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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9247
Philo Of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.92
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

18 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 1.4, 21.2-21.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.4. וַיַּרְא אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאוֹר כִּי־טוֹב וַיַּבְדֵּל אֱלֹהִים בֵּין הָאוֹר וּבֵין הַחֹשֶׁךְ׃ 21.2. וַיְהִי אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הַנַּעַר וַיִּגְדָּל וַיֵּשֶׁב בַּמִּדְבָּר וַיְהִי רֹבֶה קַשָּׁת׃ 21.2. וַתַּהַר וַתֵּלֶד שָׂרָה לְאַבְרָהָם בֵּן לִזְקֻנָיו לַמּוֹעֵד אֲשֶׁר־דִּבֶּר אֹתוֹ אֱלֹהִים׃ 21.3. וַיֹּאמֶר כִּי אֶת־שֶׁבַע כְּבָשֹׂת תִּקַּח מִיָּדִי בַּעֲבוּר תִּהְיֶה־לִּי לְעֵדָה כִּי חָפַרְתִּי אֶת־הַבְּאֵר הַזֹּאת׃ 21.3. וַיִּקְרָא אַבְרָהָם אֶת־שֶׁם־בְּנוֹ הַנּוֹלַד־לוֹ אֲשֶׁר־יָלְדָה־לּוֹ שָׂרָה יִצְחָק׃ 1.4. And God saw the light, that it was good; and God divided the light from the darkness." 21.2. And Sarah conceived, and bore Abraham a son in his old age, at the set time of which God had spoken to him." 21.3. And Abraham called the name of his son that was born unto him, whom Sarah bore to him, Isaac."
2. Hebrew Bible, Numbers, 27.1-27.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

27.1. וְאִם־אֵין לוֹ אַחִים וּנְתַתֶּם אֶת־נַחֲלָתוֹ לַאֲחֵי אָבִיו׃ 27.1. וַתִּקְרַבְנָה בְּנוֹת צְלָפְחָד בֶּן־חֵפֶר בֶּן־גִּלְעָד בֶּן־מָכִיר בֶּן־מְנַשֶּׁה לְמִשְׁפְּחֹת מְנַשֶּׁה בֶן־יוֹסֵף וְאֵלֶּה שְׁמוֹת בְּנֹתָיו מַחְלָה נֹעָה וְחָגְלָה וּמִלְכָּה וְתִרְצָה׃ 27.2. וְנָתַתָּה מֵהוֹדְךָ עָלָיו לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ כָּל־עֲדַת בְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ 27.2. וַתַּעֲמֹדְנָה לִפְנֵי מֹשֶׁה וְלִפְנֵי אֶלְעָזָר הַכֹּהֵן וְלִפְנֵי הַנְּשִׂיאִם וְכָל־הָעֵדָה פֶּתַח אֹהֶל־מוֹעֵד לֵאמֹר׃ 27.3. אָבִינוּ מֵת בַּמִּדְבָּר וְהוּא לֹא־הָיָה בְּתוֹךְ הָעֵדָה הַנּוֹעָדִים עַל־יְהוָה בַּעֲדַת־קֹרַח כִּי־בְחֶטְאוֹ מֵת וּבָנִים לֹא־הָיוּ לוֹ׃ 27.1. Then drew near the daughters of Zelophehad, the son of Hepher, the son of Gilead, the son of Machir, the son of Manasseh, of the families of Manasseh the son of Joseph; and these are the names of his daughters: Mahlah, Noah, and Hoglah, and Milcah, and Tirzah." 27.2. And they stood before Moses, and before Eleazar the priest, and before the princes and all the congregation, at the door of the tent of meeting, saying:" 27.3. ’Our father died in the wilderness, and he was not among the company of them that gathered themselves together against the LORD in the company of Korah, but he died in his own sin; and he had no sons."
3. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

245c. is given by the gods for our greatest happiness; and our proof will not be believed by the merely clever, but will be accepted by the truly wise. First, then, we must learn the truth about the soul divine and human by observing how it acts and is acted upon. And the beginning of our proof is as follows: Every soul is immortal. For that which is ever moving is immortal but that which moves something else or is moved by something else, when it ceases to move, ceases to live. Only that which moves itself, since it does not leave itself, never ceases to move, and this is also
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 26 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

26. But we must not be ignorant that repentance occupies the second place only, next after perfection, just as the change from sickness to convalescence is inferior to perfect uninterrupted health. Therefore, that which is continuous and perfect in virtues is very near divine power, but that condition which is improvement advancing in process of time is the peculiar blessing of a welldisposed soul, which does not continue in its childish pursuits, but by more vigorous thoughts and inclinations, such as really become a man, seeks a tranquil steadiness of soul, and which attains to it by its conception of what is good. V.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 40-43, 39 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

39. Now recollection only comes in the second rank after memory, as inferior to it; and he who recollects is inferior to him who remembers; for the latter resembles a man in an uninterrupted state of good health, but the other is like a man recovering from a disease, for forgetfulness is a disease of the memory;
6. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 81-87, 80 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

80. Let us now, therefore, proceeding in regular order, speak of the enemies of these persons, men who honour instruction and right reason, among whom are those who are attached to the virtue of one of their parents, being half-perfect companions; these men are the most excellent guardians of the laws which the father, that is to say, right reason, established, and faithful stewards of the customs which education, their mother, instituted;
7. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 157 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

157. Also the person who loves virtue seeks a goat by reason of his sins, but does not find one; for, already, as the sacred scripture tells us, "it has been Burnt." Now we must consider what is intimated under this figurative expression--how never to do any thing wrong is the peculiar attribute of God; and to repent is the part of a wise man. But this is very difficult and very hard to attain to.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 199-207, 76-81, 198 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 53 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

53. The aforesaid number therefore being accounted worthy of such pre-eminence in nature, the Creator of necessity adorned the heaven by the number four, namely by that most beautiful and most godlike ornament the lightgiving stars. And knowing that of all existing things light is the most excellent, he made it the instrument of the best of all the senses, sight. For what the mind is in the soul, that the eye is in the body. For each of them sees, the one beholding those existing things which are perceptible only to the intellect, and the other those which are perceptible to the external senses. But the mind is in need of knowledge in order to distinguish incorporeal things, and the eyes have need of light in order to be able to perceive bodies, and light is also the cause of many other good things to men, and particularly of the greatest, namely philosophy.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Therefore punishment which is the chastiser of impious men, will await Cain who has now departed from before the face of God, but Moses will suggest to those who know God, a most excellent suggestion, to love God and to obey him, and cleave to him, for he tells men that this is the life which in truth is tranquil and lasting, and he very emphatically invites us to the honour of the one being who is above all others to be beloved and honoured, bidding us cleave to him, recommending to us a continual and constant and inseparable harmony and union of friendship with him.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 127 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

127. In this way he also says, "The cities of the Levites are ransomed for ever, because the minister of God enjoys eternal freedom, according to the continuous revolutions of the ever-moving soul," and he admits incessant healing applications; for when he calls them ransomed, not once, but for ever, as he says, he means to convey such a meaning as this, that they are always in a state of revolution, and always in a state of freedom, the state of revolution being implanted in them because of their natural mortality, but their freedom coming to them because of their ministration to God. XXXVIII.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On Sobriety, 66, 65 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 2.34-2.35, 2.44-2.45 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.34. Simeon is an emblem of learning, for his name being interpreted means, "listening." Levi is a symbol of virtuous energies and actions, and of holy ministrations. Judas is an emblem of songs and hymns addressed to God. Issachar, of wages which are given for good work; but perhaps the works themselves are their own perfect reward. Zabulon is a symbol of light, since his name means the departure of night; and when the night departs and leaves us, then of necessity light arises. 2.35. Dan is a symbol of the distinction between, and division of, different things. Gad is an emblem of the invasion of pirates, and of a counter attack made upon them. Asser is a symbol of natural wealth, for his name being interpreted, signifies "a calling blessed," since wealth is accounted a blessed possession. 2.44. After that he puts on a golden necklace, a most illustrious halter, the circlet and wheel of interminable necessity, not the consequence and regular order of things in life, nor the connection of the affairs of nature as Thamar was; for her ornament was not a necklace, but an armlet. Moreover, he assumes a ring, a royal gift which is no gift, a pledge devoid of good faith, the very contrary gift to that which was given to the same Thamar by Judah the son of the seeing king, Israel; 2.45. for God gives to the soul a seal, a very beautiful gift, to show that he has invested with shape the essence of all things which was previously devoid of shape, and has stamped with a particular character that which previously had no character, and has endowed with form that which had previously no distinctive form, and having perfected the entire world, he has impressed upon it an image and appearance, namely, his own word.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.103, 1.339 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.103. For it would be mere folly that some men should be excluded from the priesthood by reason of the scars which exist on their bodies from ancient wounds, which are the emblem of misfortune indeed, but not of wickedness; but that those persons who, not at all out of necessity but from their own deliberate choice, have made a market of their beauty, when at last they slowly repent, should at once after leaving their lovers become united to priests, and should come from brothels and be admitted into the sacred precincts. For the scars and impressions of their old offences remain not the less in the souls of those who repent. 1.339. Again, of the more philosophical of the outward senses by means of which the living well is produced, the power of sight beholds the light which is the most beautiful of all essences, and by means of the light it beholds all other things, the sun, the moon, the stars, the heaven, the earth, the sea, the innumerable varieties of plants and animals, and in short all bodies, and shapes, and odours, and magnitudes whatever, the sight of which has given birth to excessive wisdom, and has begotten a great desire for knowledge.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.124, 2.148, 2.155-2.158, 2.192 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.124. And at this time they say that some persons threw themselves on their beds, and did not venture to rise up, and that some, when any of the necessities of nature overtook them, could only move with difficulty by feeling their way along the walls or whatever else they could lay hold of, like so many blind men; for even the light of the fire lit for necessary uses was either extinguished by the violence of the storm, or else it was made invisible and overwhelmed by the density of the darkness, so that that most indispensable of all the external senses, namely, sight, though unimpaired, was deprived of its office, not being able to discern any thing, and all the other senses were overthrown like subjects, the leader having fallen down. 2.148. And of the rams, one he required for a whole burnt-offering of gratitude for the successful arrangement of all those things, of which every individual has such a share as is suited to him, deriving benefit from all the elements, enjoying the earth for his abode and in respect of the nourishment which is derived from it; the water for drinking, and washing, and sailing on; the air for breathing and for the comprehension of those things which are the objects of our outward senses (since the air is the medium in which they all are exerted 2.155. For it was natural that an especial honour should be assigned to the holy place, not only by means of those things in which men are the workmen employed, but also by that purest of all essences, fire, in order that the ordinary fire which is used by men might not touch the altar; perhaps by reason of its being defiled by ten thousand impurities. 2.156. For it is concerned not only with irrational animals when they are roasted or boiled for the unjust appeasing of our miserable bellies, but also in the case of men who are slain by hostile attack, not merely in a small body of three or four, but in numerous hosts. 2.157. At all events, before now, arrows charged with fire have been aimed at vast naval fleets and have burnt them; and fire has destroyed whole cities, which have blazed away till they have been consumed down to their very foundations and reduced to ashes, so that no trace whatever has remained of their former situation. 2.158. It appears to me that this was the reason for which God rejected from his sacred altar the fire which is applied to common uses, as being defiled; and that, instead of it, he rained down celestial flame from heaven, in order to make a distinction between holy and profane things, and to separate the things belonging to man from the things belonging to God; for it was fitting that a more incorruptible essence of fire than that which served the common purposes of life should be set apart for sacrifices. 2.192. And we must here begin with the promise. There are four places where the oracles are given by way of question and answer, being contained in the exposition of the law, and having a mixed character. For, first, the prophet feels inspiration and asks questions, and then the father prophesies to him, giving him a share of his discourse and replies. And the first case where this occurs is one which would have irritated, not only Moses, who was the most holy and pious man that ever lived, but even any one who had only had a slight taste of piety.
16. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.91, 3.93-3.94, 3.234 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 2.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.120, 1.504



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aaron Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290
abram/abraham, hope of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290, 315, 418
allegory/allegoresis Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290
aporiae Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418
arithmology, five Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 315
collocutions Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
creation, of light Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
disease/illness Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 365
encomia, on eyes and sight Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
ephraim Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314, 315
esau Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314, 315
exposition of the law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290, 418
eyes, as windows of the soul Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
eyes, encomium on Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
eyes, light and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
forgetfulness Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 365
hagar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314, 315
hope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314
ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 315
israel, seer of god Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290
israel Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290, 314, 315
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418
laughter Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418
light, creation of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
light, sight and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
light, types of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
logos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418
manasseh Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314, 315
medical imagery Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 365
memory Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314, 315
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290, 314, 315
perfection Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418
pharaoh Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290
physiognomy Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314, 418
preliminary studies Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 315
pythagoreans Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 365
qge Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 290
remembrance Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 365
repentance Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 365
reuben Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314, 315
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314, 315
sennaar, as passive Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
sight, as active Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
sight Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
simeon Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 314, 315
sodom, allegorical interpretation of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
sodom, sodomite cities, destruction of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
sodom, the five senses and Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
soul, constant activity of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
soul, rational and irrational' Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418
soul reflected by Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 418; Wilson, Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2010) 365
zeno Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296
βίος Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 296