Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9238
Philo Of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.164-1.165


nanNow is it not fitting that even blind men should become sharpsighted in their minds to these and similar things, being endowed with the power of sight by the most sacred oracles, so as to be able to contemplate the glories of nature, and not to be limited to the mere understanding of the words? But even if we voluntarily close the eye of our soul and take no care to understand such mysteries, or if we are unable to look up to them, the hierophant himself stands by and prompts us. And do not thou ever cease through weariness to anoint thy eyes until you have introduced those who are duly initiated to the secret light of the sacred scriptures, and have displayed to them the hidden things therein contained, and their reality, which is invisible to those who are uninitiated.


nanIt is becoming then for you to act thus; but as for ye, O souls, who have once tasted of divine love, as if you had even awakened from deep sleep, dissipate the mist that is before you; and hasten forward to that beautiful spectacle, putting aside slow and hesitating fear, in order to comprehend all the beautiful sounds and sights which the president of the games has prepared for your advantage. XXVII.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

27 results
1. Cicero, On Laws, 1.8.25 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 70, 100 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

100. And the marriage in which pleasure unites people comprehends the connection of the bodies, but that which is brought about by wisdom is the union of reasonings which desire purification, and of the perfect virtues; and the two kinds of marriage here described are extremely opposite to one another;
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 28-29, 48, 27 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

27. I have also, on one occasion, heard a more ingenious train of reasoning from my own soul, which was accustomed frequently to be seized with a certain divine inspiration, even concerning matters which it could not explain even to itself; which now, if I am able to remember it accurately, I will relate. It told me that in the one living and true God there were two supreme and primary powers--goodness and authority; and that by his goodness he had created every thing, and by his authority he governed all that he had created; 27. For one may almost say that the whole infinity of numbers is measured by this one, because the boundaries which make it up are four, namely, one, two, three, and four; and an equal number of boundaries, corresponding to them in equal proportions, make up the number of a hundred out of decades; for ten, and twenty, and thirty, and forty produce a hundred. And in the same way one may produce the number of a thousand from hundreds, and that of a myriad from thousands.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 108, 107 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

107. And the expression, "Come, let us build ourselves a city and a tower, the top of which shall reach to heaven," has such a meaning as this concealed beneath it; the lawgiver does not conceive that those only are cities which are built upon the earth, the materials of which are wood and stone, but he thinks that there are other cities also which men bear about with them, being built in their souls;
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 34-38, 145 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

145. What then is there wonderful if the soul, which sees both the whole and the parts, sees them too better than they do, as if it were furnished with larger and more acute eyes? Very naturally, therefore, proper philosophy will behold intermediate instruction its handmaiden, and she that she is pregt, more than the other will see that she is. XXVI.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 81 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 82 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

82. When, therefore, Jacob, the practiser of virtue, and the man who entered into the lists of, and was a candidate for, the prizes of virtue, was inclined to give his ears in exchange for his eyes, and words for actions, and improvements for perfection, as the bounteous God was willing to give eyes to his mind, in order that he might for the future clearly see what hitherto he had only comprehended by hearing (for the eyes are more trustworthy than the ears), the oracle sounded in his ears, "Thy name shall not be called Jacob; but Israel shall thy name be, because thou hast prevailed with God and with men, with Power." Jacob then is the name of learning and or improvement, that is to say of those powers which depend upon learning, and Israel is the name of perfection, for the name being interpreted means "the sight of God;
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 54-55, 58, 53 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

53. But Moses has spoken more accurately about flights when he was establishing the law with respect to homicides, in which he goes through every species of homicide, that of intentional murder, that of unintentional slaying, that of murder by deliberate attack, or by crafty treachery. Repeat the law: "If any man strike another and he die, the striker shall die the death." And if a man do it not intentionally, but if God delivers him into his hand, then I will give thee a place to which he who has slain another shall flee. And if any one set upon his neighbour to slay him by treachery, and flee away, thou shalt drag him even from the altar to put him to Death.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 61, 31 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

31. For those souls which are devoid of flesh and of the body, remaining undisturbed in the theatre of the universe, occupied in seeing and hearing divine things, of which an insatiable desire has seized them, enjoy a pleasure to which no one offers any interruption. But those which bear the heavy burden of the flesh, being weighed down and oppressed by it, are unable to look upwards to the revolutions of the heaven, but being dragged downwards, have their necks forcibly pressed to the ground like so many quadrupeds. VIII.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Joseph, 69 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 84-86, 88, 56 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

56. but he who does this against his will is ignorant, and he who does it voluntarily is docile; on which account he is said to fall on his face, that is to say, in his outward senses, in his speech, in his mind, all but crying out loudly and shouting that the outward sense has fallen, inasmuch as it was unable, by itself, to feel as it should, if it had not been aroused by the providence of the Saviour, to take hold of the bodies which lay in its way. And speech too has fallen, being unable to give a proper explanation of anything in existence, unless he who originally made and adapted the organ of the voice, having opened its mouth and enabled its tongue to articulate, should strike it so as to produce harmonious sounds. Moreover, the king of all the mind has fallen, being deprived of its comprehension, unless the Creator of all living things were again to raise it up and re-establish it, and furnishing it with the most acutely seeing eyes, to lead it to a sight of incorporeal things. VIII.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 69, 77, 142 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

142. And we shall be only saying what is the plain truth, if we call the original founder of our race not only the first man, but also the first citizen of the world. For the world was his house and his city, while he had as yet no structure made by hands and wrought out of the materials of wood and stone. And in this world he lived as in his own country, in all safety, removed from any fear, inasmuch as he had been thought worthy of the dominion over all earthly things; and had everything that was mortal crouching before him, and taught to obey him as their master, or else constrained to do so by superior force, and living himself surrounded by all the joys which peace can bestow without a struggle and without reproach. L.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 42, 41 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

41. We must therefore be aware that each of the aforesaid names, being interpreted, has a double signification; for Enoch, being interpreted, means, as I have already said, "thy grace," and Methusaleh means, the sending forth of death. Lamech, again means, humiliation. Now the expression, "Thy grace," is by some persons referred to the mind that is in us; and by more learned and sounder interpreters it is referred to the mind of other persons.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 60 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

60. Now it is very good that these three measures should, as it were, be kneaded together in the soul, and mixed up together, in order that so the soul, being persuaded that the supreme being is God, who has raised his head above all his powers, and who is beheld independently of them, and who makes himself visible in them, may receive the characters of his power and beneficence, and becoming initiated into the perfect mysteries, may not be too ready to divulge the divine secrets to any one, but may treasure them up in herself, and keeping a check over her speech, may conceal them in silence; for the words of the scripture are, "To make secret cakes;" because the sacred and mystic statements about the one uncreated Being, and about his powers, ought to be kept secret; since it does not belong to every one to keep the deposit of divine mysteries properly. XVI.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.159-1.163, 1.165, 1.167-1.169, 1.191, 1.215-1.216, 1.228-1.229, 2.252 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.159. Therefore he who stands upon the ladder of heaven says to him who is beholding the dream, "I am the Lord God of Abraham thy father, and the God of Isaac; be not Afraid." This oracle and this vision were also the firmest support of the soul devoted to the practice of virtue, inasmuch as it taught it that the Lord and God of the universe is both these things also to his own race, being entitled both the Lord and God of all men, and of his grandfathers and ancestors, and being called by both names in order that the whole world and the man devoted to virtue might have the same inheritance; since it is also said, "The Lord himself is his Inheritance." XXVI. 1.160. But do not fancy that it is an accidental thing here for him to be called in this place the God and Lord of Abraham, but only the God of Isaac; for this latter is the symbol of the knowledge which exists by nature, which hears itself, and teaches itself, and learns of itself; but Abraham is the symbol of that which is derived from the teaching of others; and the one again is an indigenous and native inhabitant of his country, but the other is only a settler and a foreigner; 1.161. for having forsaken the language of those who indulge in sublime conversations about astronomy, a language imitating that of the Chaldaeans, foreign and barbarous, he was brought over to that which was suited to a rational being, namely, to the service of the great Cause of all things. 1.162. Now this disposition stands in need of two powers to take care of it, the power that is of authority, and that of conferring benefits, in order that in accordance with the authority of the governor, it may obey the admonitions which it receives, and also that it may be greatly benefited by his beneficence. But the other disposition stands in need of the power of beneficence only; for it has not derived any improvement from the authority which admonishes it, inasmuch as it naturally claims virtue as its own, but by reason of the bounty which is showered upon it from above, it was good and perfect from the beginning; 1.163. therefore God is the name of the beneficent power, and Lord is the title of the royal power. What then can any one call a more ancient and important good, than to be thought worthy to meet with unmixed and unalloyed beneficence? And what can be less valuable than to receive a mixture of authority and liberality? And it appears to me that it was because the practiser of virtue saw that he uttered that most admirable prayer that, "the Lord might be to him as God;" for he desired no longer to stand in awe of him as a governor, but to honour and love him as a benefactor. 1.165. It is becoming then for you to act thus; but as for ye, O souls, who have once tasted of divine love, as if you had even awakened from deep sleep, dissipate the mist that is before you; and hasten forward to that beautiful spectacle, putting aside slow and hesitating fear, in order to comprehend all the beautiful sounds and sights which the president of the games has prepared for your advantage. XXVII. 1.167. is it not then worth while to examine into the cause of this difference? Undoubtedly it is; let us then in a careful manner apply ourselves to the consideration of the cause. Philosophers say that virtue exists among men, either by nature, or by practice, or by learning. On which account the sacred scriptures represent the three founders of the nation of the Israelites as wise men; not indeed originally endowed with the same kind of wisdom, but arriving rapidly at the same end. 1.168. For the eldest of them, Abraham, had instruction for his guide in the road which conducted him to virtue; as we shall show in another treatise to the best of our power. And Isaac, who is the middle one of the three, had a self-taught and self-instructed nature. And Jacob, the third, arrived at this point by industry and practice, in accordance with which were his labours of wrestling and contention. 1.169. Since then there are thus three different manners by which wisdom exists among men, it happens that the two extremes are the most nearly and frequently united. For the virtue which is acquired by practice, is the offspring of that which is derived from learning. But that which is implanted by nature is indeed akin to the others, for it is set below them, as the root for them all. But it has obtained its prize without any rivalry or difficulty. 1.191. consider, however, what comes afterwards. The sacred word enjoins some persons what they ought to do by positive command, like a king; to others it suggests what will be for their advantage, as a preceptor does to his pupils; to others again, it is like a counsellor suggesting the wisest plans; and in this way too, it is of great advantage to those who do not of themselves know what is expedient; to others it is like a friend, in a mild and persuasive manner, bringing forward many secret things which no uninitiated person may lawfully hear. 1.215. For there are, as it seems, two temples belonging to God; one being this world, in which the high priest is the divine word, his own firstborn son. The other is the rational soul, the priest of which is the real true man, the copy of whom, perceptible to the senses, is he who performs his paternal vows and sacrifices, to whom it is enjoined to put on the aforesaid tunic, the representation of the universal heaven, in order that the world may join with the man in offering sacrifice, and that the man may likewise co-operate with the universe. 1.216. He is now therefore shown to have these two things, the speckled and the variegated character. We will now proceed to explain the third and most perfect kind, which is denominated thoroughly white. When this same high priest enters into the innermost parts of the holy temple, he is clothed in the variegated garment, and he also assumes another linen robe, made of the very finest flax. 1.228. A very glorious boast for the soul, that God should think fit to appear to and to converse with it. And do not pass by what is here said, but examine it accurately, and see whether there are really two Gods. For it is said: "I am the God who was seen by thee;" not in my place, but in the place of God, as if he meant of some other God. 1.229. What then ought we to say? There is one true God only: but they who are called Gods, by an abuse of language, are numerous; on which account the holy scripture on the present occasion indicates that it is the true God that is meant by the use of the article, the expression being, "I am the God (ho Theos);" but when the word is used incorrectly, it is put without the article, the expression being, "He who was seen by thee in the place," not of the God (tou Theou), but simply "of God" (Theou); 2.252. And again, the invisible spirit which is accustomed to converse with me in an unseen manner prompts me with a suggestion, and says, O my friend, you seem to be ignorant of an important and most desirable matter which I will explain to you completely; for I have also in a most seasonable manner explained many other things to you also.
16. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.34, 2.45, 2.166 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.34. He, therefore, who comes into that which is truly the greatest of cities, namely, this world, and who beholds all the land, both the mountain and the champaign district full of animals, and plants, and the streams of rivers, both overflowing and depending on the wintry floods, and the steady flow of the sea, and the admirable temperature of the air, and the varieties and regular revolutions of the seasons of the year; and then too the sun and moon, the rulers of day and night, and the revolutions and regular motions of all the other planets and fixed stars, and of the whole heaven; would he not naturally, or I should rather say, of necessity, conceive a notion of the Father, and creator, and governor of all this system; 2.45. admiring, as it were, a life of peace and tranquillity, being the most devoted contemplators of nature and of all the things in it. Investigating earth and sea, and the air, and the heaven, and all the different natures in each of them; dwelling, if one may so say, in their minds, at least, with the moon, and the sun, and the whole company of the rest of the stars, both planets and fixed stars. Having their bodies, indeed, firmly planted on the earth, but having their souls furnished with wings, in order that thus hovering in the air they may closely survey all the powers above, looking upon them as in reality the most excellent of cosmopolites, who consider the whole world as their native city, and all the devotees of wisdom as their fellow citizens, virtue herself having enrolled them as such, to whom it has been entrusted to frame a constitution for their common city.XIII. 2.166. Since they slipped in the most essential matter, the nation of the Jews--to speak most accurately--set aright the false step of others by having looked beyond everything which has come into existence through creation since it is generate and corruptible in nature, and chose only the service of the ungenerate and eternal. The first reason for this is because it is excellent; the second is because it is profitable to be dedicated and associated with the Older rather than those who are younger and with the Ruler rather than those who are ruled and with the Maker rather those things which come into existence.
17. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 178, 11 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

11. but since no perfect antidote or remedy can be found for the mutilation of the outward senses, by which thousands and thousands of persons have died prematurely while still living, prudence, that best of all qualities within us, sets itself against it to prevent it, implanting eyes in our intellect, which, by reason of its sagacious capacity, are altogether and entirely superior in acuteness of vision to the eyes of the body:
18. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 25 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

25. And in every house there is a sacred shrine which is called the holy place, and the monastery in which they retire by themselves and perform all the mysteries of a holy life, bringing in nothing, neither meat, nor drink, nor anything else which is indispensable towards supplying the necessities of the body, but studying in that place the laws and the sacred oracles of God enunciated by the holy prophets, and hymns, and psalms, and all kinds of other things by reason of which knowledge and piety are increased and brought to perfection.
19. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 2.71 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.71. And while he was still abiding in the mountain he was initiated in the sacred will of God, being instructed in all the most important matters which relate to his priesthood, those which come first in order being the commands of God respecting the building of a temple and all its furniture.
20. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.57, 3.3, 3.219 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Exodus, 2.42 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

22. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 4.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

23. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. When therefore is it proper for the servant of God to use freedom of speech to the ruler and master of himself, and of the whole word? Is it not when he is free from all sins, and is aware in his conscience that he loves his master, feeling more joy at the fact of being a servant of God, than he would if he were sovereign over the whole race of mankind, and were invested without any effort on his part with the supreme authority over land and sea.
24. Philo of Alexandria, That God Is Unchangeable, 61 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

61. My good men! A man who would establish the most excellent system of laws, ought to keep one end constantly in view, namely, to do good to all who come within his reach." Those, therefore, who have received a fortunate disposition, and an education in all respects blameless, finding the path of life which proceeds in this direction plain and straight, take truth with them as the companion of their journey; by which they are initiated in the true mysteries relating to the living God, and therefore they never attribute any of the properties of created beings to him.
25. Plutarch, On The Sign of Socrates, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Plutarch, How A Man May Become Aware of His Progress In Virtue, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

27. Anon., Genesis Rabba, 12.6, 41.3 (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

12.6. תּוֹלְדוֹת אָמַר רַבִּי שְׁמוּאֵל בַּר נַחְמָן כָּל תּוֹלְדוֹת שֶׁנֶּאֶמְרוּ בַּתּוֹרָה חֲסֵרִין בַּר מִן תְּרֵין (רות ד, יח): וְאֵלֶּה תּוֹלְדוֹת פָּרֶץ וגו' וְהָדֵין. וּמִפְּנֵי מָה אִינוּן חֲסֵרִין, רַבִּי יוּדָן בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי אָבִין אָמַר כְּנֶגֶד שִׁשָּׁה דְבָרִים שֶׁנִּטְּלוּ מֵאָדָם הָרִאשׁוֹן, וְאֵלּוּ הֵן: זִיווֹ, חַיָּיו, וְקוֹמָתוֹ, וּפְרִי הָאָרֶץ, וּפֵרוֹת הָאִילָן, וּמְאוֹרוֹת. זִיווֹ מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (איוב יד, כ): מְשַׁנֶּה פָנָיו וַתְּשַׁלְּחֵהוּ. חַיָּיו מִנַּיִן (בראשית ג, יט): כִּי עָפָר אַתָּה. קוֹמָתוֹ מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (בראשית ג, ח): וַיִּתְחַבֵּא הָאָדָם וְאִשְׁתּוֹ. אָמַר רַבִּי אַבָּהוּ בְּאוֹתָהּ הַשָּׁעָה גֻּזְעָה קוֹמָתוֹ שֶׁל אָדָם הָרִאשׁוֹן וְנַעֲשֵׂית שֶׁל מֵאָה אַמָּה. פְּרִי הָאִילָן וּפְרִי הָאָרֶץ מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (בראשית ג, יז): אֲרוּרָה הָאֲדָמָה בַּעֲבוּרֶךָ. מְאוֹרוֹת, רַבִּי שִׁמְעוֹן בֶּן רַבִּי יְהוּדָה אִישׁ כְּפַר עַכּוֹ אָמַר מִשֵּׁם רַבִּי מֵאִיר, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁנִּתְקַלְּלוּ הַמְאוֹרוֹת מֵעֶרֶב שַׁבָּת, לֹא לָקוּ עַד מוֹצָאֵי שַׁבָּת. אַתְיָא כְּרַבָּנָן וְלָא אַתְיָא כְּרַבִּי יוֹסֵי, דְּאָמַר רַבִּי יוֹסֵי אָדָם הָרִאשׁוֹן לֹא לָן כְּבוֹדוֹ עִמּוֹ, מַאי טַעְמֵיהּ (תהלים מט, יג): אָדָם בִּיקָר בַּל יָלִין וגו'. וְרַבָּנָן אָמְרֵי בְּמוֹצָאֵי שַׁבָּת נִטַּל זִיווֹ מִמֶּנּוּ וּטְרָדוֹ מִגַּן עֵדֶן, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (בראשית ג, כד): וַיְגָרֶשׁ אֶת הָאָדָם, וּכְתִיב (איוב יד, כ): מְשַׁנֶּה פָנָיו וַתְּשַׁלְּחֵהוּ, אָמַר רַבִּי יְהוּדָה בַּר סִימוֹן, אוֹתָהּ הָאוֹרָה שֶׁנִּבְרָא בָּהּ הָעוֹלָם, אָדָם הָרִאשׁוֹן עָמַד וְהִבִּיט בָּהּ מִסּוֹף הָעוֹלָם וְעַד סוֹפוֹ, כֵּיוָן שֶׁרָאָה הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא מַעֲשֵׂה דּוֹר אֱנוֹשׁ וּמַעֲשֵׂה דּוֹר הַמַּבּוּל וּמַעֲשֵׂה דּוֹר הַפְלָגָה שֶׁהֵן מְקוּלְקָלִים, עָמַד וּגְנָזוֹ מֵהֶם, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (איוב לח, טו): וְיִמָּנַע מֵרְשָׁעִים אוֹרָם. וְלָמָּה גְּנָזוֹ, אֶלָּא גְּנָזוֹ לַצַּדִּיקִים לֶעָתִיד לָבוֹא, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (בראשית א, ד): וַיַּרְא אֱלֹהִים אֶת הָאוֹר כִּי טוֹב, וְאֵין טוֹב אֶלָּא צַדִּיקִים, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (ישעיה ג, י): אִמְרוּ צַדִּיק כִּי טוֹב. וּמִנַּיִן שֶׁגְּנָזוֹ לַצַּדִּיקִים, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (משלי ד, יח): וְאֹרַח צַדִּיקִים כְּאוֹר נֹגַהּ. וְכֵיוָן שֶׁרָאָה אוֹר שֶׁהוּא גָּנוּז לַצַּדִּיקִים שָׂמַח, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (משלי יג, ט): וְאוֹר צַדִּיקִים יִשְׂמָח. רַבִּי לֵוִי בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי גְּזֵירָא אָמַר, שְׁלשִׁים וְשֵׁשׁ שָׁעוֹת שִׁמְשָׁה אוֹתָהּ הָאוֹרָה, שְׁתֵּים עֶשְׂרֵה שֶׁל עֶרֶב שַׁבָּת, וּשְׁתֵּים עֶשְׂרֵה שֶׁל לֵיל שַׁבָּת, וּשְׁתֵּים עֶשְׂרֵה שֶׁל שַׁבָּת. כֵּיוָן שֶׁחָטָא אָדָם הָרִאשׁוֹן בִּקֵּשׁ לְגָנְזָהּ, חָלַק כָּבוֹד לַשַׁבָּת, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (בראשית ב, ג): וַיְבָרֶךְ אֱלֹהִים אֶת יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי, וּבַמֶּה בֵּרְכוֹ, בָּאוֹר, כֵּיוָן שֶׁשָּׁקְעָה הַחַמָּה בְּלֵילֵי שַׁבָּת שִׁמְשָׁה הָאוֹרָה, הִתְחִילוּ הַכֹּל מְקַלְּסִין לְהַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (איוב לז, ג): תַּחַת כָּל הַשָּׁמַיִם יִשְׁרֵהוּ, מִפְּנֵי מָה, (איוב לז, ג): וְאוֹרוֹ עַל כַּנְפוֹת הָאָרֶץ. הֵאִירָה אוֹתָהּ הָאוֹרָה כָּל הַיּוֹם וְכָל הַלַּיְלָה. כֵּיוָן שֶׁשָּׁקְעָה חַמָּה בְּמוֹצָאֵי שַׁבָּת הִתְחִיל הַחשֶׁךְ מְמַשְׁמֶשֶׁת וּבָא, בְּאוֹתָהּ שָׁעָה נִתְיָרֵא אָדָם הָרִאשׁוֹן, אָמַר שֶׁמָּא אוֹתוֹ שֶׁכָּתוּב בּוֹ (בראשית ג, טו): הוּא יְשׁוּפְךָ רֹאשׁ וְאַתָּה תְּשׁוּפֶנּוּ עָקֵב, בָּא לְהִזְדַּוֵּוג לִי, (תהלים קלט, יא): וָאֹמַר אַךְ חשֶׁךְ יְשׁוּפֵנִי, אֶתְמְהָא. מֶה עָשָׂה לוֹ הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא זִמֵּן לוֹ שְׁנֵי רְעָפִים וְהִקִּישָׁן זֶה לָזֶה וְיָצָאת הָאוֹר וּבֵרַךְ עָלֶיהָ, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (תהלים קלט, יא): וְלַיְלָה אוֹר בַּעֲדֵנִי, אַתְיָא כְּהַהִיא דְּתָנֵי דְּבֵי רַבִּי יִשְׁמָעֵאל מִפְּנֵי מָה מְבָרְכִין עַל הָאוֹר בְּמוֹצָאֵי שַׁבָּת בּוֹרֵא מְאוֹרֵי הָאֵשׁ, מִפְּנֵי שֶׁהוּא תְּחִלַּת בְּרִיָּתוֹ, רַב הוּנָא בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי אַיְּבוּ בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי יוֹחָנָן אָמַר, אַף בְּמוֹצָאֵי יוֹם הַכִּפּוּרִים מְבָרְכִין עָלָיו, מִפְּנֵי שֶׁשָּׁבַת בְּאוֹתוֹ הַיּוֹם. רַבִּי בֶּרֶכְיָה בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי שְׁמוּאֵל אָמַר, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁנִּבְרְאוּ הַדְּבָרִים עַל מְלֵיאָתָן, כֵּיוָן שֶׁחָטָא אָדָם הָרִאשׁוֹן נִתְקַלְקְלוּ, וְעוֹד אֵינָן חוֹזְרִין לְתִקּוּנָן עַד שֶׁיָּבֹא בֶּן פֶּרֶץ, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (רות ד, יח): וְאֵלֶּה תּוֹלְדוֹת פֶּרֶץ, מָלֵא, בִּשְׁבִיל שִׁשָּׁה דְבָרִים שֶׁיַּחְזְרוּ, וְאֵלּוּ הֵן: זִיווֹ, חַיָּיו, קוֹמָתוֹ, פֵּרוֹת הָאָרֶץ, וּפֵרוֹת הָאִילָן, וּמְאוֹרוֹת. זִיווֹ מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (שופטים ה, לא): וְאֹהֲבָיו כְּצֵאת הַשֶּׁמֶשׁ בִּגְבֻרָתוֹ. חַיָּיו מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (ישעיה סה, כב): כִּי כִּימֵי הָעֵץ יְמֵי עַמִּי וגו', תָּנֵי רַבִּי שִׁמְעוֹן בֶּן יוֹחָאי אוֹמֵר אֵין עֵץ אֶלָּא תּוֹרָה, הֵיךְ מָה דְאַתְּ אָמַר (משלי ג, יח): עֵץ חַיִּים הִיא לַמַּחֲזִיקִים בָּהּ. קוֹמָתוֹ מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (ויקרא כו, יג): וָאוֹלֵךְ אֶתְכֶם קוֹמְמִיּוּת. תָּנֵי רַבִּי חִיָּא בְּקוֹמָה זְקוּפָה וְלֹא יְרֵאִים מִכָּל בְּרִיָּה. רַבִּי יוּדָן אוֹמֵר מֵאָה אַמָּה כְּאָדָם הָרִאשׁוֹן. רַבִּי שִׁמְעוֹן אָמַר מָאתַיִם אַמָּה. רַבִּי אֶלְעָזָר בַּר רַבִּי שִׁמְעוֹן אָמַר שְׁלשׁ מֵאוֹת, קוֹמְמָאָה, מִיּוּת מָאתַיִם. רַבִּי אַבָּהוּ אָמַר תְּשַׁע מֵאוֹת אַמָּה. רַבִּי בֶּרֶכְיָה בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי דוֹסָא אָמַר טַעְמֵיהּ דְּרַבִּי אַבָּהוּ מֵהָכָא: כִּי כִּימֵי הָעֵץ יְמֵי עַמִּי, כַּשִּׁקְמָה הַזּוֹ שֶׁהִיא עוֹשָׂה בָּאָרֶץ שֵׁשׁ מֵאוֹת שָׁנָה, וְהַוְּלַד יוֹצֵא מִמְּעֵי אִמּוֹ בְּאַמָּה גְדוּמָה, צֵא וַחֲשֹׁב אַמָּה וּמֶחֱצָה בְּכָל שָׁנָה, הֲרֵי תְּשַׁע מֵאוֹת אַמָּה. פֵּרוֹת הָאָרֶץ וּפֵרוֹת הָאִילָן מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (זכריה ח, יב): כִּי זֶרַע הַשָּׁלוֹם הַגֶּפֶן תִּתֵּן פִּרְיָהּ וגו'. מְאוֹרוֹת מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (ישעיה ל, כו): וְהָיָה אוֹר הַלְּבָנָה כְּאוֹר הַחַמָּה וגו'. 41.3. וְאַבְרָם כָּבֵד מְאֹד בַמִּקְנֶה בַּכֶּסֶף וּבַזָּהָב (בראשית יג, ב), הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (תהלים קה, לז): וַיּוֹצִיאֵם בְּכֶסֶף וְזָהָב וגו'. (בראשית יג, ג): וַיֵּלֶךְ לְמַסָּעָיו, בַּמַּסָּעוֹת שֶׁהָלַךְ, בָּהֶן חָזַר. אָמַר רַבִּי אֶלְעָזָר בְּרַבִּי מְנַחֵם הָלַךְ לִפְרֹעַ הַקָּפוֹתָיו. (בראשית יג, ה): וְגַם לְלוֹט הַהֹלֵךְ אֶת אַבְרָם וגו', אַרְבָּעָה דְּבָרִים טוֹבִים הָיוּ לְלוֹט בַּעֲבוּר אַבְרָם, (בראשית יב, ד): וַיֵּלֶךְ אַבְרָם וגו' וַיֵּלֶךְ אִתּוֹ לוֹט. וְגַם לְלוֹט הַהֹלֵךְ אֶת אַבְרָם. (בראשית יד, טז): וַיָּשֶׁב אֶת כָּל הָרְכֻשׁ וְגַם אֶת לוֹט. (בראשית יט, כט): וַיְהִי בְּשַׁחֵת אֱלֹהִים וגו' וַיִּזְכֹּר אֱלֹהִים אֶת אַבְרָהָם וַיְשַׁלַּח אֶת לוֹט מִתּוֹךְ וגו'. וּכְנֶגְדָּן הָיוּ בָנָיו צְרִיכִים לִפְרֹעַ לָנוּ טוֹבוֹת, לֹא דַּיָּן שֶׁלֹא פָּרְעוּ לָנוּ טוֹבוֹת אֶלָּא רָעוֹת, הֲדָא הוּא דִכְתִיב (במדבר כב, ה ו): וַיִּשְׁלַח מַלְאָכִים אֶל בִּלְעָם בֶּן בְּעוֹר וגו' וְעַתָּה לְכָה נָא אָרָה לִי אֶת הָעָם. (שופטים ג, יג): וַיֶּאֱסֹף אֵלָיו אֶת בְּנֵי עַמּוֹן וַעֲמָלֵק וַיֵּלֶךְ וַיַּךְ אֶת יִשְׂרָאֵל וַיִּירְשׁוּ אֶת עִיר הַתְּמָרִים. (דברי הימים ב כ, א): וַיְהִי אַחֲרֵי כֵן בָּאוּ בְנֵי מוֹאָב וּבְנֵי מִדְיָן [ועמון] וְעִמָּהֶם מִן הָעַמּוֹנִים עַל יְהוֹשָׁפָט. וְעוֹד כְּתִיב (איכה א, י): יָדוֹ פָּרַשׂ צָר עַל כָּל מַחֲמַדֶּיהָ. וְנִכְתַּב חֵטְא שֶׁלָּהֶם בְּאַרְבָּעָה מְקוֹמוֹת, (דברים כג, ד ה): לֹא יָבֹא עַמּוֹנִי וּמוֹאָבִי, עַל דְּבַר אֲשֶׁר לֹא קִדְּמוּ אֶתְכֶם בַּלֶּחֶם וּבַמַּיִם, וּכְתִיב (מיכה ו, ה): עַמִּי זְכָר נָא מַה יָּעַץ בָּלָק מֶלֶךְ מוֹאָב וּמֶה עָנָה וגו'. (נחמיה יג, ב): כִּי לֹא קִדְּמוּ אֶת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל בַּלֶּחֶם וּבַמָּיִם וַיִּשְׂכֹּר עָלָיו אֶת בִּלְעָם לְקַלְלוֹ (יהושע כד, ט): וַיִּקְרָא לְבִלְעָם בֶּן בְּעוֹר לְקַלֵּל אֶתְכֶם. עָמְדוּ אַרְבָּעָה נְבִיאִים וְחָתְמוּ גְּזַר דִּינָם, אֵלּוּ הֵם: יְשַׁעְיָה וְיִרְמְיָה צְפַנְיָה וִיחֶזְקֵאל. יְשַׁעְיָה אָמַר (ישעיה טו, א): מַשָֹּׂא מוֹאָב כִּי בְּלֵיל שֻׁדַּד עָר מוֹאָב נִדְמָה כִּי בְּלֵיל שֻׁדַּד קִיר מוֹאָב נִדְמָה. יִרְמְיָה אָמַר (ירמיה מט, ב): לָכֵן הִנֵּה יָמִים בָּאִים נְאֻם ה' וְהִשְׁמַעְתִּי אֶל רַבַּת בְּנֵי עַמּוֹן תְּרוּעַת מִלְחָמָה וְהָיְתָה לְתֵל שְׁמָמָה וּבְנֹתֶיהָ בָּאֵשׁ תִּצַּתְנָה וְיָרַשׁ יִשְׂרָאֵל אֶת יֹרְשָׁיו אָמַר ה'. יְחֶזְקֵאל אָמַר (יחזקאל כה, י יא): לִבְנֵי קֶדֶם עַל בְּנֵי עַמּוֹן וּנְתַתִּיהָ לְמוֹרָשָׁה לְמַעַן לֹא תִזָּכֵר בְּנֵי עַמּוֹן בַּגּוֹיִם, וּבְמוֹאָב אֶעֱשֶׂה שְׁפָטִים וְיָדְעוּ כִּי אֲנִי ה': צְפַנְיָה אָמַר (צפניה ב, ט): לָכֵן חַי אָנִי נְאֻם ה' צְבָאוֹת אֱלֹהֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל כִּי מוֹאָב כִּסְדֹם תִּהְיֶה וּבְנֵי עַמּוֹן כַּעֲמֹרָה וגו'. 12.6. ... seven things were taken away from Adam Harishon after he ate from the tree of knowing, including among them] his brilliance, his life, and his stature / zivo v’chayyav v’qomato..." 41.3. ... R’ Shimon bar Aba said in the name of R’ Yocha: any where that it says ‘and it was’ (vayehi) it indicates distress and joy. If it is distress there is no distress like it and if it is joy there is no joy like it. R’ Shmuel ben Nachmani came and split the teaching in half. Anywhere that it says ‘and it was’ (vayehi) indicates distress, ‘and it will be’ (v’haya) indicates joy…The brought a challenge from this verse “…and he was [there] (v’haya) when Jerusalem was taken.” (Jeremiah 38:28) He said to them: this is still a cause of joy because on that very day Israel received full payment for their sins. As R’ Shmuel ben Nachmani said: Israel received full payment for their sins on the day the Holy Temple was destroyed, as it says “Your iniquity is finished, O daughter of Zion…” (Lamentations 4:22)"


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133; Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
adam. man, first Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
adam. man, primordial Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
anointing Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
antiochus of ascalon Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
asceticism Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
baptism Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
belief and faith Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
clement of alexandria Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 123; Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
collocutions Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
contemplation Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
conversion, philosophical Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
conversion, ritual Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
creation, new Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
cyril of alexandria Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 123
de abrahamo, inconsistencies in Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
delphi Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
democracy Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
descending Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
dreams Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
education/educational Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
embodied Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
festugière, a. j. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
gnosticism, myth in Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
god, prompting of Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
goodenough, e. r. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
hypostasis, primordial man as Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
illumination Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
image of god Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
inspiration Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
jew/jewish, literature/ authors Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
knowledge of god/truth Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
law, god's" '151.0_192.0@mystery Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
law of nature, mosaic laws consonant with Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
law of nature Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
learning and teaching, abraham associated with Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
light Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
lilia, salvatore r. c. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
literature Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
logos of god, earthly and heavenly Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
logos of god, primordial Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
logos of god Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
migrations of abraham, literal and ethical interpretations of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
migrations of abraham Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
mosaic law, law of nature and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
mysteries Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133; Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
mystery language Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
nag hammadi Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
natural' Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
nature, gods commands evident in Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
nature, living in accordance with Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
nikiprowetzky, v. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
nock, a. d. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
ophites Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
oracles Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
passions Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
paul the apostle Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
philo judaeus Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
philosopher, in progress/potential Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
philosophy, philosophical Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
piety of abraham, proofs of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
plato Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
plotinus Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
prayer Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
proofs Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
proselytes Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
providence Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
prudence Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
rational Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
reason Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
religion, religious Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
repentance Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
resurrection Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
riedweg, christoph Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
roman imperial period Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
salvation Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
samaritan literature Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
sarah Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
second god Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
sheppard, a. d. r. Sly, Philo's Perception of Women (1990) 133
sibyl Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
sight, god as object of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
soul Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
spirit, characterizations as, breath (life itself) Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, characterizations as, customary friend Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, characterizations as, teacher Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, characterizations as, voice Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, effects of, ecstasy/frenzy Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, effects of, interpret dreams/scripture Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, modes of presence, guiding Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, modes of presence, indwelling Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, modes of presence, possessing Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, modes of presence, prompting Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit, modes of presence, receiving of Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 192
spirit/spiritual Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
tamar Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 369
the cosmos, and the law Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
the cosmos Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210
truth Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
turning/change Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
two powers in heaven Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 257
works Despotis and Lohr, Religious and Philosophical Conversion in the Ancient Mediterranean Traditions (2022) 335
ἀναδιδάσκω Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 210