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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9229
Philo Of Alexandria, On The Change Of Names, 131-136


nanNow he who is properly said to give any thing whatever must by all means be giving what is his own private property. And if this is true beyond controversy, then it would follow that Isaac must not have been a man, but a being synonymous with that most exquisite joy of all pleasures, namely, laughter, the adopted son of God, who gave him as a soother and cheerer to the most peace-loving souls;


nanfor it is absurd to suppose that there was one who was a man, and another of whom bastard and illegitimate offspring were descended: and, indeed, Moses calls the man of an intellect devoted to virtue a god, when he says, "The Lord, seeing that Leah was hated, opened her Womb.


nanFor having felt compassion and pity for virtue as being hated by the race of mankind, and for the soul which loves virtue, he makes the nature which loves beauty barren, but opens the fountain of fecundity and gives it a prosperous labour.


nanBut Tamar, when she became pregnant of divine seeds, and did not know who it was who had sown them (for it is said that at that time "she had covered her face," as Moses did when he turned away, having a reverential fear of beholding God), still when she saw the tokens and the evidences and decided within herself that it was not a mortal man who gave these things, cried out, "To whomsoever these things belong, it is by him that I am with Child.


nanWhose was the ring, or the pledge, or the seal of the whole, or the archetypal appearance, according to which all the things, though devoid of species and of distinctive quality, were all stamped and marked? And whose again was the armlet, or the ornament; that is to say, destiny, the link and analogy of all things which have an indissoluble connection? Whose, again, was the staff, the thing of strong support, which wavers not, which is not moved; that is to say, admonition, correction, instruction? Whose is the sceptre, the kingly power?


nandoes it not belong to God alone? Therefore, the disposition inclined to confession, that is to say, Judah, being pleased at her possessed and inspired condition, speaks freely, saying, "She has spoken justly, because I gave her in marriage to no mortal Man;" thinking it an impious thing to pollute divine with profane things. XXIV.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "11.30" "11.30" "11 30"\n1 "29.31" "29.31" "29 31"\n2 17.15 17.15 17 15 \n3 17.16 17.16 17 16 \n4 17.17 17.17 17 17 \n5 17.18 17.18 17 18 \n6 17.19 17.19 17 19 \n7 17.20 17.20 17 20 \n8 17.21 17.21 17 21 \n9 17.22 17.22 17 22 \n10 17.23 17.23 17 23 \n11 17.24 17.24 17 24 \n12 17.25 17.25 17 25 \n13 17.26 17.26 17 26 \n14 17.27 17.27 17 27 \n15 17.28 17.28 17 28 \n16 17.29 17.29 17 29 \n17 18.10 18.10 18 10 \n18 18.11 18.11 18 11 \n19 18.12 18.12 18 12 \n20 18.13 18.13 18 13 \n21 18.14 18.14 18 14 \n22 18.15 18.15 18 15 \n23 21.3 21.3 21 3 \n24 21.6 21.6 21 6 \n25 38.15 38.15 38 15 \n26 38.16 38.16 38 16 \n27 38.17 38.17 38 17 \n28 38.18 38.18 38 18 \n29 38.19 38.19 38 19 \n30 38.20 38.20 38 20 \n31 38.21 38.21 38 21 \n32 38.22 38.22 38 22 \n33 38.23 38.23 38 23 \n34 38.24 38.24 38 24 \n35 38.25 38.25 38 25 \n36 38.26 38.26 38 26 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 28 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 3-4, 40-41, 45-47, 5-8, 86, 9-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Why then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV. 10. He also considered this point, in the second place, that it is indispensable that the soul of the man who is about to receive sacred laws should be thoroughly cleansed and purified from all stains, however difficult to be washed out, which the promiscuous multitude of mixed men from all quarters has impregnated cities with;
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 125, 124 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

124. But there are times when virtue, as if making experiment of those who come to her as pupils, to see how much eagerness they have, does not come forward to meet them, but veiling her face like Tamar, sits down in the public road, giving room to those who are traveling along the road to look upon her as a harlot, in order that those who are over curious on the subject may take off her veil and disclose her features, and may behold the untouched, and unpolluted, and most exquisite, and truly virgin beauty of modesty and chastity.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 150-156, 149 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

149. Nor does he, who is sent forth to search for that virtue which is invincible and embittered against the ridiculous pursuits of men, by name Tamar, find her. And this failure of his is strictly in accordance with nature; for we read in the scripture, "And Judah sent a kid in the hands of his shepherd, the Adullamite, to receive back his pledge from the woman, and he found her not: and he asked the men of the place, Where is the harlot who was in Ae by the wayside? and they said, There is no harlot in this place. And he returned back to Judah, and said unto him, I have not found her, and the men of the place say that there is no harlot there. And Judah said, Let her keep the things, only let me not be made a laughing-stock, I because I have sent the kid, and you because you have not found Her." Oh, the admirable trial! oh, the temptation becoming sacred things!
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 130, 132-136, 139-140, 143-144, 147, 152, 157, 200, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. Abraham was ninety and nine years old; and the Lord appeared unto Abraham, and said unto him, I am thy God." The number of nine, when added to the number ninety, is very near to a hundred; in which number the self-taught race shone forth, namely Isaac, the most excellent joy of all enjoyments; for he was born when his father was a hundred years old.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

31. And this, too, I do through the pity which exists in rational nature, in order that it may be raised from the hell of the passions to the heavenly region of virtue; I being the guide, who also have made the road which leads to heaven, so that it may be a plain road for suppliant souls, and have shown it to them all, in order that they may not foolishly wander out of the way. X.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 171 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 2.52, 2.54 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.52. In considering the melancholy and fearful condition of the human race, and how full it is of innumerable evils, which the covetousness of the soul begets, which the defects of the body produce, and which all the inequalities of the soul inflict upon us, and which the retaliations of those among whom we live, both doing and suffering innumerable evils, are continually causing us, he then wondered whether any one being tossed about in such a sea of troubles, some brought on deliberately and others unintentionally, and never being able to rest in peace nor to cast anchor in the safe haven of a life free from danger, could by any possibility really keep a feast, not one in name, but one which should really be so, enjoying himself and being happy in the contemplation of the world and all the things in it, and in obedience to nature, and in a perfect harmony between his words and his actions, between his actions and his words. 2.54. In reference to which fact, a certain pre-eminently virtuous mind among the people of old, {8}{#ge 18:10.} when all its passions were tranquil, smiled, being full of and completely penetrated with joy, and reasoning with itself whether perhaps to rejoice was not a peculiar attribute of God, and whether it might not itself miss this joy by pursuing what are thought delights by men, was timorous, and denied the laughter of her soul until she was comforted.
10. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.86-3.87, 3.217-3.219 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 4.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 124, 123 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

123. But by this is meant wickedness, which is established in the souls of foolish men; the remedy for which (as one seeks for remedies for a severe disease) is found to be the just man, who is in possession of the panacea, justice. When, therefore, he has repelled these evils he is filled with joy, as also is Sarah; for she says, "The Lord hath caused me laughter;" and she adds further, "so that whosoever hears it shall rejoice with Me.
13. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 1.223 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.223. Abraham also placed his own happiness in this prospect, that, when he should die, he should leave this his son in a safe and secure condition; which accordingly he obtained by the will of God: who being desirous to make an experiment of Abraham’s religious disposition towards himself, appeared to him, and enumerated all the blessings he had bestowed on him;
14. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 3.7-3.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 385, 386
allegory Kessler, Bound by the Bible: Jews, Christians and the Sacrifice of Isaac (2004) 101
artemis Kessler, Bound by the Bible: Jews, Christians and the Sacrifice of Isaac (2004) 101
chaldean (hebrew language) Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
child sacrifice Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
childishness Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
collocutions Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
equable states (εὐπάθειαι) Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
etymologies, of isaac Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
fear Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
god; gods Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 238
grace Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 390
hannah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 390
heaven Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 238
hebrew, and chaldean Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
humanity, grief and fear of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
iphigenia Kessler, Bound by the Bible: Jews, Christians and the Sacrifice of Isaac (2004) 101
isaac, enthusiasm Kessler, Bound by the Bible: Jews, Christians and the Sacrifice of Isaac (2004) 101
isaac, joy symbolized by Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
isaac, name of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
isaac, praised Kessler, Bound by the Bible: Jews, Christians and the Sacrifice of Isaac (2004) 101
isaac, son of god Kessler, Bound by the Bible: Jews, Christians and the Sacrifice of Isaac (2004) 101
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386, 390
joseph Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 385, 387
joy, god bestowing Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
joy, isaac symbolizing Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
joy, of god Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
joy, sacrifice of isaac and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
joy Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328; Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 390
laughter, of sarah Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
laughter Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328; Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 390
leah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386, 390
literal meaning Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 238
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 387, 390
narrative Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 238
passions, fear among Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
passions, stoicism and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
passions Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
pharaoh Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 387
philo Kessler, Bound by the Bible: Jews, Christians and the Sacrifice of Isaac (2004) 101
philo of alexandria Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 238
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 387
rachel Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386, 390
revelation Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 238
sacrifice of isaac, allegorical interpretation of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
sacrifice of isaac Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
sarah, laughter of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 385, 386, 390
symbol Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 238
tamar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386, 387
truth Brenk and Lanzillotta, Plutarch on Literature, Graeco-Roman Religion, Jews and Christians (2023) 238
virtue' Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 385
zipporah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386, 390
εὐπάθεια Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
χαρά Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328
ῥητός Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 328