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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9218
Philo Of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 2


nanBut Moses, through the exceeding abundance of his knowledge of all things, was accustomed to affix the most felicitous and expressive appellations to them. Accordingly, in many passages of the law, we shall find this opinion, which we have expressed, confirmed by the fact, and not least in the passage which we have cited at the beginning of this treatise, in which the just Noah is represented as a husbandman.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 33.9 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

33.9. הָאֹמֵר לְאָבִיו וּלְאִמּוֹ לֹא רְאִיתִיו וְאֶת־אֶחָיו לֹא הִכִּיר וְאֶת־בנו [בָּנָיו] לֹא יָדָע כִּי שָׁמְרוּ אִמְרָתֶךָ וּבְרִיתְךָ יִנְצֹרוּ׃ 33.9. Who said of his father, and of his mother: ‘I have not seen him’; Neither did he acknowledge his brethren, Nor knew he his own children; For they have observed Thy word, And keep Thy covet."
2. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, a b c d\n0 "33.23" "33.23" "33 23"\n1 3.14 3.14 3 14 \n2 3.15 3.15 3 15 \n3 33.11 33.11 33 11 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 5.29, 6.9, 7.11, 9.21, 16.14-16.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5.29. וַיִּקְרָא אֶת־שְׁמוֹ נֹחַ לֵאמֹר זֶה יְנַחֲמֵנוּ מִמַּעֲשֵׂנוּ וּמֵעִצְּבוֹן יָדֵינוּ מִן־הָאֲדָמָה אֲשֶׁר אֵרְרָהּ יְהוָה׃ 6.9. אֵלֶּה תּוֹלְדֹת נֹחַ נֹחַ אִישׁ צַדִּיק תָּמִים הָיָה בְּדֹרֹתָיו אֶת־הָאֱלֹהִים הִתְהַלֶּךְ־נֹחַ׃ 7.11. בִּשְׁנַת שֵׁשׁ־מֵאוֹת שָׁנָה לְחַיֵּי־נֹחַ בַּחֹדֶשׁ הַשֵּׁנִי בְּשִׁבְעָה־עָשָׂר יוֹם לַחֹדֶשׁ בַּיּוֹם הַזֶּה נִבְקְעוּ כָּל־מַעְיְנֹת תְּהוֹם רַבָּה וַאֲרֻבֹּת הַשָּׁמַיִם נִפְתָּחוּ׃ 9.21. וַיֵּשְׁתְּ מִן־הַיַּיִן וַיִּשְׁכָּר וַיִּתְגַּל בְּתוֹךְ אָהֳלֹה׃ 16.14. עַל־כֵּן קָרָא לַבְּאֵר בְּאֵר לַחַי רֹאִי הִנֵּה בֵין־קָדֵשׁ וּבֵין בָּרֶד׃ 16.15. וַתֵּלֶד הָגָר לְאַבְרָם בֵּן וַיִּקְרָא אַבְרָם שֶׁם־בְּנוֹ אֲשֶׁר־יָלְדָה הָגָר יִשְׁמָעֵאל׃ 16.16. וְאַבְרָם בֶּן־שְׁמֹנִים שָׁנָה וְשֵׁשׁ שָׁנִים בְּלֶדֶת־הָגָר אֶת־יִשְׁמָעֵאל לְאַבְרָם׃ 5.29. And he called his name Noah, saying: ‘This same shall comfort us in our work and in the toil of our hands, which cometh from the ground which the LORD hath cursed.’" 6.9. These are the generations of Noah. Noah was in his generations a man righteous and wholehearted; Noah walked with God." 7.11. In the six hundredth year of Noah’s life, in the second month, on the seventeenth day of the month, on the same day were all the fountains of the great deep broken up, and the windows of heaven were opened." 9.21. And he drank of the wine, and was drunken; and he was uncovered within his tent." 16.14. Wherefore the well was called Beer-lahai-roi; behold, it is between Kadesh and Bered." 16.15. And Hagar bore Abram a son; and Abram called the name of his son," 16.16. And Abram was fourscore and six years old, when Hagar bore Ishmael to Abram."
4. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 10.4 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.4. When the earth was flooded because of him,wisdom again saved it,steering the righteous man by a paltry piece of wood.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 10, 14-15, 181, 20, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. And Noah began to be a husbandman; and he planted a vineyard, and he drank of the wine, and he was drunk in his House." The generality of men not understanding the nature of things, do also of necessity err with respect to the composition of names; for those who consider affairs anatomically, as it were, are easily able to affix appropriate names to things, but those who look at them in a confused and irregular way are incapable of such accuracy.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 56-57, 87, 13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. And it follows of necessity that when the mind goes forth from any imagination of God, by which it would be good and expedient for it to be supported, then immediately, after the fashion of a ship, which is tossed in the sea, when the winds oppose it with great violence, it is tossed about in every direction, having disturbance as it were for its country and its home, a thing which is the most contrary of all things to steadiness of soul, which is engendered by joy, which is a term synonymous with Eden. V. 13. Very naturally therefore, having led his people from the injurious associations prevailing in the cities, into the desert, that he might purify their souls from their offences he begun to bring them food for their minds; and what could this food be but divine laws and reasonings?
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 23 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

23. of this great evil, that great deluge described by the lawgiver is an image; for the torrents from heaven continually pouring down cataracts of wickedness itself with impetuous violence, and springs from the ground (by which I mean the body) continually bursting up and pouring forth streams of every passion in great numbers and vast size, which, uniting an being mingled in the same stream with the other waters, are thrown into confusion, and overthrow the whole region of the soul which has received them with incessant eddies and whirlpools.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 119 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 192 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

192. This is that great deluge in which "the cataracts of heaven were opened"58--by heaven I here mean the mind--and the fountains of the bottomless pit were revealed; that is to say, of the outward sense; for in this way alone is the soul overwhelmed, iniquities being broken up and poured over it from above, as from the heaven of the mind, and the passions irrigating it from below, as from the earth of the outward senses.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 189, 4-5, 54, 56, 6-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. And what wonder is there if the living God is beyond the reach of the comprehension of man, when even the mind that is in each of us is unintelligible and unknown to us? Who has ever beheld the essence of the soul? the obscure nature of which has given rise to an infinite number of contests among the sophists who have brought forward opposite opinions, some of which are inconsistent with any kind of nature.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On Planting, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 48, 22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

22. It is worth while also to consider the wickedness into which a man who flies from the face of God is driven, since it is called a tempest. The law-giver showing, by this expression, that he who gives way to inconsiderate impulses without any stability or firmness exposes himself to surf and violent tossing, like those of the sea, when it is agitated in the winter season by contrary winds, and has never even a single glimpse of calm or tranquillity. But as when a ship having been tossed in the sea is agitated, it is then no longer fit to take a voyage or to anchor in harbour, but being tossed about hither and thither it leans first to one side and then to the other, and struggles in vain against the waves; so the wicked man, yielding to a perverse and insane disposition, and being unable to regulate his voyage through life without disaster, is constantly tossed about in perpetual expectation of an overturning of his life.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.112 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.112. for he does not display a half-complete power, but one which is perfect in every part. Inasmuch, as even if it were to fail in his endeavour, and in any conceptions which may have been formed, or efforts which may have been made, it still can have recourse to the third species of assistance, namely, consolation. For speech is, as it were, a medicine for the wounds of the soul, and a saving remedy for its passions, which, "even before the setting of the sun," the lawgiver says one must restore: that is to say, before the all-brilliant beams of the almighty and all-glorious God are obscured, which he, out of pity for our race, sends down from heaven upon the human mind.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 4.135 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.135. We have spoken before of that queen of all the virtues, piety and holiness, and also of prudence and moderation; we must now proceed to speak of justice which is conversant about subjects which are akin and nearly related to Them.{33}{yonge's translation includes a separate treatise title at this point: On Justice. The publisher has elected to follow the Loeb numbering.}XXVI.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 95 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

95. The laws Command that the people should offer to the priests first fruits of corn, and wine, and oil, and of their domestic flocks, and of wools. But that of the crops which are produced in the fields, and of the fruits of the trees, they should bring in full baskets in proportion to the extent of their lands; with hymns made in praise of God, which the sacred volumes preserve recorded in writing. And, moreover, they were not to reckon the first-born of the oxen, and sheep, and goats in their herds and flocks as if they were their own, but were to look upon these also as first-fruits, in order that, being thus trained partly to honour God, and partly also not to seek for every possible gain, they might be adorned with those chief virtues, piety and humanity.
16. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.77 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.97, 2.45 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 122-123, 141, 121 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

121. From that soul therefore, in which justice has brought forth a male offspring, that is to say just thoughts, it has also at the same time removed all painful things, and the birth of Noah will bear testimony in confirmation of this, and the interpretation of the name of Noah is just; and of him it is said, "he will make us to rest from our works, and from the labours of our hands, and from the earth, which the Lord God has Cursed;
19. Philo of Alexandria, That God Is Unchangeable, 175, 116 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

116. Reject therefore with all your might all idea of pleasing the keepers of the prison; but on the contrary, with all your ability and all your earnestness, labour to please him who is the cause of all things; and if you are unable to do so, (for the greatness of his dignity is exceeding high), at all events advance, without ever turning back, towards his powers, and present yourself to them as their suppliant, until they admitting the continual assiduity and sincerity of your service, place you in the ranks of those who have pleased them, as they did Noah, of whose descendants Moses has made a most admirable and novel catalogue;
20. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. In the former part of this treatise we have spoken of the art of husbandry as to its genus, dwelling on it at as great a length as the time admitted of; but in this book we will discuss the question of his cultivation of his vineyard with regard to the species as far as it is in our power. For Moses represents the just Noah not only as a husbandman, but also especially as occupied with the cultivation of vines, saying, "Noah began to be a husbandman of the earth; and he planted a Vineyard.
21. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.124 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.124. He will, however, submit to training to augment his powers of bodily endurance.And the wise man, they say, will offer prayers, and ask for good things from the gods: so Posidonius in the first book of his treatise On Duties, and Hecato in his third book On Paradoxes. Friendship, they declare, exists only between the wise and good, by reason of their likeness to one another. And by friendship they mean a common use of all that has to do with life, wherein we treat our friends as we should ourselves. They argue that a friend is worth having for his own sake and that it is a good thing to have many friends. But among the bad there is, they hold, no such thing as friendship, and thus no bad man has a friend. Another of their tenets is that the unwise are all mad, inasmuch as they are not wise but do what they do from that madness which is the equivalent of their folly.
22. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 3.682



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abram/abraham, as visionary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 131
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 131
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 131
allegory/allegoresis, arithmological Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 131
allotment of god/the lord Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
ambrose Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 261
arithmology, ninety-nine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 131
attributes, divine, ineffable Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 152
bodies and realities Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 149
chaldean (hebrew language) Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
cycle, patriarchal, abrahamic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 131
enos, nautical imagery for Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
etymologies, of noah Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177, 186
eudorus of alexandria Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 149
five, the number, allegorical interpretation of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
genealogy of virtues Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
greek culture Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
hebrew, and chaldean Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
homonymy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 152
imagery, nautical Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 261
inebriation Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 261
inheritance of god/the lord Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 131
israel, nation/people Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 152
israel Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 152
justice, as leader of virtues Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
justice, of noah Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177, 186
justice, piety and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
levites Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
logos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 149, 152
mangey, t. Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
moses, lawgiver Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 149
nautical metaphors Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
noah, as a sage Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
noah, drunken Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 261
noah, name of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177, 186
noah, omissions in account of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
noah, the flood and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
noah Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177, 186
perfection, vs. half-completed Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
piety, justice and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 149
procopius Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 261
rest, noahs name meaning Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177, 186
rest, sabbath and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
sabbath Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
sage/wise person Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181, 261
sapiens Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
senses, five Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 261
socrates Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 152; Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
soul, flooding in Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 186
stoa/stoic/stoicism, paradox Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
stobaeus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 261
suppliant' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 181
the sage, as stoic ideal Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
triads, first Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177, 186
virtue, justice as leader of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 149, 152
δικαιοσύνη Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177
εὐσέβεια Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 177