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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9247
Philo Of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.155
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 39.1 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

39.1. וְיוֹסֵף הוּרַד מִצְרָיְמָה וַיִּקְנֵהוּ פּוֹטִיפַר סְרִיס פַּרְעֹה שַׂר הַטַּבָּחִים אִישׁ מִצְרִי מִיַּד הַיִּשְׁמְעֵאלִים אֲשֶׁר הוֹרִדֻהוּ שָׁמָּה׃ 39.1. וַיְהִי כְּדַבְּרָהּ אֶל־יוֹסֵף יוֹם יוֹם וְלֹא־שָׁמַע אֵלֶיהָ לִשְׁכַּב אֶצְלָהּ לִהְיוֹת עִמָּהּ׃ 39.1. And Joseph was brought down to Egypt; and Potiphar, an officer of Pharaoh’s, the captain of the guard, an Egyptian, bought him of the hand of the Ishmaelites, that had brought him down thither."
2. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 211 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

211. and again, they sold Joseph to Pharaoh's eunuch, the chief cook; and why is it that the aforesaid offices are absolutely committed to one who is neither man nor woman? Is it because men are by nature calculated to sow seed, and woman to receive it, and that the meeting of the two together is the cause of the generation, and also of the duration of all animals? But it belongs to an unproductive and barren soil, or one may rather say to one which has been made a eunuch, to delight in costly meats and drinks, and in superfluous extravagant preparations of delicacies, since it is unable to reality either to scatter the masculine seeds of virtue, or to receive and nourish them after they have been shed upon it; but, like a rough and stony field, only to destroy those things which ought to have lived for ever.
3. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 2.53-2.55 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.53. Who, therefore, thinks of costly purple garments? Who cares about transparent and thin summer robes? Who wishes for a garment delicate as a spider's web? Who is eager to have embroidered for him apparel flowered over with dyes and brocaded figures, by those who are skilful in sewing and weaving cunning embroidery, and are superior in their handwork to the imitative skill of the painter? Who, I say? Who, but vain opinion. VIII. 2.54. And, indeed, it is for the same reasons that we had need of houses, requiring them also for protection against the attacks of wild beasts, or of men more savage in their nature than even wild beasts. Why is it, then, that we adorn the pavements and floors with costly stones? And why do we travel over Asia, and Africa, and all Europe, and the islands, searching for pillars and capitals, and architraves, and selecting them with reference to their superior beauty? 2.55. And why are we anxious for, and why do we vie with one another in specimens of Doric, and Ionic, and Corinthian sculpture, and in all the refinements which luxurious men have devised in addition to the existing customs, adorning the capitals of their pillars? And why do we furnish our chambers for men and for women with golden ornaments? Is it not all from our being influenced by vain opinion?
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.174 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.174. But high seasonings, and cheesecakes, and sweetmeats, and all the other delicacies which the superfluous skill of confectioners and cooks concoct to cajole the illiterate, and unphilosophical, and most slavish of all the outward senses, namely, taste, which is never influenced by any noble sight, or by any perceptible lesson, but only by desire to indulge the appetites of the miserable belly, constantly engenders incurable diseases both in the body and the mind.
5. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.71-2.108, 3.107, 3.110, 3.113-3.116, 3.118, 3.126, 3.128-3.147, 3.151-3.152 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexandria Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
allegorical interpretation, literal interpretation) Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
brother of the soul, soul and Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
cynic/cynicism Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
diatribe Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
emotions (passio, perturbatio), therapy of Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
epistula ad menoch, ἐπιθυµία Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
imagery, citadel Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
joseph Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
musonius rufus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
origen Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
pleasure Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
pleasure (uoluptas, delectatio) Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
senses, five' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
serpent Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
soul, (platonic) parts of Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
stoa/stoic/stoicism Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 279
terminology of desire Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205