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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9218
Philo Of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 34


nanIn this manner, also, the offspring of the outward senses, when the mind is supine and indolent, being satiated in the most unbounded degree with a superfluity of the pleasures of the outward senses, toss their heads, and frisk about, and rove about, at random, wherever they please; the eyes being opened wide to embrace every object of sight, and hastening even to feast themselves on objects which ought not to be looked at; and the ears eagerly receiving every kind of voice, and never being satisfied, but always thirsting for superfluity and the indulgence of vain curiosity and sometimes even for such delights as are but little suited to a free man. VIII.


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24 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 13.10, 14.2, 14.8, 18.20, 18.25 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

14.2. עָשׂוּ מִלְחָמָה אֶת־בֶּרַע מֶלֶךְ סְדֹם וְאֶת־בִּרְשַׁע מֶלֶךְ עֲמֹרָה שִׁנְאָב מֶלֶךְ אַדְמָה וְשֶׁמְאֵבֶר מֶלֶךְ צביים [צְבוֹיִים] וּמֶלֶךְ בֶּלַע הִיא־צֹעַר׃ 14.2. וּבָרוּךְ אֵל עֶלְיוֹן אֲשֶׁר־מִגֵּן צָרֶיךָ בְּיָדֶךָ וַיִּתֶּן־לוֹ מַעֲשֵׂר מִכֹּל׃ 14.8. וַיֵּצֵא מֶלֶךְ־סְדֹם וּמֶלֶךְ עֲמֹרָה וּמֶלֶךְ אַדְמָה וּמֶלֶךְ צביים [צְבוֹיִם] וּמֶלֶךְ בֶּלַע הִוא־צֹעַר וַיַּעַרְכוּ אִתָּם מִלְחָמָה בְּעֵמֶק הַשִּׂדִּים׃ 18.25. חָלִלָה לְּךָ מֵעֲשֹׂת כַּדָּבָר הַזֶּה לְהָמִית צַדִּיק עִם־רָשָׁע וְהָיָה כַצַּדִּיק כָּרָשָׁע חָלִלָה לָּךְ הֲשֹׁפֵט כָּל־הָאָרֶץ לֹא יַעֲשֶׂה מִשְׁפָּט׃ 13.10. And Lot lifted up his eyes, and beheld all the plain of the Jordan, that it was well watered every where, before the LORD destroyed Sodom and Gomorrah, like the garden of the LORD, like the land of Egypt, as thou goest unto Zoar." 14.2. that they made war with Bera king of Sodom, and with Birsha king of Gomorrah, Shinab king of Admah, and Shemeber king of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela—the same is Zoar." 14.8. And there went out the king of Sodom, and the king of Gomorrah, and the king of Admah, and the king of Zeboiim, and the king of Bela—the same is Zoar; and they set the battle in array against them in the vale of Siddim;" 18.20. And the LORD said: ‘Verily, the cry of Sodom and Gomorrah is great, and, verily, their sin is exceeding grievous." 18.25. That be far from Thee to do after this manner, to slay the righteous with the wicked, that so the righteous should be as the wicked; that be far from Thee; shall not the judge of all the earth do justly?’"
2. Hebrew Bible, Jeremiah, 5.8 (8th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5.8. סוּסִים מְיֻזָּנִים מַשְׁכִּים הָיוּ אִישׁ אֶל־אֵשֶׁת רֵעֵהוּ יִצְהָלוּ׃ 5.8. They are become as well-fed horses, lusty stallions; Every one neigheth after his neighbour’s wife."
3. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 16.49 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16.49. הִנֵּה־זֶה הָיָה עֲוֺן סְדֹם אֲחוֹתֵךְ גָּאוֹן שִׂבְעַת־לֶחֶם וְשַׁלְוַת הַשְׁקֵט הָיָה לָהּ וְלִבְנוֹתֶיהָ וְיַד־עָנִי וְאֶבְיוֹן לֹא הֶחֱזִיקָה׃ 16.49. Behold, this was the iniquity of thy sister Sodom: pride, fulness of bread, and careless ease was in her and in her daughters; neither did she strengthen the hand of the poor and needy."
4. Herodotus, Histories, 4.39 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4.39. This is the first peninsula. But the second, beginning with Persia, stretches to the Red Sea, and is Persian land; and next, the neighboring land of Assyria; and after Assyria, Arabia; this peninsula ends (not truly but only by common consent) at the Arabian Gulf, to which Darius brought a canal from the Nile. ,Now from the Persian country to Phoenicia there is a wide and vast tract of land; and from Phoenicia this peninsula runs beside our sea by way of the Syrian Palestine and Egypt, which is at the end of it; in this peninsula there are just three nations.
5. Menander, Fragments, 724 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

6. Menander, Fragments, 724 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

7. Menander, Fragments, 724 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

8. Menander, Fragments, 724 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

9. Menander, Fragments, 724 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

10. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 101 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

101. For the indulgences of intemperance and gluttony, and whatever other vices the immoderate and insatiable pleasures, when completely filled with an abundance of all external things, produce and bring forth, do not allow the soul to proceed onwards by the plain and straight road, but compel it to fall into ravines and gulfs, until they utterly destroy it; but those practices which adhere to patience, and endurance, and moderation, and all other virtues, keep the soul in the straight road, leaving no stumbling block in the way, against which it can stumble and fall. Very naturally, therefore, has Moses declared that temperance clings to the right way, because it is plain that the contrary habit, intemperance, is always straying from the road. XXIII.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. for they could impart their pleasures and their annoyances to one another by their sameness of language, so that they felt pleasure together and pain together; and this similarity of manners and union of feelings lasted, until being sated with the great abundance of good things which they enjoyed, as often happens, they were at last drawn on to a desire of what was unattainable, and even sent an embassy to treat for immortality, requesting to be released from old age, and to be always endowed with the vigour of youth, saying, that already one animal of their body, and that a reptile, the serpent, had received this gift; for he, having put off old age, was allowed again to grow young; and that it was absurd for the more important animals to be left behind by an inferior one, or for their whole body to be distanced by one.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 222 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

222. But even then, nevertheless, the insatiable desire which exists within them continues to rage as though it were still under the influence of hunger. "For their wine is of the vine of Sodom," as Moses says, "and their tenderils are from Gomorrah; their grapes are grapes of gall, and their branches are bitter branches. The rage of dragons is their wine, and the incurable fury of Serpents." The interpretation of the name Sodom is "barrenness and blindness." But Moses here compares those who are the slaves of greediness for wine and general gluttony, and of other most disgraceful pleasures to a vine, and to the different products of the vine;
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 228 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

228. Was it not for this reason that Abraham also, at the time of the destruction of Sodom, began at fifty and ended at Ten? Therefore, propitiating and supplicating God, entreat him that if there could be found among his creatures a complete remission so as to give them liberty, of which the sacred number of fifty is a symbol, at least the intermediate instruction which is equal in number to the decade, might be accepted for the sake of the deliverance of the soul which was about to be condemned.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 79, 155 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

155. Therefore, having laid down these to be boundaries as it were in the soul, God then, like a judge, began to consider to which side men would be most inclined by nature. And when he saw that the disposition of man had a tendency to wickedness, and was but little inclined to holiness or piety, by which qualities an immortal life is secured, he drove them forth as was very natural, and banished him from paradise; giving no hope of any subsequent restoration to his soul which had sinned in such a desperate and irremediable manner. Since even the opportunity of deceit was blameable in no slight degree, which I must not pass over in this place.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 170 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Philo of Alexandria, De Providentia, 2.12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 2.192 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.192. You see here what great effects are produced by the drunkenness of folly: bitterness, an evil disposition, exceeding gall, excessive anger, implacability, a biting and treacherous disposition. The lawgiver most emphatically asserts the branch of the vine of folly to be in Sodom; and the name Sodom, being interpreted, means "blindness," or "barrenness;" since folly is a thing which is blind, and also barren of all good things; though, nevertheless, some people have been so greatly influenced by it as to measure, and weigh, and count everything with reference to themselves alone.
18. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.304 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.304. But those men are to be pitied, and are altogether miserable, who have never banquetted on the labours of virtue; and they have remained to the end the most miserable of all men who have been always ignorant of the taste of moral excellence, when it was in their power to have feasted on and luxuriated among justice and equality. But these men are uncircumcised in their hearts, as the law expresses it, and by reason of the hardness of their hearts they are stubborn, resisting and breaking their traces in a restive manner;
19. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 2.13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.13. if any one examines them by his reason, he will find to be put in motion in an innumerable multitude of pretexts, either because of wars, or of tyrannies, or of some other unexpected events which come upon nations through the various alterations and innovations of fortune; and very often luxury, abounding in all kind of superfluity and unbounded extravagance, has overturned laws, from the multitude not being able to bear unlimited prosperity, but having a tendency to become insolent through satiety, and insolence is in opposition to law.
20. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.213 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 2.43, 4.23, 4.51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

22. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 4.483-4.484 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4.483. The country of Sodom borders upon it. It was of old a most happy land, both for the fruits it bore and the riches of its cities, although it be now all burnt up. 4.484. It is related how, for the impiety of its inhabitants, it was burnt by lightning; in consequence of which there are still the remainders of that Divine fire, and the traces [or shadows] of the five cities are still to be seen, as well as the ashes growing in their fruits; which fruits have a color as if they were fit to be eaten, but if you pluck them with your hands, they dissolve into smoke and ashes.
23. Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

109a. מאן נשדר נשדר בהדי נחום איש גם זו דמלומד בנסים הוא,כי מטא לההוא דיורא בעא למיבת אמרי ליה מאי איכא בהדך אמר להו קא מובילנא כרגא לקיסר קמו בליליא שרינהו לסיפטיה ושקלו כל דהוה גביה ומלנהו עפרא כי מטא להתם אישתכח עפרא אמר אחוכי קא מחייכי בי יהודאי אפקוהו למקטליה אמר גם זו לטובה אתא אליהו ואידמי להו כחד מינייהו אמר להו דילמא האי עפרא מעפרא דאברהם אבינו הוא דהוה שדי עפרא הוו חרבי גילי הוו גירי בדוק ואשכחו הכי,הוה מחוזא דלא הוו קא יכלי ליה למיכבשיה שדו מההוא עפרא עליה וכבשוה עיילוהו לבי גנזא אמרי שקול דניחא לך מלייה לסיפטא דהבא כי הדר אתא אמרו ליה הנך דיורי מאי אמטית לבי מלכא אמר להו מאי דשקלי מהכא אמטאי להתם שקלי אינהו אמטו להתם קטלינהו להנך דיורי:,דור הפלגה אין להם חלק לעולם הבא וכו': מאי עבוד אמרי דבי רבי שילא נבנה מגדל ונעלה לרקיע ונכה אותו בקרדומות כדי שיזובו מימיו מחכו עלה במערבא א"כ ליבנו אחד בטורא,(אלא) א"ר ירמיה בר אלעזר נחלקו לג' כיתות אחת אומרת נעלה ונשב שם ואחת אומרת נעלה ונעבוד עבודת כוכבים ואחת אומרת נעלה ונעשה מלחמה זו שאומרת נעלה ונשב שם הפיצם ה' וזו שאומרת נעלה ונעשה מלחמה נעשו קופים ורוחות ושידים ולילין וזו שאומרת נעלה ונעבוד עבודת כוכבים (בראשית יא, ט) כי שם בלל ה' שפת כל הארץ,תניא רבי נתן אומר כולם לשם עבודת כוכבים נתכוונו כתיב הכא (בראשית יא, ד) נעשה לנו שם וכתיב התם (שמות כג, יג) ושם אלהים אחרים לא תזכירו מה להלן עבודת כוכבים אף כאן עבודת כוכבים,אמר רבי יוחנן מגדל שליש נשרף שליש נבלע שליש קיים אמר רב אויר מגדל משכח אמר רב יוסף בבל ובורסיף סימן רע לתורה מאי בורסיף אמר ר' אסי בור שאפי:,אנשי סדום אין להם חלק לעולם הבא וכו': ת"ר אנשי סדום אין להן חלק לעולם הבא שנאמר (בראשית יג, יג) ואנשי סדום רעים וחטאים לה' מאד רעים בעוה"ז וחטאים לעולם הבא,אמר רב יהודה רעים בגופן וחטאים בממונם רעים בגופן דכתיב (בראשית לט, ט) ואיך אעשה הרעה הגדולה הזאת וחטאתי לאלהים וחטאים בממונם דכתיב (דברים טו, ט) והיה בך חטא לה' זו ברכת השם מאד שמתכוונים וחוטאים,במתניתא תנא רעים בממונם וחטאים בגופן רעים בממונם דכתיב (דברים טו, ט) ורעה עינך באחיך האביון וחטאים בגופן דכתיב (בראשית לט, ט) וחטאתי לאלהים לה' זו ברכת השם מאד זו שפיכות דמים שנאמר (מלכים ב כא, טז) גם דם נקי שפך מנשה (בירושלים) הרבה מאד [וגו'],ת"ר אנשי סדום לא נתגאו אלא בשביל טובה שהשפיע להם הקב"ה ומה כתיב בהם (איוב כח, ה) ארץ ממנה יצא לחם ותחתיה נהפך כמו אש מקום ספיר אבניה ועפרות זהב לו נתיב לא ידעו עיט ולא שזפתו עין איה לא הדריכוהו בני שחץ לא עדה עליו שחל,אמרו וכי מאחר שארץ ממנה יצא לחם ועפרות זהב לו למה לנו עוברי דרכים שאין באים אלינו אלא לחסרינו [מממוננו] בואו ונשכח תורת רגל מארצנו שנאמר (איוב כח, ד) פרץ נחל מעם גר הנשכחים מני רגל דלו מאנוש נעו,דרש רבא מאי דכתיב (תהלים סב, ד) עד אנה תהותתו על איש תרצחו כולכם כקיר נטוי גדר הדחויה מלמד שהיו נותנין עיניהן בבעלי ממון ומושיבין אותו אצל קיר נטוי ודוחין אותו עליו ובאים ונוטלין את ממונו,דרש רבא מאי דכתיב (איוב כד, טז) חתר בחשך בתים יומם חתמו למו לא (ראו) [ידעו] אור מלמד שהיו נותנים עיניהם בבעלי ממון ומפקידים אצלו אפרסמון ומניחים אותו בבית גנזיהם לערב באים ומריחין אותו ככלב שנא' (תהלים נט, ז) ישובו לערב יהמו ככלב ויסובבו עיר ובאים וחותרים שם ונוטלין אותו ממון,(איוב כד, י) ערום הלכו מבלי לבוש ואין כסות בקרה חמור יתומים ינהגו יחבלו שור אלמנה גבולות ישיגו עדר גזלו וירעו (איוב כא, לב) והוא לקברות יובל ועל גדיש ישקוד,דרש ר' יוסי בציפורי אחתרין ההיא ליליא תלת מאה מחתרתא בציפורי אתו וקא מצערי ליה אמרו ליה יהבית אורחיה לגנבי אמר להו מי הוה ידענא דאתו גנבי כי קא נח נפשיה דרבי יוסי שפעי מרזבי דציפורי דמא,אמרי דאית ליה חד תורא מרעי חד יומא דלית ליה לירעי תרי יומי ההוא יתמא בר ארמלתא הבו ליה תורי למרעיה אזל שקלינהו וקטלינהו אמר להו 109a. bwhom shall we sendthe gift? They decided: bWe will sendit bwith Naḥum of Gam Zo, as he is experienced in miracles. /b, bWhen he reached a certain lodging, he sought to sleepthere. The residents of that lodging bsaid to him: Whatdo you bhave with you?Naḥum bsaid to them: I am taking the head tax to the emperor. They rose in the night, opened his chest and took everything that was in it, andthen bfilledthe chest bwith dirt. When he arrived there,in Rome, bearth was discoveredin the chest. The emperor bsaid: The Jews are mocking meby giving me this gift. bThey tookNaḥum bout to kill him.Naḥum bsaid: This too is for the best. Elijahthe prophet bcame and appeared to them as one ofNaḥum’s traveling party. Elijah bsaid to them: Perhaps this earth is from the earth of Abraham our forefather, who would throw dustand bit became swords,and who would throw bstrawand bit became arrows. They examinedthe dust band discoveredthat it was indeed the dust of Abraham., bThere was a province thatthe Romans bwere unable to conquer. They threwsome bof this earth uponthat province band they conquered it.In appreciation for the gift that Naḥum of Gam Zo had brought on behalf of the Jewish people, bthey brought him into the treasuryand bsaid: Takethat bwhich is preferable to you. He filled his chestwith bgold. When he returnedto that lodging, bthose residents said to him: What did you bring to the king’s palace?Naḥum bsaid to them: What I took from here, I brought to there.The residents concluded that the earth with which they had filled the chest had miraculous properties. bThey tookearth and bbrought it tothe emperor. Once the Romans discovered that the earth was ineffective in battle, bthey executed those residents. /b,§ The mishna teaches that the members of bthe generation of the dispersion have no share in the World-to-Come.The Gemara asks: bWhatsin bdid they perform?Their sin is not explicitly delineated in the Torah. bThe school of Rabbi Sheila saythat the builders of the Tower of Babel said: bWe will build a tower and ascend to heaven, and we will strike it with axes so that its waters will flow. They laughed atthis explanation bin the West,Eretz Yisrael, and asked: bIfthat was their objective, blet them builda tower bon a mountain;why did they build it specifically in a valley (see Genesis 11:2)?, bRather, Rabbi Yirmeya bar Elazar says: They divided into three factions; one said: Let us ascendto the top of the tower band dwell there. And one said: Let us ascendto the top of the tower band engage in idol worship. And one said: Let us ascendto the top of the tower band wage war.With regard to bthatfaction bthat said: Let us ascendto the top of the tower band dwell there, God dispersed them. And thatfaction bthat said: Let us ascendto the top of the tower band wage war, became apes, and spirits, and demons, and female demons. Andwith regard to bthatfaction bthat said: Let us ascendto the top of the tower band engage in idol wor-ship,it is written: b“Because there the Lord confounded the language of all the earth”(Genesis 11:9)., bIt is taughtin a ibaraita /i: bRabbi Natan says: All ofthose factions bintendedto build the tower bfor the sake of idol worship. It is written here: “And let us make a name for us”(Genesis 11:4), band it is written there: “And make no mention of the name of the other gods”(Exodus 23:13). bJust as there,the connotation of “name” bis idol worship, so too here,the connotation of “name” bis idol worship. /b, bRabbi Yoḥa says: Theuppermost bthirdof the btower was burned,the lowermost bthirdof the tower bwas swallowedinto the earth, and the middle bthird remainedintact. bRav says: The atmosphere of the tower causes forgetfulness;anyone who goes there forgets what he has learned. As a result of the building of the tower, forgetting was introduced into the world. bRav Yosef says: Babylonia andthe adjacent place, bBursif, areeach ba bad omen for Torah,i.e., they cause one to forget his knowledge. The Gemara asks: bWhatis the meaning of bBursif? Rabbi Asi says:It is an abbreviation of bempty pit [ ibor shafi /i]. /b,§ The mishna teaches: bThe people of Sodom have no share in the World-to-Come. The Sages taught: The people of Sodom have no share in the World-to-Come, as it is stated: “And the men of Sodom were wicked and sinners before the Lord exceedingly”(Genesis 13:13). b“Wicked”indicates bin this world; “and sinners”indicates bfor the World-to-Come. /b, bRav Yehuda says: “Wicked”is referring to sins they committed bwith their bodies; “and sinners”is referring to sins they committed bwith their money. “Wicked”is referring to sins they committed bwith their bodies, as it is writtenwith regard to Joseph and the wife of Potiphar: b“And how can I do this great wickedness, and sin against God”(Genesis 39:9). b“And sinners”is referring to sins they committed bwith their money, as it is written:“And your eye is wicked against your poor brother, and you give him nothing… bfor it shall be reckoned to you as a sin”(Deuteronomy 15:9). b“Before the Lord”; thisis referring to bblessing,a euphemism for cursing, bGod. “Exceedingly”means bthat they had intent and sinnedand did not sin unwittingly or driven by lust., bIt was taught in a ibaraita /i: “Wicked”is referring to sins they committed bwith their money; “and sinners”is referring to sins they committed bwith their bodies. “Wicked”is referring to sins they committed bwith their money, as it is written: “And your eye is wicked against your poor brotherand you give him nothing” (Deuteronomy 15:9). b“And sinners”is referring to sins they committed bwith their bodies, as it is writtenwith regard to Joseph and the wife of Potiphar: b“And sin against God”(Genesis 39:9). b“Before the Lord”; thisis referring to bblessing,a euphemism for cursing, bGod. “Exceedingly [ imeod]”is referring to bbloodshed, as it is stated: “Moreover Manasseh shed very [ imeod] much blood”(II Kings 21:16)., bThe Sages taught: The people of Sodom became haughtyand sinned bdue only to theexcessive bgoodness that the Holy One, Blessed be He, bestowed upon them. And what is written concerning them,indicating that goodness? b“As for the earth, out of it comes bread, and underneath it is turned up as it were by fire. Its stones are the place of sapphires, and it has dust of gold. That path no bird of prey knows, neither has the falcon’s eye seen it. The proud beasts have not trodden it, nor has the lion passed thereby”(Job 28:5–8). The reference is to the city of Sodom, which was later overturned, as it is stated thereafter: “He puts forth His hand upon the flinty rock; He overturns the mountains by the roots” (Job 28:9).,The people of Sodom bsaid: Sincewe live in ba land from which bread comes and has the dust of gold,we have everything that we need. bWhy do we need travelers, as they come only to divest us of our property? Come, let us cause theproper btreatment of travelers to be forgotten from our land, as it is stated: “He breaks open a watercourse in a place far from inhabitants, forgotten by pedestrians, they are dried up, they have moved away from men”(Job 28:4)., bRava taught: Whatis the meaning of that bwhich is written: “How long will you seek to overwhelm a man? You will all be murdered like a leaning wall or a tottering fence”(Psalms 62:4)? This bteaches thatthe people of Sodom bset their sights on property owners.They would take one band place him alongside an inclined,flimsy bwallthat was about to fall, band push it upon himto kill him, bandthen btheywould bcome and take his property. /b, bRava taught: Whatis the meaning of that bwhich is written: “In the dark they dig through houses; by day they shut themselves up; they know not the light”(Job 24:16)? This bteaches that they would set their sights on property owners.They would take one bandthey would bgive him balsam,whose smell diffuses, bandthe property owner would bplace it in his treasury. In the evening,the people of Sodom bwould come and sniff itout blike a dogand discover the location of the property owner’s treasury, bas it is stated: “They return at evening; they howl like a dog, and go round about the city”(Psalms 59:7). bAndafter discovering the location bthey would come and dig there, and they would take that property. /b,The Gemara cites verses that allude to the practices of the people of Sodom: b“They lie at night naked without clothing, and they have no covering in the cold”(Job 24:7). And likewise: b“They drive away the donkey of the fatherless; they take the widow’s ox as a pledge”(Job 24:3). And likewise: b“They trespass; they violently steal flocks and graze them”(Job 24:2). And likewise: b“For he is brought to the grave, and watch is kept over his tomb”(Job 21:32)., bRabbi Yosei taught in Tzipporithe methods of theft employed in Sodom. bThat night three hundred tunnels were excavated in Tzipporiin order to employ those methods. Homeowners bcame and harassed him; they said to him: You have given a way for thievesto steal. Rabbi Yosei bsaid to them: Did I know that thieves would comeas a result of my lecture? The Gemara relates: bWhen Rabbi Yosei died, the gutters of Tzipporimiraculously boverflowedwith bbloodas a sign of his death.,The people of Sodom bwould say:Anyone bwho has one ox shall herdthe city’s oxen bfor one day.Anyone bwho does not haveany oxen bshall herdthe city’s oxen bfor two days.The Gemara relates: bThey gave oxen to a certain orphan, son of a widow, to herd. He wentand btook them and killed them.The orphan bsaidto the people of Sodom:
24. Anon., Pirqe Rabbi Eliezer, 25



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaeus (governor of asia) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 215
allegorical commentary Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 5
arrogance Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
athenaeus (author), formulae of expression Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 215
athenaeus (author) Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 215
cohn, l. Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 5
de plantatione, chronology Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 5
gluttony Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281; Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 215
god, as judge Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281, 282
gomorrah Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
homosexual behavior, as contrary to nature Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 282
homosexual behavior, as the sin of sodom Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281, 282
law of nature, procreation as Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 282
law of nature, sodomites abandoning Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 282
massebieau, l. Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 5
noah Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 5
pentapolis Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
philo judaeus Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 215
questions and answers' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 5
reproduction, as law of nature Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 282
segor (tsoʿar) Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
sexual behavior, lack of restraint/licentiousness Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 215
sexual license Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
sin, arrogance as Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
sin, gluttony as Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
sin, homosexual behavior as Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281, 282
sin, sexual license as Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
sodom, arrogance as sin of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
sodom, arrogance causing Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
sodom, homosexual behavior and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281, 282
sodom, homosexuality as sin of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
sodom, literal and ethical interpretations of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281, 282
sodom, prosperity of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 282
sodom, sodomite cities, destruction of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281, 282
sodom Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281
syria-palestine Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 281