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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9247
Philo Of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.141-3.147
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 4.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4.14. וְאֹתִי צִוָּה יְהוָה בָּעֵת הַהִוא לְלַמֵּד אֶתְכֶם חֻקִּים וּמִשְׁפָּטִים לַעֲשֹׂתְכֶם אֹתָם בָּאָרֶץ אֲשֶׁר אַתֶּם עֹבְרִים שָׁמָּה לְרִשְׁתָּהּ׃ 4.14. And the LORD commanded me at that time to teach you statutes and ordices, that ye might do them in the land whither ye go over to possess it."
2. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, 19.3 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

19.3. וּמֹשֶׁה עָלָה אֶל־הָאֱלֹהִים וַיִּקְרָא אֵלָיו יְהוָה מִן־הָהָר לֵאמֹר כֹּה תֹאמַר לְבֵית יַעֲקֹב וְתַגֵּיד לִבְנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ 19.3. And Moses went up unto God, and the LORD called unto him out of the mountain, saying: ‘Thus shalt thou say to the house of Jacob, and tell the children of Israel:"
3. Hebrew Bible, Ezra, 7.6, 7.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

7.6. הוּא עֶזְרָא עָלָה מִבָּבֶל וְהוּא־סֹפֵר מָהִיר בְּתוֹרַת מֹשֶׁה אֲשֶׁר־נָתַן יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל וַיִּתֶּן־לוֹ הַמֶּלֶךְ כְּיַד־יְהוָה אֱלֹהָיו עָלָיו כֹּל בַּקָּשָׁתוֹ׃ 7.6. this Ezra went up from Babylon; and he was a ready scribe in the Law of Moses, which the LORD, the God of Israel, had given; and the king granted him all his request, according to the hand of the LORD his God upon him." 7.10. For Ezra had set his heart to seek the law of the LORD, and to do it, and to teach in Israel statutes and ordices."
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 257, 26, 256 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

256. For when Abraham had lost such a partner of his whole life, as our account has shown her to have been, and as the scriptures testify that she was, he still like a wrestler prevailed over the grief which attacked him and threatened to overwhelm his soul; strengthening and encouraging with great virtue and resolution, reason, the natural adversary of the passions, which indeed he had always taken as a counsellor during the whole of his life; but at this time above all others, he thought fit to be guided by it, when it was giving him the best and most expedient advice.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 79 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

79. and, indeed, in the same manner as the encyclical branches of education contribute to the proper comprehension of philosophy, so also does philosophy aid in the acquisition of wisdom; for philosophy is an attentive study of wisdom, and wisdom is the knowledge of all divine and human things, and of the respective causes of them. Therefore, just as encyclical accomplishments are the handmaidens of philosophy, so also is philosophy the handmaiden of wisdom;
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Decalogue, 98, 81 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Joseph, 82 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 53, 67, 150 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

150. And a proof of this is, that the one, having fallen back again into his ancient disease, departs, having been taken prisoner by those enemies who are in the soul; but the other, having guarded against all his designs, concealed in ambuscade, took every imaginable care to live at a distance from him. But the separate habitation he will arrange hereafter, but not yet. For at present, his speculations, as would be likely to be the case with a man who has but lately begun to apply himself to divine contemplation, have a want of solidity and steadiness in them. But when they have become more compact, and are established on a firmer footing, then he will be able to separate from himself the alluring and flattering disposition as an irreconcileable enemy, and one difficult to subdue:
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 76 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

76. This is the lesson which we have been taught concerning the man who in word indeed had his name changed, but who in reality changed his nature from the consideration of natural to that of moral philosophy, and who abandoned the contemplation of the world itself for the knowledge of the Being who created the world; by which knowledge he acquired piety, the most excellent of all possessions. XI.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 77, 144 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

144. And who could these have been but rational divine natures, some of them incorporeal and perceptible only by intellect, and others not destitute of bodily substance, such in fact as the stars? And he who associated with and lived among them was naturally living in a state of unmixed happiness. And being akin and nearly related to the ruler of all, inasmuch as a great deal of the divine spirit had flowed into him, he was eager both to say and to do everything which might please his father and his king, following him step by step in the paths which the virtues prepare and make plain, as those in which those souls alone are permitted to proceed who consider the attaining a likeness to God who made them as the proper end of their existence. LI.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On The Sacrifices of Cain And Abel, 121 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

121. These then, to speak with strict propriety are the prices to be paid for the preserving and ransoming of the soul which is desirous of freedom. And may we not say that in this way a very necessary doctrine is brought forward? Namely that every wise man is a ransom for a worthless one, who would not be able to last for even a short time, if the wise man by the exertion of mercy and prudence did not take thought for his lasting; as a physician opposing himself to the infirmities of an invalid, and either rendering them slighter, or altogether removing them unless the disease comes on with irresistible violence, and surmounts all the ingenuity of medical skill.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.103, 1.269, 1.288, 2.138, 3.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.103. For it would be mere folly that some men should be excluded from the priesthood by reason of the scars which exist on their bodies from ancient wounds, which are the emblem of misfortune indeed, but not of wickedness; but that those persons who, not at all out of necessity but from their own deliberate choice, have made a market of their beauty, when at last they slowly repent, should at once after leaving their lovers become united to priests, and should come from brothels and be admitted into the sacred precincts. For the scars and impressions of their old offences remain not the less in the souls of those who repent. 1.269. And what figurative meanings he conceals under these orders as symbols, we have accurately explained in another treatise, in which we have discussed the allegories. It is necessary, therefore, for those who are about to go into the temple to partake of the sacrifice, to be cleansed as to their bodies and as to their souls before their bodies. For the soul is the mistress and the queen, and is superior in every thing, as having received a more divine nature. And the things which cleanse the mind are wisdom and the doctrines of wisdom, which lead to the contemplation of the world and the things in it; and the sacred chorus of the rest of the virtues, and honourable and very praiseworthy actions in accordance with the virtues. 1.288. On this soul the sacred fire is continually kept burning, preserved with care and unextinguishable. But the light of the mind is wisdom; as, on the contrary, the darkness of the soul is folly. For what the light discernible by the outward senses is to the eyes, that is knowledge to reason with a view to the contemplation of incorporeal things discernible only by the intellect, the light of which is continually shining and never extinguished.LIII. 2.138. Secondly, it shows mercy and compassion on those who have been treated unjustly, whose burden of distress it lightens by giving them a share in grace and gift; for the double portion of the inheriting son was no less likely to please the mother, who will be encouraged by the kindness of the law, which did not permit her and her offspring to be totally overcome by their enemies. 3.1. There was once a time when, devoting my leisure to philosophy and to the contemplation of the world and the things in it, I reaped the fruit of excellent, and desirable, and blessed intellectual feelings, being always living among the divine oracles and doctrines, on which I fed incessantly and insatiably, to my great delight, never entertaining any low or grovelling thoughts, nor ever wallowing in the pursuit of glory or wealth, or the delights of the body, but I appeared to be raised on high and borne aloft by a certain inspiration of the soul, and to dwell in the regions of the sun and moon, and to associate with the whole heaven, and the whole universal world.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 177, 51, 144 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

144. And if any one should desire to dress flesh with milk, let him do so without incurring the double reproach of inhumanity and impiety. There are innumerable herds of cattle in every direction, and some are every day milked by the cowherds, or goatherds, or shepherds, since, indeed, the milk is the greatest source of profit to all breeders of stock, being partly used in a liquid state and partly allowed to coagulate and solidify, so as to make cheese. So that, as there is the greatest abundance of lambs, and kids, and all other kinds of animals, the man who seethes the flesh of any one of them in the milk of its own mother is exhibiting a terrible perversity of disposition, and exhibits himself as wholly destitute of that feeling which, of all others, is the most indispensable to, and most nearly akin to, a rational soul, namely, compassion. XXVII.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, 1.158-1.159, 2.216 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.158. What more shall I say? Has he not also enjoyed an even greater communion with the Father and Creator of the universe, being thought unworthy of being called by the same appellation? For he also was called the god and king of the whole nation, and he is said to have entered into the darkness where God was; that is to say, into the invisible, and shapeless, and incorporeal world, the essence, which is the model of all existing things, where he beheld things invisible to mortal nature; for, having brought himself and his own life into the middle, as an excellently wrought picture, he established himself as a most beautiful and Godlike work, to be a model for all those who were inclined to imitate him. 1.159. And happy are they who have been able to take, or have even diligently laboured to take, a faithful copy of this excellence in their own souls; for let the mind, above all other parts, take the perfect appearance of virtue, and if that cannot be, at all events let it feel an unhesitating and unvarying desire to acquire that appearance; 2.216. in accordance with which custom, even to this day, the Jews hold philosophical discussions on the seventh day, disputing about their national philosophy, and devoting that day to the knowledge and consideration of the subjects of natural philosophy; for as for their houses of prayer in the different cities, what are they, but schools of wisdom, and courage, and temperance, and justice, and piety, and holiness, and every virtue, by which human and divine things are appreciated, and placed upon a proper footing?
15. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. for if the sight of elders, or instructors, or rulers, or parents, excites those who behold them to reverence and orderly conduct, and to an admiration of and desire for a life of moderation and temperance, how great a bulwark of virtue and excellence must we not expect to find in those souls which, after having investigated the nature of every created thing, have learnt to contemplate the uncreated and Divine Being, the first good of all, the one beautiful, and happy, and glorious, and blessed being; better, if one is to tell the plain truth, than the good itself; more beautiful than the beautiful itself; more happy than happiness itself; more blessed than blessedness itself; and, in short, if anything else in the world is so, more perfect than any one of the abovementioned things.
16. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.8, 2.71-2.108, 3.107, 3.110, 3.113-3.116, 3.118, 3.126, 3.128-3.140, 3.142-3.147, 3.151-3.152, 3.155 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 4.177 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 246 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

246. But the attacks and conflicts of those powers which are not irreconcilable resemble the frequent effect of the discussions and quarrels about doctrines which arise among the Sophists. For inasmuch as they all labour for one end, namely the contemplation of the things of nature, they may be said to be friends; but inasmuch as they do not agree in their particular investigations they may be said to be in a state of domestic sedition; as, for instance, those who affirm the universe to be uncreated are at variance with those who insist upon its creation; and again those who urge that it will be destroyed are at strife with those who affirm that it is indeed perishable by nature but that it never will be destroyed, because it is held together by a more powerful chain, the will of the Creator. And again, those who affirm that there is nothing self-existent, but that everything has been created, are at variance with those who are of a contrary opinion. Those too, who say that man is the measure of all things, differ from those who would restrain the judicial faculties of the outward senses and of the intellect. And, in short, to sum up all these differences in a few words, those who represent everything as incomprehensible are at variance with those who say that a great number of things are properly understood.
19. Tosefta, Sanhedrin, 4.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, 6.9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

21. Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin, None (3rd cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)

22. Cassian, Conferences, 5.3 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

23. Anon., 4 Ezra, 14.42

14.42. And the Most High gave understanding to the five men, and by turns they wrote what was dictated, in characters which they did not know. They sat forty days, and wrote during the daytime, and ate their bread at night.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
allegorical interpretation, literal interpretation) Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
anger, anger natural or necessary among christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; alternative ideals, though apatheia represents progress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385, 386
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; clement of alexandria Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; for philo, repentance and pity Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; origen Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
appetite (epithumia), natural or necessary among certain christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
assimilation Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 93
augustine, attack on stoic apatheia, misrepresents stoic acceptance of first movements as acceptance of emotion Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
body Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90
cassian, john, founder of monastery at monte cassino, some emotions natural Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
clement of alexandria, church father Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
climacus, christian ascetic, some emotions natural Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
contemplation Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90, 93
drink Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90
emotions (passio, perturbatio), therapy of Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
epistula ad menoch, ἐπιθυµία Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
ezra (the scribe) Fraade, Multilingualism and Translation in Ancient Judaism: Before and After Babel (2023) 93
food Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90
frank, dan Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
gluttony, natural or necessary among certain christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
gregory of nyssa, church father, apatheia an ideal, but metriopatheia can sometimes be apatheia in a secondary sense Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
immortality Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90
isaiah the solitary, st, some emotions natural Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
liminality Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90
lust, natural or necessary among certain christians Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
maimonides, jewish philosopher, apatheia and metriopatheia alternative ideals Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
maimonides, jewish philosopher, pride and anger excluded from both Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; natural and/or necessary emotions Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; natural and/or necessary pleasures Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; natural thoughts Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; not all emotions acceptable Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
metriopatheia, moderate, moderation of, emotion; philo Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
mimesis Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90
mind Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90, 93
moses Fraade, Multilingualism and Translation in Ancient Judaism: Before and After Babel (2023) 93; Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90, 93
natural, necessary, emotion Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
natural, necessary, pleasure Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
natural, necessary, thoughts Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
origen Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
pedagogy Fraade, Multilingualism and Translation in Ancient Judaism: Before and After Babel (2023) 93
philo, clement of alexandria, basil Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, apatheia and metriopatheia alternative ideals but apatheia is progress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385, 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, emotions helpful Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, pity valued and compatible with apatheia Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, repentance valued Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, some pleasures necessary Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
plato, some desires and pleasures necessary Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
pleasure, natural and/or necessary pleasures Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
pleasure (uoluptas, delectatio) Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
progressing Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385, 386
ps.-makarios (makarios, desert father, mentor of evagrius) , some thoughts natural rather than bad' Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
rüther, theodore Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
scribe Fraade, Multilingualism and Translation in Ancient Judaism: Before and After Babel (2023) 93
serpent Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
soul, (platonic) parts of Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
spanneut, michel Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
telos Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 90, 93
terminology of desire Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
theodoret, christian, some emotion necessary and useful Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
torah Fraade, Multilingualism and Translation in Ancient Judaism: Before and After Babel (2023) 93
tosefta Fraade, Multilingualism and Translation in Ancient Judaism: Before and After Babel (2023) 93
ware, kallistos Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 386
wisdom (sophia), lower wisdom (achamoth) Dunderberg, Beyond Gnosticism: Myth, Lifestyle, and Society in the School of Valentinus (2008) 250
worship Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 93
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385, 386