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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9247
Philo Of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.95
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

20 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 8.16 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

8.16. הַמַּאֲכִלְךָ מָן בַּמִּדְבָּר אֲשֶׁר לֹא־יָדְעוּן אֲבֹתֶיךָ לְמַעַן עַנֹּתְךָ וּלְמַעַן נַסֹּתֶךָ לְהֵיטִבְךָ בְּאַחֲרִיתֶךָ׃ 8.16. who fed thee in the wilderness with manna, which thy fathers knew not, that He might afflict thee, and that He might prove thee, to do thee good at thy latter end;"
2. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, None (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2.7. וַיִּיצֶר יְהוָה אֱלֹהִים אֶת־הָאָדָם עָפָר מִן־הָאֲדָמָה וַיִּפַּח בְּאַפָּיו נִשְׁמַת חַיִּים וַיְהִי הָאָדָם לְנֶפֶשׁ חַיָּה׃ 2.7. Then the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul."
3. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 168-207, 256-257, 167 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

167. We have now, then, given a full explanation concerning the vision which appeared to Abraham, and concerning his celebrated and allglorious hospitality, in which the entertainer, who appeared to himself to be entertaining others was himself entertained; expounding every part of the passage with as much accuracy as we were able. But we must not pass over in silence the most important action of all, which is worthy of being listened to. For I was nearly saying that it is of more importance than all the actions of piety and religion put together. So we must say what seems to be reasonable concerning it.
4. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 101, 95, 97, 100 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

100. therefore the character of patient endurance is good, and capable of receiving immortality, which is the perfect good. But the character of pleasure is evil, bringing in its train the greatest of all punishments, death. On which account Moses says, "Let Dan become a serpent," and that not in any other place rather than in the road.
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 41 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

41. for since we say, that woman is to be understood symbolically as the outward sense, and since knowledge consists in alienation from the outward sense and from the body, it is plain that the lovers of wisdom must repudiate the outward sense rather than choose it, and is not this quite natural? for they who live with these men are in name indeed wives, but in fact virtues. Sarah is princess and guide, Rebecca is perseverance in what is good; Leah again is virtue, fainting and weary at the long continuance of exertion, which every foolish man declines, and avoids, and repudiates; and Zipporah, the wife of Moses, is virtue, mounting up from earth to heaven, and arriving at a just comprehension of the divine and blessed virtues which exist there, and she is called a bird. 41. For if the uncreated, and immortal, and everlasting God, who is in need of nothing and who is the maker of the universe, and the benefactor and King of kings, and God of gods, cannot endure to overlook even the meanest of human beings, but has thought even such worthy of being banqueted in sacred oracles and laws, as if he were about to give him a lovefeast, and to prepare for him alone a banquet for the refreshing and expanding of his soul instructed in the divine will and in the manner in which the great ceremonies ought to be performed, how can it be right for me, who am a mere mortal, to hold my head up high and to allow myself to be puffed up, behaving with insolence to my equals whose fortunes may, perhaps, not be equal to mine, but whose relationship to me is equal and complete, inasmuch as they are set down as the children of one mother, the common nature of all men?
6. Philo of Alexandria, On The Preliminary Studies, 166, 170-171, 173, 177-178, 24-25, 31-33, 164 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

164. and then he tempted Him." For the invisible trial and proofs of the soul are in labouring and in enduring bitterness; for then it is hard to know which way it will incline; for many men are very speedily fatigued and fall away, thinking labour a terrible adversary, and they let their hands fall out of weakness, like tired wrestlers, determining to return to Egypt to the indulgence of their passions.
7. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 55-59, 70, 54 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

54. And the scripture here appears to me to show very plainly, that customs are regarded by men more than by women, as is clear by the words of Rachel, who admires only those things which are perceptible by the outward senses; for she says to her father, "Be not angry, my lord, that I am unable to rise up before thee in thy presence, because the custom of women is upon Me.
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 138-139, 137 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

137. Those also who have inquired what it is that nourishes the soul, for as Moses says, "They knew not what it was," learnt at last and found that it was the word of God and the divine reason, from which flows all kinds of instinctive and everlasting wisdom. This is the heavenly nourishment which the holy scripture indicates, saying, in the character of the cause of all things, "Behold I rain upon you bread from Heaven;
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 188 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

188. For the name Charran, being interpreted, means "a hole;" and holes are the emblems of the places of the outward sense. For in some sense they are all holes and caves, the eyes being the caves in which the sight dwells, the ears those of hearing, the nostrils of those smelling, the throat the cavern of taste, and the whole frame of the body, being the abode of touch.
10. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 184, 254, 132 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

132. for it is absurd to suppose that there was one who was a man, and another of whom bastard and illegitimate offspring were descended: and, indeed, Moses calls the man of an intellect devoted to virtue a god, when he says, "The Lord, seeing that Leah was hated, opened her Womb.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 158-166, 62, 157 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

157. And these things are not mere fabulous inventions, in which the race of poets and sophists delights, but are rather types shadowing forth some allegorical truth, according to some mystical explanation. And any one who follows a reasonable train of conjecture, will say with great propriety, that the aforesaid serpent is the symbol of pleasure, because in the first place he is destitute of feet, and crawls on his belly with his face downwards. In the second place, because he uses lumps of clay for food. Thirdly, because he bears poison in his teeth, by which it is his nature to kill those who are bitten by him.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 154, 20, 22, 153 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

153. And we must inquire the cause why the handmaid gave the servant drink from the fountain, but gave the camels water from the well. May it not perhaps be that the stream here signifies the sacred scripture itself, which irrigates the sciences, and that the well is rather akin to memory? For the depths which he has already mentioned, he produces by means of memory as it were out of a well;
13. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.25, 1.34, 1.194-1.195 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.25. There are, then, four principal elements in us, the body, the external sense, the speech, and the mind. Now of these, three are not uncertain or unintelligible in every respect, but they contain some indication in themselves by which they are comprehended. 1.34. For among created things, the heaven is holy in the world, in accordance with which body, the imperishable and indestructible natures revolve; and in man the mind is holy, being a sort of fragment of the Deity, and especially according to the statement of Moses, who says, "God breathed into his face the breath of life, and man became a living Soul. 1.194. In this manner, too, Moses is called up to the bush. For, the scripture says, "When he saw that he was turning aside to see, God called him out of the bush, and said, Moses, Moses: and he said, What is it, Lord?" And Abraham also, on the occasion of offering up his beloved and only son as a burnt-offering, when he was beginning to sacrifice him, and when he had given proof of his piety, was forbidden to destroy the self-taught race, Isaac by name, from among men; 1.195. for at the beginning of his account of this transaction, Moses says that "God did tempt Abraham, and said unto him, Abraham, Abraham; and he said, Behold, here am I. And he said unto him, Take now thy beloved son Isaac, whom thou lovest, and offer him up." And when he had brought the victim to the altar, then the angel of the Lord called him out of heaven, saying, "Abraham, Abraham," and he answered, "Behold, here am I. And he said, Lay not thy hand upon the child, and do nothing to Him.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 4.173 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.173. And we can find clear instances of both kinds in the sacred laws, which it is well for us to imitate; for there was once a time in which Moses, alone by himself, decided all causes and all matters of legal controversy, labouring from morning till night. But after a time his father-inlaw came to him, and seeing with what a weight of business he was overwhelmed, as all those who had any disputes were everlastingly coming upon him, he gave him most excellent advice, counselling him to choose subordinate magistrates, that they might decide the less important affairs, and that he might have only the more serious causes to occupy him, and by this means provide himself with time for Rest.{39}{#ex 18:14.}
15. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 2.71-2.94, 2.96-2.108, 3.110, 3.113, 3.118, 3.126, 3.128-3.147, 3.155, 3.162, 3.180, 3.203-3.208, 3.210 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.31-1.41, 3.56, 4.73 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 84 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

84. And again he says, "The priest shall not be a man by himself, when he goeth into the holy of holies, until he cometh Out;" speaking not with reference to the motions of the body, but to those of the soul; for the mind, while it is offering holy sacrifices to God in all purity, is not a human but a divine mind; but when it is serving any human object, it then descends from heaven and becomes changed, or rather it falls to the earth and goes out, even though the mind may still remain within.
18. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 29 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

29. but there are some adversaries who, by reason of their vigorous body, their antagonists having succumbed, have gained the prize of victory without a struggle, not having even had, to descend into the arena to contend for it, but obtaining the chief honours on account of their incomparable strength. Using such a power as this with reference to the most divine thing that is in us, namely, our mind, "Isaac goes forth into the Plain;" not for the purpose of contending with any body, since all those who might have been his antagonists, are terrified at the greatness and exceeding excellence of his nature in all things; but only washing to meet in private, and to converse in private with the fellow traveller and guide of his path and of his soul, namely God.
19. Philo of Alexandria, That God Is Unchangeable, 42 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

42. Now the outward sense, as indeed its name shows, in some degree is a kind of insertion, placing the things that are made apparent to it in the mind; for in the mind, since that is the greatest storehouse and receptacle for all things, is everything placed and treasured up which comes under the operation of the sense of seeing or hearing, or the other organs of the outward senses.
20. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 1.303 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.303. 8. Now each of these had handmaids, by their father’s donation. Zilpha was handmaid to Lea, and Bilha to Rachel; by no means slaves, but however subject to their mistresses. Now Lea was sorely troubled at her husband’s love to her sister; and she expected she should be better esteemed if she bare him children: so she entreated God perpetually;


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
allegorical interpretation,literal interpretation) Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 205
allegory Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 165
bilhah Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
body Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246; Putthoff (2016), Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology, 77
breath Putthoff (2016), Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology, 77
captives Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
chaldeans Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
concubines Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
dan Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
divinity Putthoff (2016), Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology, 77
emotions (passio,perturbatio),therapy of Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 205
envy Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
epistula ad menoch,ἐπιθυµία Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 205
ethics Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
eve Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
excellence Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
face Putthoff (2016), Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology, 77
fragment Putthoff (2016), Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology, 77
god,cause Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246
greed Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
gregory of nyssa Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
holy,holiness Putthoff (2016), Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology, 77
horseman Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
irenaeus Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
israel,israelites Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
jacob Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 165; Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
jesus Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
joseph Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
justin Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
leah Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246; Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 165
menstruation Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 165
mind Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246; Putthoff (2016), Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology, 77
moderation Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
moses Putthoff (2016), Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology, 77; Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
nobility Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
origen Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195; Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 205
passions Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
pedagogy Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
pleasure,serpent symbol of Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
pleasure (uoluptas,delectatio) Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 205
rachel Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246; Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 165
reason Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
rebecca Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 165
sarah Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 165
schenkl,c. Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
sense-perception Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246
senses,five Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246
serpent,of eve Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
serpent,of moses Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195
serpent Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 205; Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
slaves Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413
soul,(platonic) parts of Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 205
soul Geljon and Runia (2013), Philo of Alexandria: On Cultivation: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 195; Putthoff (2016), Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology, 77
souls Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
symbolic interpretation,of biblical figures Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246
terminology of desire Nisula (2012), Augustine and the Functions of Concupiscence, 205
testing passim,agents of Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
testing passim,roles in Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
thanksgiving Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246
virtue Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 165; Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
virtues' Geljon and Runia (2019), Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary, 246
wilderness passim,place Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
wisdom Smith and Stuckenbruck (2020), Testing and Temptation in Second Temple Jewish and Early Christian Texts, 8
woman Sly (1990), Philo's Perception of Women, 165
zilpah Wilson (2010), Philo of Alexandria: On Virtues: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary, 413