Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9247
Philo Of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.105-3.107
NaN
NaN
NaN


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

16 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 18.12-18.15 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

18.12. וַתִּצְחַק שָׂרָה בְּקִרְבָּהּ לֵאמֹר אַחֲרֵי בְלֹתִי הָיְתָה־לִּי עֶדְנָה וַאדֹנִי זָקֵן׃ 18.13. וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה אֶל־אַבְרָהָם לָמָּה זֶּה צָחֲקָה שָׂרָה לֵאמֹר הַאַף אֻמְנָם אֵלֵד וַאֲנִי זָקַנְתִּי׃ 18.14. הֲיִפָּלֵא מֵיְהוָה דָּבָר לַמּוֹעֵד אָשׁוּב אֵלֶיךָ כָּעֵת חַיָּה וּלְשָׂרָה בֵן׃ 18.15. וַתְּכַחֵשׁ שָׂרָה לֵאמֹר לֹא צָחַקְתִּי כִּי יָרֵאָה וַיֹּאמֶר לֹא כִּי צָחָקְתְּ׃ 18.12. And Sarah laughed within herself, saying: ‘After I am waxed old shall I have pleasure, my lord being old also?’" 18.13. And the LORD said unto Abraham: ‘Wherefore did Sarah laugh, saying: Shall I of a surety bear a child, who am old?" 18.14. Is any thing too hard for the LORD. At the set time I will return unto thee, when the season cometh round, and Sarah shall have a son.’" 18.15. Then Sarah denied, saying: ‘I laughed not’; for she was afraid. And He said: ‘Nay; but thou didst laugh.’"
2. Hesiod, Works And Days, 243, 242 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

242. And honest, children grow in amity
3. Aristobulus Cassandreus, Fragments, 5 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 13, 12 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Now the first example of an enemy placed directly in front of one is derived from what is said in the case of Cain, that "he went out from the face of God, and dwelt in the land of Nod, in the front of Eden." Now Nod being interpreted means commotion, and Eden means delight. The one therefore is a symbol of wickedness agitating the soul, and the other of virtue which creates for the soul a state of tranquillity and happiness, not meaning by happiness that effeminate luxury which is derived from the indulgence of the irrational passion of pleasure, but a joy free from toil and free from hardship, which is enjoyed with great tranquillity. 12. in this manner those who are skilful in the art of medicine, save their patients; for they do not think it advisable to give food before they have removed the causes of their diseases; for while the diseases remain, food is useless, being the pernicious materials of their sufferings. III.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 180-181, 179 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

179. Very appropriately therefore has God attributed the creation of this being, man, to his lieutets, saying, "Let us make man," in order that the successes of the intellect may be attributed to him alone, but the errors of the being thus created, to his subordinate power: for it did not appear to be suitable to the dignity of God, the ruler of the universe, to make the road to wickedness in a rational soul by his own agency; for which reason he has committed to those about him the creation of this portion of the universe; for it was necessary that the voluntary principle, as the counterpoise to the involuntary principle, should be established and made known, with a view to the completion and perfection of the universe. XXXVI.
6. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

70. And he made us of the powers which were subordinate to him, not only for the reason which has been mentioned, but also because the soul of man alone was destined to receive notions of good and evil, and to choose one of the two, since it could not adopt both. Therefore, he thought it necessary to assign the origin of evil to other workmen than himself, --but to retain the generation of good for himself alone. XIV.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 190-192, 189 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

189. But the aforesaid numbers are perfect, and especially according to the sacred scriptures. And let us consider each of them: now first of all there is the son of the just Noah and the ancestor of the seeing race, and he is said to have been a hundred years old when he begat Arphaxad, and the meaning of the name of Arphaxad is, "he disturbed sorrow." At all events it is a good thing that the offspring of the soul should confuse, and disorder, and destroy that miserable thing iniquity, so full of evils.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 75 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

75. It is on this account that Moses says, at the creation of man alone that God said, "Let us make man," which expression shows an assumption of other beings to himself as assistants, in order that God, the governor of all things, might have all the blameless intentions and actions of man, when he does right attributed to him; and that his other assistants might bear the imputation of his contrary actions. For it was fitting that the Father should in the eyes of his children be free from all imputation of evil; and vice and energy in accordance with vice are evil.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 80 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

80. For what," says he, "could be better than that one's thoughts, one's contemplations, one's conjectures, one's suspicions, in a word, all one's ideas, should, as I may say, proceed on well-set feet, so as to arrive at their desired goal without stumbling, the mind being borne witness to in everything that is uttered." But I, if any man employs a felicitous and well directed mind to good objects only, account that man happy taking the law for my teacher in this view. For the law called Joseph "a prosperous Man," not in all things, but "in those matters in which God gave him prosperity." And all the gifts of God are good.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 4.187 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.187. for this is to act in imitation of God, since he also has the power to do either good or evil, but his inclination causes him only to do good. And the creation and arrangement of the world shows this, for he has summoned what had previously no being into existence, creating order out of disorder, and distinctive qualities out of things which had no such qualities, and similarities out of things dissimilar, and identity out of things which were different, and intercommunion and harmony out of things which had previously no communication nor agreement, and equality out of inequality, and light out of darkness; for he is always anxious to exert his beneficent powers in order to change whatever is disorderly from its present evil condition, and to transform it so as to bring it into a better state.XXXVI.
11. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 3.83-3.87, 3.104, 3.106-3.107, 3.217-3.219 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 120, 122-125, 130-137, 119 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

119. But to the impious Cain, neither does the earth contribute anything to give him vigour, even though he never concerns himself about anything which is exterior to it; on which account, in the next sentence, he is found "groaning and trembling upon the Earth," that is to say, under the influence of grief and terror; and such also is the miserable life of a wicked man, who has received for his inheritance the most painful of the four passions, pain and terror; the one being equivalent to groaning, and the other to trembling; for it is inevitable, that some evil should either be present to or impending over such a man. Now the expectation of impending evil causes fear, but the suffering of present evil causes pain.
13. Philo of Alexandria, That Every Good Person Is Free, 84 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

84. Accordingly, the sacred volumes present an infinite number of instances of the disposition devoted to the love of God, and of a continued and uninterrupted purity throughout the whole of life, of a careful avoidance of oaths and of falsehood, and of a strict adherence to the principle of looking on the Deity as the cause of everything which is good and of nothing which is evil. They also furnish us with many proofs of a love of virtue, such as abstinence from all covetousness of money, from ambition, from indulgence in pleasures, temperance, endurance, and also moderation, simplicity, good temper, the absence of pride, obedience to the laws, steadiness, and everything of that kind; and, lastly, they bring forward as proofs of the love of mankind, goodwill, equality beyond all power of description, and fellowship, about which it is not unreasonable to say a few words.
14. Aristobulus Milesius, Fragments, 5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 231, 205

205. established, he asked How he could continue to be rich? After a brief reflection, the man who had been asked the question replied If he did nothing unworthy of his position, never acted licentiously, never lavished expense on empty and vain pursuits, but by acts of benevolence made all his subjects well disposed towards himself. For it is God who is the author of all good things and


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abram/abraham, fall Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 224
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 347
allegory/allegoresis Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 224
aristobulus, gods resting Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
aristobulus, sabbath, philosophical respectability Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
aristobulus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
arithmology, five Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 197
chrysippus Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
emotions, good Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
emotions Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
esau Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 347
etymology Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
evil, god as source Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
exposition of the law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 347
fall, epistemic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 224
hesiod Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
homer, god source of good and evil Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
homer Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
hope Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
jethro Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 347
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
laughter Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
law, natural Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 347
law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 197
levite Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 224, 347
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 347
nothingness Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 224
offering, first fruit (tithe) Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
onomasticon Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
philo of alexandria, god and evil Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
philo of alexandria Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
priest Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
prophets Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 347
ps.-orpheus, good and evil Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135, 224
soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
stoicism, stoics, god sends calamities Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
stoicism, stoics Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 135
virtue' Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 347
zeus, source of calamities Potter Suh and Holladay, Hellenistic Jewish Literature and the New Testament: Collected Essays (2021) 143