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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9225
Philo Of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 150-153


nanWho gave the pledge? Why the mind, forsooth, which was eager to purchase the most excellent possession, piety towards God, by three pledges or symbols, namely a ring, and an armlet, and a staff, signifying confidence and sure faith; the connection and union of reason with life, and of life with reason; and upright and unchanging instruction on which it is profitable to rely.


nanTherefore he examines the question as to whether he had properly given this pledge. What, then, is the examination? To throw down some bait having an attractive power, such as glory, or riches, or bodily health, or something similar, and to see to which it will incline, like the balance in a scale; for if there is any inclination to any one of these things the pledge is not sure. Therefore he sent a kid in order to recover back his pledge from the woman, not because he had determined by all means to recover it, but only in the case of her being unworthy to retain it.


nanAnd when will this be? when she willingly exchanges what is of importance for what is indifferent, preferring spurious to genuine good. Now the genuine good things are faith, the connection and union of words with deeds, and the rule of right instruction, as on the other hand the evils are, faithlessness, a want of such connection between words and deeds, and ignorance. And spurious goods are those which depend upon appetite devoid of reason;


nanfor "when he sought her he did not find her;" for what is good is hard to be found, or, one may even say, is utterly impossible to be found in a confused life. And if one inquires whether the soul, which is a harlot, is in every place of virtue, one will be distinctly told that it is not, and that it has not been previously; for a common, unchaste, and wanton, and utterly shameless woman, selling the flower of her beauty at a low price, and making her external parts both bright with purifications and washings, but leaving her inward parts unclean and vile, and being like pictures painted with colours about the face because of the absence of all natural beauty; she who pursues that promiscuous evil called the vice of having many husbands, as if it were a good, coveting polygamy, and laying herself open for infinite variety, and being mocked and insulted at the same time by ten thousand bodies and things, "is not there.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, a b c d\n0 "32.4" "32.4" "32 4" (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "29.31" "29.31" "29 31" \n1 38 38 38 None\n2 38.14 38.14 38 14 \n3 38.15 38.15 38 15 \n4 38.16 38.16 38 16 \n5 38.17 38.17 38 17 \n6 38.18 38.18 38 18 \n7 38.19 38.19 38 19 \n8 38.20 38.20 38 20 \n9 38.21 38.21 38 21 \n10 38.22 38.22 38 22 \n11 38.23 38.23 38 23 \n12 38.24 38.24 38 24 \n13 38.25 38.25 38 25 \n14 38.26 38.26 38 26 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 37, 36 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 3-4, 40-41, 5-10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Why then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV. 10. He also considered this point, in the second place, that it is indispensable that the soul of the man who is about to receive sacred laws should be thoroughly cleansed and purified from all stains, however difficult to be washed out, which the promiscuous multitude of mixed men from all quarters has impregnated cities with;
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 125, 124 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

124. But there are times when virtue, as if making experiment of those who come to her as pupils, to see how much eagerness they have, does not come forward to meet them, but veiling her face like Tamar, sits down in the public road, giving room to those who are traveling along the road to look upon her as a harlot, in order that those who are over curious on the subject may take off her veil and disclose her features, and may behold the untouched, and unpolluted, and most exquisite, and truly virgin beauty of modesty and chastity.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 151-156, 149 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

149. Nor does he, who is sent forth to search for that virtue which is invincible and embittered against the ridiculous pursuits of men, by name Tamar, find her. And this failure of his is strictly in accordance with nature; for we read in the scripture, "And Judah sent a kid in the hands of his shepherd, the Adullamite, to receive back his pledge from the woman, and he found her not: and he asked the men of the place, Where is the harlot who was in Ae by the wayside? and they said, There is no harlot in this place. And he returned back to Judah, and said unto him, I have not found her, and the men of the place say that there is no harlot there. And Judah said, Let her keep the things, only let me not be made a laughing-stock, I because I have sent the kid, and you because you have not found Her." Oh, the admirable trial! oh, the temptation becoming sacred things!
7. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 44, 43 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 225 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

225. for there is never a scarcity of avengers against those who violate treaties; but even though some persons fancy there may be, they will only fancy it, and will in the reality of the fact be proved to entertain a false opinion. For justice hates the wicked, and is implacable, and a relentless avenger of all unrighteous actions, overthrowing the ranks of those who defile virtue, and when they are overthrown, then again the soul, which before appeared to be defiled, changes and returns to its virgin state. I say, which appeared to be defiled, because, in fact, it never was defiled; for of involuntary accidents that which affects the patient is not in reality his suffering, just as what is done by a person who does wrong unintentionally, the wrong is not really his action.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 131-136, 139, 143-144, 147, 152, 194, 130 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

130. Having now discussed at sufficient length the subject of change and alteration of names, we will turn to the matters which come next in order in our proposed examination. Immediately after the events which we have just mentioned, came the birth of Isaac; for after God had given to his mother the name of Sarrah instead of Sarah, he said to Abraham, "I will give unto thee a Son." We must consider each of the things here indicated particularly.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 157-166, 152 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

152. And she, in like manner, beholding a creature greatly resembling herself, rejoiced also, and addressed him in reply with due modesty. And love being engendered, and, as it were, uniting two separate portions of one animal into one body, adapted them to each other, implanting in each of them a desire of connection with the other with a view to the generation of a being similar to themselves. And this desire caused likewise pleasure to their bodies, which is the beginning of iniquities and transgressions, and it is owing to this that men have exchanged their previously immortal and happy existence for one which is mortal and full of misfortune. LVI.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 28-30, 27 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

27. Let these men, then, hang by their appetites as by a halter; but the wise Abraham, where he stands, comes near to God, who is also standing. For Moses says that "Abraham was standing near to God; and coming nigh unto him, he Said,"... For in good truth the unalterable soul is the only thing that has access to the unalterable God; and being of such a disposition, it does really stand very near to the Divine power.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 2.44 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.44. After that he puts on a golden necklace, a most illustrious halter, the circlet and wheel of interminable necessity, not the consequence and regular order of things in life, nor the connection of the affairs of nature as Thamar was; for her ornament was not a necklace, but an armlet. Moreover, he assumes a ring, a royal gift which is no gift, a pledge devoid of good faith, the very contrary gift to that which was given to the same Thamar by Judah the son of the seeing king, Israel;
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 221 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

221. for Tamar was a woman from Syria Palestina, who had been bred up in her own native city, which was devoted to the worship of many gods, being full of statues, and images, and, in short, of idols of every kind and description. But when she, emerging, as it were, out of profound darkness, was able to see a slight beam of truth, she then, at the risk of her life, exerted all her energies to arrive at piety, caring little for life if she could not live virtuously; and living virtuously was exactly identical with living for the service of and in constant supplication to the one true God.
14. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.217-3.219, 3.237 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 1.21-1.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. New Testament, Matthew, 1.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.3. Judah became the father of Perez and Zerah by Tamar. Perez became the father of Hezron. Hezron became the father of Ram.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
abram/abraham, faith and doubt of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 456
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
allegory Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 175; Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 10
colson, f. h. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 175
david Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
delphi Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
dinah Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 175
doubt Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 456
dreams Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
education Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 456
faith Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 456
god, promise of Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
homer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 456
inspiration Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
jacob Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 10
jesus christ, in matthew Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
jew/jewish, literature/ authors Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
joseph Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 10
judah Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 175
judah (person) Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
laban Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 10
law, god's" '151.0_257.0@matthew Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
leah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
literature Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
messiah Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 456
paul (saul) Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
perez Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
perfection Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 456
philo judaeus Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
pleasure Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 10
potiphars wife Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 10
preaching, rule of truth Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 130
rachel Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
salvation Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386
sex/sexuality Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
souls Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 10
spirit, and translation issues' Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
spirit, characterizations as, breath (life itself) Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
spirit, characterizations as, seal/pledge Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
spirit, modes of presence, indwelling Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
spirit, modes of presence, receiving of Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257
tamar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386; Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 257; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 175; Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 10
valentinians Iricinschi et al., Beyond the Gnostic Gospels: Studies Building on the Work of Elaine Pagels (2013) 130
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386; Smith and Stuckenbruck, Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts (2020) 10
zipporah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 386