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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9247
Philo Of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.128-3.139
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 17.15-17.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

17.15. שׂוֹם תָּשִׂים עָלֶיךָ מֶלֶךְ אֲשֶׁר יִבְחַר יְהוָה אֱלֹהֶיךָ בּוֹ מִקֶּרֶב אַחֶיךָ תָּשִׂים עָלֶיךָ מֶלֶךְ לֹא תוּכַל לָתֵת עָלֶיךָ אִישׁ נָכְרִי אֲשֶׁר לֹא־אָחִיךָ הוּא׃ 17.16. רַק לֹא־יַרְבֶּה־לּוֹ סוּסִים וְלֹא־יָשִׁיב אֶת־הָעָם מִצְרַיְמָה לְמַעַן הַרְבּוֹת סוּס וַיהוָה אָמַר לָכֶם לֹא תֹסִפוּן לָשׁוּב בַּדֶּרֶךְ הַזֶּה עוֹד׃ 17.15. thou shalt in any wise set him king over thee, whom the LORD thy God shall choose; one from among thy brethren shalt thou set king over thee; thou mayest not put a foreigner over thee, who is not thy brother." 17.16. Only he shall not multiply horses to himself, nor cause the people to return to Egypt, to the end that he should multiply horses; forasmuch as the LORD hath said unto you: ‘Ye shall henceforth return no more that way.’"
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 9.20, 49.17 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

49.17. יְהִי־דָן נָחָשׁ עֲלֵי־דֶרֶךְ שְׁפִיפֹן עֲלֵי־אֹרַח הַנֹּשֵׁךְ עִקְּבֵי־סוּס וַיִּפֹּל רֹכְבוֹ אָחוֹר׃ 9.20. And Noah, the man of the land, began and planted a vineyard." 49.17. Dan shall be a serpent in the way, A horned snake in the path, That biteth the horse’s heels, So that his rider falleth backward."
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 257, 256 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

256. For when Abraham had lost such a partner of his whole life, as our account has shown her to have been, and as the scriptures testify that she was, he still like a wrestler prevailed over the grief which attacked him and threatened to overwhelm his soul; strengthening and encouraging with great virtue and resolution, reason, the natural adversary of the passions, which indeed he had always taken as a counsellor during the whole of his life; but at this time above all others, he thought fit to be guided by it, when it was giving him the best and most expedient advice.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 69, 67 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

67. But the foolish man proceeds always by means of the two passions together, both anger and desire, omitting no opportunity, and discarding reason as his pilot and judge. But the man who is contrary to him has extirpated anger and desire from his nature, and has enlisted himself under divine reason as his guide; as also Moses, that faithful servant of God, did. Who, when he is offering the burnt offerings of the soul, "washes out the Belly;" that is to say, he washes out the whole seat of desires, and he takes away "the breast of the ram of the Consecration;" that is to say, that whole of the warlike disposition, that so the remainder, the better portion of the soul, the rational part, having no longer anything to draw it in a different direction or to counteract its natural impulses, may indulge its own free and noble inclinations towards everything that is beautiful;
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 159, 163, 158 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

158. And the man devoted to pleasure is free form none of the aforementioned evils; for it is with difficulty that he can raise his head, being weighed down and dragged down, since intemperance trips him up and keeps him down. And he feeds, not on heavenly food, which wisdom offers to contemplative men by means of discourses and opinions; but on that which is put forth by the earth in the varying seasons of the year, from which arise drunkenness and voracity, and licentiousness, breaking through and inflaming the appetites of the belly, and enslaving them in subjection to gluttony, by which they strengthen the impetuous passions, the seat of which is beneath the belly; and make them break forth. And they lick up the result of the labours of cooks and tavern-keepers; and at times some of them in ecstasy with the flavour of the delicious food, moves about his head and reaches forward, being desirous to participate in the sight. And when he sees an expensively furnished table, he throws himself bodily upon the delicacies which are abundantly prepared, and devotes himself to them, wishing to be filled with them all together, and so to depart, having no other end in view than that he should allow nothing of such a sumptuous preparation to be wasted. Owing to which conduct, he too, carries about poison in his teeth, no less than the serpent does;
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 4.157-4.158 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.157. The all-wise Moses seeing this by the power of his own soul, makes no mention of any authority being assigned by lot, but he has chosen to direct that all offices shall be elected to; therefore he says, "Thou shalt not appoint a stranger to be a ruler over thee, but one of thine own Brethren,"{37}{#de 17:15.} implying that the appointment is to be a voluntary choice, and an irreproachable selection of a ruler, whom the whole multitude with one accord shall choose; and God himself will add his vote on favour of, and set his seal to ratify such an election, that being who is the confirmer of all advantageous things, looking upon the man so chosen as the flower of his race, just as the sight is the best thing in the body.XXXI. 4.158. And Moses gives also two reasons, on account of which it is not proper for strangers to be elected to situations of authority; in the first place, that they may not amass a quantity of silver, and gold, and flocks, and raise great and iniquitously earned riches for themselves, out of the poverty of those who are subjected to them; and secondly, that they may not make the nation quit their ancient abodes to gratify their own covetous desires, and so compel them to emigrate, and to wander about to and fro in interminable wanderings, suggesting to them hopes of the acquisition of greater blessings, which shall never be fulfilled, by which they come to lose those advantages of which they were in the secure enjoyment.
7. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.71-2.108, 3.107, 3.110, 3.113-3.116, 3.118, 3.126, 3.129-3.147, 3.151-3.152, 3.155 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 4.177 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aaron Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421; Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
abram/abraham, hope of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
aesclepius Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 52
alexandria Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
allegorical interpretation, literal interpretation) Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
allegory Rosenblum, The Jewish Dietary Laws in the Ancient World (2016) 67
apatheia, freedom from, eradication of, emotion (; alternative ideals, though apatheia represents progress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
aristides, aelius Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 52
augustine, attack on stoic apatheia, misrepresents stoic acceptance of first movements as acceptance of emotion Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
dan Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
diogenes laertius Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
emotions, bad Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
emotions, good Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
emotions, lack of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
emotions, moderation of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
emotions, pre-emotion Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
emotions (passio, perturbatio), therapy of Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
epistula ad menoch, ἐπιθυµία Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
eve Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
frank, dan Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
happiness Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
herdsman Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
hope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
israel Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
maimonides, jewish philosopher, apatheia and metriopatheia alternative ideals Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
origen Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
passions, darts of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
passions, horse, symbol of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
passions Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
philo of alexandria, jewish philosopher, apatheia and metriopatheia alternative ideals but apatheia is progress Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
pleasure (uoluptas, delectatio) Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
plutarch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
progressing Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385
reptiles Rosenblum, The Jewish Dietary Laws in the Ancient World (2016) 67
serpent, of moses Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
serpent Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
soul, (platonic) parts of Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
soul, diseases of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
soul, wounded by passions' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
soul Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2013) 184
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
terminology of desire Nisula, Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence (2012) 205
time Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 421
zeno of citium, stoic, hence different conception of freedom from emotion(apatheia) Sorabji, Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation (2000) 385