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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9229
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Change Of Names, 179


nanon which account the most illustrious of all of the Greek poets appears to me to have said:-- "Swift as a winged bird or fleeter Thought." Showing by these words the exceeding speed of its promptitude, placing the thought after the winged bird as a sort of climax; for the mind advances at the same moment to very many things and bodies, hurrying on with indescribable impetuosity, and without a moment's lapse of time it speeds at once to the borders of both earth and sea, bringing together and dividing infinite magnitudes by a single word; and at the same time it soars to such a height above the earth, that it penetrates through the air and reaches even the aether, and scarcely stops at the very furthest circle of the fixed stars.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Septuagint, Tobit, 2.4 (10th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2.4. So before I tasted anything I sprang up and removed the body to a place of shelter until sunset.
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 4.11, 4.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.11. וְעַתָּה אָרוּר אָתָּה מִן־הָאֲדָמָה אֲשֶׁר פָּצְתָה אֶת־פִּיהָ לָקַחַת אֶת־דְּמֵי אָחִיךָ מִיָּדֶךָ׃ 4.14. הֵן גֵּרַשְׁתָּ אֹתִי הַיּוֹם מֵעַל פְּנֵי הָאֲדָמָה וּמִפָּנֶיךָ אֶסָּתֵר וְהָיִיתִי נָע וָנָד בָּאָרֶץ וְהָיָה כָל־מֹצְאִי יַהַרְגֵנִי׃ 4.11. And now cursed art thou from the ground, which hath opened her mouth to receive thy brother’s blood from thy hand." 4.14. Behold, Thou hast driven me out this day from the face of the land; and from Thy face shall I be hid; and I shall be a fugitive and a wanderer in the earth; and it will come to pass, that whosoever findeth me will slay me.’"
3. Hebrew Bible, Proverbs, 18.4 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

18.4. מַיִם עֲמֻקִּים דִּבְרֵי פִי־אִישׁ נַחַל נֹבֵעַ מְקוֹר חָכְמָה׃ 18.4. The words of a man’s mouth are as deep waters; A flowing brook, a fountain of wisdom."
4. Hebrew Bible, 1 Samuel, 20.34, 25.9 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20.34. וַיָּקָם יְהוֹנָתָן מֵעִם הַשֻּׁלְחָן בָּחֳרִי־אָף וְלֹא־אָכַל בְּיוֹם־הַחֹדֶשׁ הַשֵּׁנִי לֶחֶם כִּי נֶעְצַב אֶל־דָּוִד כִּי הִכְלִמוֹ אָבִיו׃ 25.9. וַיָּבֹאוּ נַעֲרֵי דָוִד וַיְדַבְּרוּ אֶל־נָבָל כְּכָל־הַדְּבָרִים הָאֵלֶּה בְּשֵׁם דָּוִד וַיָּנוּחוּ׃ 20.34. So Yehonatan arose from the table in fierce anger, and ate no food on the second day of the new moon: for he was grieved for David, because his father had put him to shame." 25.9. And when David’s young men came, they spoke to Naval according to all those words in the name of David, and waited."
5. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 24.6 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

24.6. לָכֵן כֹּה־אָמַר אֲדֹנָי יְהֹוִה אוֹי עִיר הַדָּמִים סִיר אֲשֶׁר חֶלְאָתָה בָהּ וְחֶלְאָתָהּ לֹא יָצְאָה מִמֶּנָּה לִנְתָחֶיהָ לִנְתָחֶיהָ הוֹצִיאָהּ לֹא־נָפַל עָלֶיהָ גּוֹרָל׃ 24.6. Wherefore thus saith the Lord GOD: Woe to the bloody city, to the pot whose filth is therein, and whose filth is not gone out of it! bring it out piece by piece; no lot is fallen upon it."
6. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

109e. that by reason of feebleness and sluggishness, we are unable to attain to the upper surface of the air; for if anyone should come to the top of the air or should get wings and fly up, he could lift his head above it and see, as fishes lift their heads out of the water and see the things in our world, so he would see things in that upper world; and, if his nature were strong enough to bear the sight, he would recognize that that is the real heaven
7. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8. Septuagint, Tobit, 2.4 (4th cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2.4. So before I tasted anything I sprang up and removed the body to a place of shelter until sunset.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 184 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

184. These things then having been now said for the purpose of overturning the opinion of the Chaldeans; he thinks that it is desirable to lead off and invite away those who are still Chaldaizing in their minds to the truth of his teaching, and he begins thus:--"Why," says he, "my excellent friends do you raise yourselves up in such a sudden manner from the earth, and soar to such a height? and why do ye rise above the air, and tread the ethereal expanse, investigating accurately the motions of the sun, and the periodical revolutions of the moon, and the harmonious and much-renowned paths of the rest of the stars? for these things are too great for your comprehension, inasmuch as they have received a more blessed and divine position.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 67, 66 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

66. for the name Abram, being interpreted, means "sublime father," but Abraham means the "elect father of sound;" and how these names differ from one another we shall know more clearly if we first of all read what is exhibited under each of them.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 71, 70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

70. And again, being raised up on wings, and so surveying and contemplating the air, and all the commotions to which it is subject, it is borne upwards to the higher firmament, and to the revolutions of the heavenly bodies. And also being itself involved in the revolutions of the planets and fixed stars according to the perfect laws of music, and being led on by love, which is the guide of wisdom, it proceeds onwards till, having surmounted all essence intelligible by the external senses, it comes to aspire to such as is perceptible only by the intellect:
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.37, 1.207 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.37. And the witnesses of this fact are those who have not merely tasted philosophy with their outermost lips, but who have abundantly feasted on its reasonings and its doctrines; for the reasoning of these men, being raised on high far above the earth, roams in the air, and soaring aloft with the sun, and moon, and all the firmament of heaven, being eager to behold all the things that exist therein, finds its power of vision somewhat indistinct from a vast quantity of unalloyed light being poured over it, so that the eye of his soul becomes dazzled and confused by the splendour. 1.207. And by the command that the feet of the victim should be washed, it is figuratively shown that we must no longer walk upon the earth, but soar aloft and traverse the air. For the soul of the man who is devoted to God, being eager for truth, springs upward and mounts from earth to heaven; and, being borne on wings, traverses the expanse of the air, being eager to be classed with and to move in concert with the sun, and moon, and all the rest of the most sacred and most harmonious company of the stars, under the immediate command and government of God, who has a kingly authority without any rival, and of which he can never be deprived, in accordance with which he justly governs the universe.
13. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.38 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.38. Since how could the soul have perceived God if he had not inspired it, and touched it according to his power? For human intellect would not have dared to mount up to such a height as to lay claim to the nature of God, if God himself had not drawn it up to himself, as far as it was possible for the mind of man to be drawn up, and if he had not formed it according to those powers which can be comprehended.
14. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 87, 89, 86 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

86. Let us then no longer doubt, we who are the disciples of Moses, how man conceived an idea of God who is destitute of all figure, for he was taught the reason of this by the divine oracle, and afterwards he explained it to us. And he spoke as follows:--"He said that the Creator made no soul in any body capable of seeing its Creator by its own intrinsic powers. But having considered that the knowledge of the Creator and the proper understanding of the work of Creation, would be of great advantage to the creature (for such knowledge is the boundary of happiness and blessedness), he breathed into him from above something of his own divine nature. And his divine nature stamped her own impression in an invisible manner on the invisible soul, in order that even the earth might not be destitute of the image of God.
15. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 24-25, 23 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

23. On this account, those persons who are insatiable in their desire for wisdom and knowledge are said in the sacred oracles to be "called Up.
16. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 7.360, 8.25, 19.185 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.25. When Solomon heard this from God, he presently leaped out of his bed; and when he had worshipped him, he returned to Jerusalem; and after he had offered great sacrifices before the tabernacle, he feasted all his own family. 8.25. Now he had eighteen legitimate wives, and thirty concubines; and he had born to him twenty-eight sons and threescore daughters; but he appointed Abijah, whom he had by Maachah, to be his successor in the kingdom, and intrusted him already with the treasures and the strongest cities. 19.185. 3. And this was the purport of Sentius’s oration, which was received with pleasure by the senators, and by as many of the equestrian order as were present. And now one Trebellius Maximus rose up hastily, and took off Sentius’s finger a ring, which had a stone, with the image of Caius engraven upon it, and which, in his zeal in speaking, and his earnestness in doing what he was about, as it was supposed, he had forgotten to take off himself. This sculpture was broken immediately.
17. New Testament, Mark, 10.50 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10.50. He, casting away his cloak, sprang up, and came to Jesus.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abel, lack of hiding in earth Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
abel Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
abram/abraham, faith and doubt of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
alienation Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
anger, wild Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
anger Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
ascend, ascension, ascent Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
ascent Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
beast Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
birds Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
body, abel, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
body, bodily Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
cain, desire of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
cave Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
david Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
death, abel, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
doubt Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
exegesis Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
faith Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
fish Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
flight Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
fountain Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
god, face of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
hands, cain, of Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
hope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
initiation Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
jesus Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
laughter Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
mysteries, mystery, lesemysterium Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
mystic, mystical, mysticism Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
philosopher, philosophical, philosophy Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
plato, platonic, platonism Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
ritual Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463
saul Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
secret Werline et al., Experientia, Volume 1: Inquiry Into Religious Experience in Early Judaism and Christianity (2008) 89
throne Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
tomb Levison, The Greek Life of Adam and Eve (2023) 981
virtue' Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 463