resembling so many sails, in order that no one might be able to enter in who was not pure.
17. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.43, 3.83-3.87, 3.105-3.107, 3.217-3.219 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 3.56 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 91-94, 90 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

90. Therefore it is a necessary addition which is subjoined, "Abraham believed in God," to the praise of him who did thus believe. And yet, perhaps, some one may say, "Do you judge this worthy of praise? who would not give his attention to God when saying or promising anything, even if he were the most wicked and impious of all men?
20. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 120, 123-126, 130-137, 119 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

119. But to the impious Cain, neither does the earth contribute anything to give him vigour, even though he never concerns himself about anything which is exterior to it; on which account, in the next sentence, he is found "groaning and trembling upon the Earth," that is to say, under the influence of grief and terror; and such also is the miserable life of a wicked man, who has received for his inheritance the most painful of the four passions, pain and terror; the one being equivalent to groaning, and the other to trembling; for it is inevitable, that some evil should either be present to or impending over such a man. Now the expectation of impending evil causes fear, but the suffering of present evil causes pain.
21. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 168-169, 76, 167 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

167. And besides all this, we must likewise add, that we are not speaking of a stern-looking and sordid kind of wisdom, contracted by profound thought and ill-humour; but, on the other hand, of that wisdom which wears on tranquil and cheerful appearance, being full of joy and happiness, by which men have often been led on to sport and divert themselves in no inelegant manner, indulging in amusements suitable to their dignified and earnest character, just as in a well-tuned lyre one may have a combination uniting, by means of opposite sounds, in one melodious harmony.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aaron Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 477
abraham, as planter Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
abram/abraham, covenant with Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206
abram/abraham, faith and doubt of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 206, 477, 478, 479
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139, 477
allegorists Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
aristotle Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
arithmology, ninety Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 477
arithmology, one-hundred Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 477, 478
arithmology, ten Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
attributes, divine, eternal Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 479
beersheba Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
body Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206
christ Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
doubt Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463, 477, 478, 479
emotions, bad Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139
emotions, good Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 139
emotions Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 139
etymology Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
exposition of the law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206
faith Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
god, beginning and end/limit Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
grace Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206
holy of holies Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206, 477
hope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 463
imagery, running Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 139, 477, 478, 479; Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206
josephus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 139, 477
laughter Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 139, 463, 477
law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 139, 479
levite Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 139, 478
metaphorical language, use of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206, 463, 478, 479
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206
new testament Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
offering, first fruit (tithe) Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 478
onomasticon Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
perfection Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 477, 478, 479
philosophy, divisions Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 477
piety' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 196
priest Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 206, 477, 478
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206, 463, 477, 478
shem Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 477, 479
soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
tabernacle/temple Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 206, 478, 479
time Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 478
tithe, levitical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 139, 478
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463