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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9238
Philo Of Alexandria, On Dreams, 2.249


nanAnd who can pour over the happy soul which proffers its own reason as the most sacred cup, the holy goblets of true joy, except the cup-bearer of God, the master of the feast, the word? not differing from the draught itself, but being itself in an unmixed state, the pure delight and sweetness, and pouring forth, and joy, and ambrosial medicine of pleasure and happiness; if we too may, for a moment, employ the language of the poets. XXXVIII.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 6.12, 7.29 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6.12. Wisdom is radiant and unfading,and she is easily discerned by those who love her,and is found by those who seek her. 7.29. For she is more beautiful than the sun,and excels every constellation of the stars. Compared with the light she is found to be superior
2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. And it follows of necessity that when the mind goes forth from any imagination of God, by which it would be good and expedient for it to be supported, then immediately, after the fashion of a ship, which is tossed in the sea, when the winds oppose it with great violence, it is tossed about in every direction, having disturbance as it were for its country and its home, a thing which is the most contrary of all things to steadiness of soul, which is engendered by joy, which is a term synonymous with Eden. V. 13. Very naturally therefore, having led his people from the injurious associations prevailing in the cities, into the desert, that he might purify their souls from their offences he begun to bring them food for their minds; and what could this food be but divine laws and reasonings?
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 32-36, 63, 31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

31. And if you ever to go a drinking party or to a costly entertainment, go with a good confidence; for you will put to shame the intemperate man by your own dexterity. For he, falling on his belly, and opening his insatiable desires even before he opens his mouth, will glut himself in a most shameless and indecorous manner, and will seize the things belonging to his neighbour, and will lick up everything without thinking. And when he is completely sated with eating, then drinking, as the poets say, with his mouth open, he will make himself an object for the laughter and ridicule of all those who behold him.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 154 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

154. And these statements appear to me to be dictated by a philosophy which is symbolical rather than strictly accurate. For no trees of life or of knowledge have ever at any previous time appeared upon the earth, nor is it likely that any will appear hereafter. But I rather conceive that Moses was speaking in an allegorical spirit, intending by his paradise to intimate the domit character of the soul, which is full of innumerable opinions as this figurative paradise was of trees. And by the tree of life he was shadowing out the greatest of the virtuesùnamely, piety towards the gods, by means of which the soul is made immortal; and by the tree which had the knowledge of good an evil, he was intimating that wisdom and moderation, by means of which things, contrary in their nature to one another, are distinguished. LV.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On Rewards And Punishments, 161 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

161. and hope is joy before joy, even though it may be somewhat defective in comparison with perfect joy. But still, it is in both these respects better than that which comes after; first, because it relaxes and softens the dry rigidity of care; and secondly, because by its anticipations it gives a forewarning of the impending perfect good. XXVIII.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.71, 1.75 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.71. And it is with exceeding beauty and propriety that it is said, not that he came to the place, but that he met the place: for to come is voluntary, but to meet is very often involuntary; so that the divine Word appearing on a sudden, supplies an unexpected joy, greater than could have been hoped, inasmuch as it is about to travel in company with the solitary soul; for Moses also "brings forward the people to a meeting with God," well knowing that he comes invisibly towards those souls who have a longing to meet with him. XIII. 1.75. And it is easy otherwise by means of argument to perceive this, since God is the first light, "For the Lord is my light and my Saviour," is the language of the Psalms; and not only the light, but he is also the archetypal pattern of every other light, or rather he is more ancient and more sublime than even the archetypal model, though he is spoken of as the model; for the real model was his own most perfect word, the light, and he himself is like to no created thing.
7. Lucian, Nigrinus, 7 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. A lover, in the absence of his mistress, remembers some word, some act of hers, dwells on it, and beguiles hours of sickness with her feigned presence. Sometimes he thinks he is face to face with her; words, heard long since, come again from her lips; he rejoices; his soul cleaves to the memory of the past, and has no time for present vexations. It is so with me. Philosophy is far away, but I have heard a philosopher’s words. I piece them together, and revolve them in my heart, and am comforted. Nigrinus is the beacon fire on which, far out in mid ocean, in the darkness of night, I fix my gaze; I fancy him present with me in all my doings; I hear ever the same words. At times, in moments of concentration, I see his very face, his voice rings in my ears. of him it may truly be said, as of Pericles,In every heart he left his sting.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeschines Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
alexandria Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
aristophanes Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
belief and faith Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
boiché, a. Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
cain Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
conversion, philosophical Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
divine Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
eden Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
euripides Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
exegesis Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
exhortation, paraenesis Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
god, alone wise Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
god, worship of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
gospel/gospels Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
grace Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
greek philosophy Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
isaac Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
jacob Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
leonhardt, j. Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
logos of god Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330; Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
paideia Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
paul the apostle Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
philosopher, in progress/potential Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
philosophy, philosophical Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
pleasure' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
plutarch Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
protreptic Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
psalms Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
soul Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
therapeutae Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 150
turning/change Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330
wisdom Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 330