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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9218
Philo Of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 96


nanAnd these things thus expressed resemble visions and prodigies; I mean the account of one dragon uttering the voice of a man and pouring his sophistries into most innocent dispositions, and deceiving the woman with plausible arguments of persuasion; and of another becoming a cause of complete safety to those who looked upon it.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, None (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10.8. וְכוּשׁ יָלַד אֶת־נִמְרֹד הוּא הֵחֵל לִהְיוֹת גִּבֹּר בָּאָרֶץ׃ 10.8. And Cush begot Nimrod; he began to be a mighty one in the earth."
2. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 97, 95 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

95. But we must explain what is the enigmatical meaning which he conceals under this prayer, the name of Dan, being interpreted, means "judgment;" therefore he here likens that power of the soul which investigates, and accurately examines, and distinguishes between, and, in some degree, decides on each part of the soul, to a dragon (and the dragon is an animal various in its movements, and exceedingly cunning, and ready to display its courage, and very powerful to repel those who begin acts of violence), but not to that friendly serpent, the counsellor of life, which is wont to be called Eve in his national language, but to the one made by Moses, of the material of brass, which, when those who had been bitten by the poisonous serpents, and who were at the point of death beheld, they are said to have lived and not to have died. XXII.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 53, 57, 61, 63-65, 40 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

40. And Adam knew his wife, and she conceived and brought forth Cain; and she said I have gotten a man by means of the Lord; and he caused her also to bring forth Abel his Brother." These men, to whose virtue the Jewish legislation bears testimony, he does not represent as knowing their wives, such as Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Moses, and if there are any others of like zeal with them; 40. A third view of the question is, that no king or tyrant may ever despise an obscure private individual, from being full of insolence and haughty pride; but that such an one, coming as a pupil to the school of the sacred laws, may relax his eyebrows, unlearning his self-opinionativeness, and yielding rather to true reason.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. But he who brings his account nearer the truth, has distinguished between the rational and irrational animals, so that he testifies that identity of language belong to men alone: and this also, as they say, is a fabulous story. And indeed they affirm, that the separation of language into an infinite variety of dialects, which Moses calls the confusion of tongues, was effected as a remedy for sins, in order that men might not be able to cooperate in common for deeds of wickedness through understanding one another; and that they might not, when they were in a manner deprived of all means of communication with one another, be able with united energies to apply themselves to the same actions.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 171 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

171. Who, then, is so impious as to conceive that God is one who afflicts, and who brings that most pitiable death of hunger upon those who are not able to live without food? For God is good, and the cause of good things, bounteous, the saviour, the supporter, the giver of wealth, the giver of great gifts, driving out wickedness from the sacred boundaries; for thus did he drive out the burdens of the earth, Adam and Cain, from paradise.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 60, 65, 67, 7, 17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. And the expression used by the writer of the psalm, in the following verse, testifies to the truth of my assertion, for he says, "He sent upon them the fury of His wrath, anger, and rage, and affliction, and he sent evil angels among Them." These are the wicked who, assuming the name of angels, not being acquainted with the daughters of right reason, that is with the sciences and the virtues, but which pursue the mortal descendants of mortal men, that is the pleasures, which can confer no genuine beauty, which is perceived by the intellect alone, but only a bastard sort of elegance of form, by means of which the outward sense is beguiled;
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 143 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

143. and to those who ask, whether she who is barren has an offspring (for the holy scriptures, which some time ago represented Sarrah as barren, now confess that she will become a mother); this answer must be given, that a woman who is barren cannot, in the course of nature, bring forth an offspring, just as a blind man cannot see, nor a deaf man hear; but that the soul, which is barren of bad things, and which is unproductive of immoderate license of the passions and vices, is alone very nearly attaining to a happy delivery, bringing forth objects worthy of love, namely, the number seven, according to the hymn which is sung by Grace, that is, by Hannah, who says, "she who was barren hath born seven, and she who had many children has become weak:
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 151-177, 2, 76, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. of other lawgivers, some have set forth what they considered to be just and reasonable, in a naked and unadorned manner, while others, investing their ideas with an abundance of amplification, have sought to bewilder the people, by burying the truth under a heap of fabulous inventions.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 33 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

33. After he had said this he proceeds to say, "And Cain knew his wife, and she conceived and bare Enoch; and he built a city, and called the name of the city after the name of his son Enoch." Is it not here reasonable to raise the question, why Cain knew his wife? for there had been no birth of any one other woman since that of Eve who was formed out of the side of the man, until the woman who is here mentioned;
10. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 2, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. And Cain went out from before the face of God, and dwelt in the land of Nod, opposite to Eden." Now we may raise the question whether we are to take the expressions which occur in the books that have been handed down to us by Moses and to interpret them in a somewhat metaphorical sense, while the ideas which readily present themselves as derived from the names are very deficient in truth.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. And he also added, that she should bring forth his Brother." The addition of one thing is a taking away of some other; as for instance, of particles in arithmetic, and of reasons in the soul. If then we must say that Abel is added, we must also think that Cain is taken away. But that the unusual character of expression may not cause perplexity to many we will endeavour to explain accurately the philosophy which is apparent beneath them, as clearly as may be in our power.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 3.178 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3.178. And this is the cause which is often mentioned by many people. But I have heard another also, alleged by persons of high character, who look upon the greater part of the injunctions contained in the law as plain symbols of obscure meanings, and expressed intimations of what may not be expressed. And this other reason alleged is as follows. There are two kinds of soul, much as there are two sexes among human relations; the one a masculine soul, belonging to men; the other a female soul, as found in women. The masculine soul is that which devotes itself to God alone, as the Father and Creator of the universe and the cause of all things that exist; but the female soul is that which depends upon all the things which are created, and as such are liable to destruction, and which puts forth, as it were, the hand of its power in order that in a blind sort of way it may lay hold of whatever comes across it, clinging to a generation which admits of an innumerable quantity of changes and variations, when it ought rather to cleave to the unchangeable, blessed, and thrice happy divine nature.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 199 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

199. Again, who is there who would deny that those men who were born of him who was made out of the earth were noble themselves, and the founders of noble families? persons who have received a birth more excellent than that of any succeeding generation, in being sprung from the first wedded pair, from the first man and woman, who then for the first time came together for the propagation of offspring resembling themselves. But, nevertheless, when there were two persons so born, the elder of them endured to slay the younger; and, having committed the great and most accursed crime of fratricide, he first defiled the ground with human blood.
14. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.32, 1.92, 3.18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.32. And we must consider that the man who was formed of earth, means the mind which is to be infused into the body, but which has not yet been so infused. And this mind would be really earthly and corruptible, if it were not that God had breathed into it the spirit of genuine life; for then it "exists," and is no longer made into a soul; and its soul is not inactive, and incapable of proper formation, but a really intellectual and living one. "For man," says Moses, "became a living soul." XIII. 1.92. It is therefore very natural that Adam, that is to say the mind, when he was giving names to and displaying his comprehension of the other animals, did not give a name to himself, because he was ignorant of himself and of his own nature. A command indeed is given to man, but not to the man created according to the image and idea of God; for that being is possessed of virtue without any need of exhortation, by his own instinctive nature, but this other would not have wisdom if it had not been taught to him:
15. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.23-1.53 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 164 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

164. For it is equality which allotted night and day and light and darkness to existing things. It is equality also that divided the human race into man and woman, making two divisions, unequal in strength, but most perfectly equal for the purpose which nature had principally in view, the generation of a third human being like themselves. For, says Moses, "God made man; in the image of God created he him; male and female he created Them." He no longer says "him," but "them," in the plural number, adapting the species to the genus, which have, as I have already said, been divided with perfect equality. XXXIV.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8
aeschylus Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
alexandria Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
allegorical commentary Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159, 178
allegory Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93, 159, 178; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99; Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 12
angels Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 12
anthropology Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
armenian Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
athenaeus Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 252
baer, richard Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
catalogue of women Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
celsus Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
christianity, christian Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
comparative mythology Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
demons, demonic Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 12
ethics Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8
euphrates Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
eve Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
exposition of the law Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 178
fable, hellenistic Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
gap Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
geography, problems of Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
geography Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
hesiod Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
israel, israelites Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8
literal sense Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
lives of the patriarchs Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 178
man Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
miracle Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
moses Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8
myth, in the bible Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
myth Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
mythological Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
nimrod Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 12
on the creation of the world Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 178
on the decalogue Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 178
on the special laws Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 178
paradise Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159, 178
parallels Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
pedagogy Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8
philo Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93, 159, 178
philos colleagues Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93, 178
plausibility Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
pleasure Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 12
questions and answers Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
quotation Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 178
sarah Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
septuagint Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99
serpent Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8
souls Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8, 12
symbol Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 178
testing passim, agents of Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8
testing passim, roles in Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8, 12
textual problem Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159, 178
tigris Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
tower of babel Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 93
verisimilitude' Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 178
verisimilitude Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
virtue Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8, 12
wilderness passim, place Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8
wisdom Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 8
woman Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 99