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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9247
Philo Of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.64


nanGeneric virtue, therefore, derives its beginning from Eden, which is the wisdom of God; which rejoices and exults, and triumphs, being delighted at and honoured on account of nothing else, except its Father, God, and the four particular virtues, are branches from the generic virtue, which like a river waters all the good actions of each, with an abundant stream of benefits.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "17.15" "17.15" "17 15" \n1 16.1 16.1 16 1 \n2 16.2 16.2 16 2 \n3 2 2 2 None (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Aristotle, Rhetoric, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3. Dead Sea Scrolls, Hodayot, 20.7, 20.11-20.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Dead Sea Scrolls, Hodayot, 20.7, 20.11-20.13 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

6. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 52, 6-7, 5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

5. for these men have been living and rational laws; and the lawgiver has magnified them for two reasons; first, because he was desirous to show that the injunctions which are thus given are not inconsistent with nature; and, secondly, that he might prove that it is not very difficult or laborious for those who wish to live according to the laws established in these books, since the earliest men easily and spontaneously obeyed the unwritten principle of legislation before any one of the particular laws were written down at all. So that a man may very properly say, that the written laws are nothing more than a memorial of the life of the ancients, tracing back in an antiquarian spirit, the actions and reasonings which they adopted;
8. Philo of Alexandria, On The Eternity of The World, 125 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

125. But we must now proceed to consider the question which we postponed till the present time. What sort of a part of the earth is that, that we may begin from this, whether it is greater or less, that is not dissolved by time? Do not the very hardest and strongest stones become hard and decayed through the weakness of their conformation (and this conformation is a sort of course of a highly strained spirit, a bond not indissoluble, but only very difficult to unloose), in consequence of which they are broken up and made fluid, so that they are dissolved first of all into a thin dust, and afterwards are wholly wasted away and destroyed? Again, if the water were never agitated by the winds, but were left immoveable for ever, would it not from inaction and tranquillity become dead? at all events it is changed by such stagnation, and becomes very foetid and foul-smelling, like an animal deprived of life.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On The Cherubim, 12, 3-9, 92, 10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Why then do we wonder if God once for all banished Adam, that is to say, the mind out of the district of the virtues, after he had once contracted folly, that incurable disease, and if he never permitted him again to return, when he also drives out and banishes from wisdom and from the wise man every sophist, and the mother of sophists, the teaching that is of elementary instruction, while he calls the names of wisdom and of the wise man Abraham, and Sarah. IV. 10. He also considered this point, in the second place, that it is indispensable that the soul of the man who is about to receive sacred laws should be thoroughly cleansed and purified from all stains, however difficult to be washed out, which the promiscuous multitude of mixed men from all quarters has impregnated cities with;
10. Philo of Alexandria, On Drunkenness, 97-98, 96 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

96. For it is said, that when Joshua heard the people crying out he said to Moses, "There is the sound of war in the camp. And he said, It is not the voice of man beginning to exert themselves in battle, nor is it the voice of men betaking themselves to flight, but it is the voice of men beginning revelry and drunkenness that I hear: and when he came near to the camp he saw the calf and the Dances." And the enigmatical meaning, which is concealed under these figurative expressions, we will explain to the best of our ability. XXV.
11. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 52, 51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

51. And he calls Bethuel the father of Rebekkah. How, then, can the daughter of God, namely, wisdom, be properly called a father? is it because the name indeed of wisdom is feminine but the sex masculine? For indeed all the virtues bear the names of women, but have the powers and actions of full-grown men, since whatever is subsequent to God, even if it be the most ancient of all other things, still has only the second place when compared with that omnipotent Being, and appears not so much masculine as feminine, in accordance with its likeness to the other creatures; for as the male always has the precedence, the female falls short, and is inferior in rank.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 78-80, 77 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

77. We will now speak of his wife, Sarah, for she too had her name changed to Sarrah by the addition of the one element, the letter rho. These, then, are the names, and we must now explain what they mean. Sarah, being interpreted, signifies "my authority," but Sarrah signifies "princess;" the former name
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 136-141, 164, 3, 131 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

131. Then, preserving the natural order of things, and having a regard to the connection between what comes afterwards and what has gone before, he says next, "And a fountain went up from the earth and watered the whole face of the earth." For other philosophers affirm that all water is one of the four elements of which the world was composed. But Moses, who was accustomed to contemplate and comprehend matters with a more acute and far-sighted vision, considers thus: the vast sea is an element, being a fourth part of the entire universe, which the men after him denominated the ocean, while they look upon the smaller seas which we sail over in the light of harbours. And he drew a distinction between the sweet and drinkable water and that of the sea, attributing the former to the earth, and considering it a portion of the earth, rather than of the ocean, on account of the reason which I have already mentioned, that is to say, that the earth may be held together by the sweet qualities of the water as by a chain; the water acting in the manner of glue. For if the earth were left entirely dry, so that no moisture arose and penetrated through its holes rising to the surface in various directions, it would split. But now it is held together, and remains lasting, partly by the force of the wind which unites it, and partly because the moisture does not allow it to become dry, and so to be broken up into larger and smaller fragments.
14. Philo of Alexandria, On Planting, 19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 181 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

181. Should I not say to this man, If you have a regard to your own advantage you will destroy everything that is excellent, and that too without deriving any advantage therefrom? You will put an end to the honour due to parents, the attention of a wife, the education of children, the blameless services of servants, the management of a house, the government of a city, the firm establishment of laws, the guardianship of morals, reverence to one's elders, the habit of speaking well of the dead, good fellowship with the living, piety towards God as shown both in words and in deeds: for you are overturning and throwing into confusion all these things, sowing seed for yourself alone, and nursing up pleasure, that gluttonous intemperate origin of all evil. LIV.
16. Philo of Alexandria, On Curses, 119 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

119. And nearly all the troubles, and confusions, and enmities which arise among men, are about absolutely nothing, but about what is really a shadow: for Moses called Tubal the son of Zillah, that is to say of shadow, the maker of the warlike instruments of brass and iron, speaking philosophically, and being guided not by verbal technicalities, but by the exceeding propriety of the names; for he knew that every naval and every land expedition chooses to encounter the greatest dangers for the sake of bodily pleasures, or with a view to obtain a superfluity of external good things, of which nothing is firm or solid, as is testified by the history of time, which brings all things to proof: for they are like superficial sketches, being in themselves perishable and of no duration. XXXV.
17. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 2.277 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.277. But some have not only put themselves forward as rivals to human virtue, but have proceeded to such a pitch of folly as to oppose themselves also to divine virtue. Therefore Pharaoh, the king of the land of Egypt, is spoken of as the leader of the company which is devoted to the passions; for it is said to the prophet, "Behold, he is going forth to the river, and thou shalt stand in the way to meet him, on the bank of the River;
18. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 2.52, 4.102, 4.134 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2.52. In considering the melancholy and fearful condition of the human race, and how full it is of innumerable evils, which the covetousness of the soul begets, which the defects of the body produce, and which all the inequalities of the soul inflict upon us, and which the retaliations of those among whom we live, both doing and suffering innumerable evils, are continually causing us, he then wondered whether any one being tossed about in such a sea of troubles, some brought on deliberately and others unintentionally, and never being able to rest in peace nor to cast anchor in the safe haven of a life free from danger, could by any possibility really keep a feast, not one in name, but one which should really be so, enjoying himself and being happy in the contemplation of the world and all the things in it, and in obedience to nature, and in a perfect harmony between his words and his actions, between his actions and his words. 4.102. at the same time not approving of unnecessary rigour, like the lawgiver of Lacedaemon, nor undue effeminacy, like the man who taught the Ionians and the Sybarites lessons of luxury and license, but keeping a middle path between the two courses, so that he has relaxed what was over strict, and tightened what was too loose, mingling the excesses which are found at each extremity with moderation, which lies between the two, so as to produce an irreproachable harmony and consistency of life, on which account he has laid down not carelessly, but with minute particularity, what we are to use and what to avoid. 4.134. And I mean by this those virtues which are of common utility, for each one of these ten laws separately, and all of them together, train men and encourage them to prudence, and justice, and piety, towards God and all the rest of the company of virtues, connecting sound words with good intentions, and virtuous actions with wise language, that so the organ of the soul may be wholly and entirely held together in a good and harmonious manner so as to produce a well-regulated and faultless innocence and consistency of life.
19. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 10, 100-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-129, 13, 130-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-227, 27-29, 3, 30, 34-39, 4, 40-79, 8, 80-99, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1. Having previously said all that appeared to be necessary about justice, and those precepts which are closely connected with it, I now proceed in regular order to speak of courage, not meaning by courage that warlike and frantic delirium, under the influence of passion as its counsellor, which the generality of men take for it, but knowledge;
20. Philo of Alexandria, Against Flaccus, 71 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

71. and then when they were dead they raged no less against them with interminable hostility, and inflicted still heavier insults on their persons, dragging them, I had almost said, though all the alleys and lanes of the city, until the corpse, being lacerated in all its skin, and flesh, and muscles from the inequality and roughness of the ground, all the previously united portions of his composition being torn asunder and separated from one another, was actually torn to pieces.
21. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.45, 1.56-1.61, 1.63, 1.65-1.73, 1.78, 3.244-3.245 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.45. God therefore sows and implants terrestrial virtue in the human race, being an imitation and representation of the heavenly virtue. For, pitying our race, and seeing that it is exposed to abundant and innumerable evils, he firmly planted terrestrial virtue as an assistant against and warderoff of the diseases of the soul; being, as I have said before, an imitation of the heavenly and archetypal wisdom which he calls by various names. Now virtue is called a paradise metaphorically, and the appropriate place for the paradise is Eden; and this means luxury: and the most appropriate field for virtue is peace, and ease, and joy; in which real luxury especially consists. 1.56. And God caused to rise out of the earth every tree which is pleasant to the sight and good for food, and the tree of life he raised in the middle of the Paradise, and also the tree of the knowledge of good and evil." He here gives a sketch of the trees of virtue which he plants in the soul. And these are the particular virtues, and the energies in accordance with them, and the good and successful actions, and the things which by the philosophers are called fitting; 1.57. these are the plants of the Paradise. Nevertheless, he describes the characteristics of these same trees, showing that that which is desirable to be beheld is likewise most excellent to be enjoyed. For of the arts some are theoretical and not practical, such as geometry and astronomy. Some, again, are practical and not theoretical, such as the art of the architect, of the smith, and all those which are called mechanical arts. But virtue is both theoretical and practical; for it takes in theory, since the road which leads to it is philosophy in three of its parts--the reasoning, and the moral, and the physical part. It also includes action; for virtue is art conversant about the whole of life; and in life all actions are exhibited. 1.58. Still, although it takes in both theory and practice, nevertheless it is most excellent in each particular. For the theory of virtue is thoroughly excellent, and its practice and observation is a worthy object to contend for. On which account Moses says that the tree was pleasant to the sight, which is a symbol of theoretical excellence; and likewise good for food, which is a token of useful and practical good. XVIII. 1.59. But the tree of life is that most general virtue which some people call goodness; from which the particular virtues are derived, and of which they are composed. And it is on this account that it is placed in the centre of the Paradise; having the most comprehensive place of all, in order that, like a king, it may be guarded by the trees on each side of it. But some say that it is the heart that is meant by the tree of life; since that is the cause of life, and since that has its position in the middle of the body, as being, according to them, the domit part of the body. But these men ought to be made aware that they are expounding a doctrine which has more reference to medical than to natural science. But we, as has been said before, affirm that by the tree of life is meant the most general virtue. 1.60. And of this tree Moses expressly says, that it is placed in the middle of the paradise; but as to the other tree, that namely of the knowledge of good and evil, he has not specified whether it is within or outside of the Paradise; but after he has used the following expression, "and the tree of the knowledge of good and evil," he says no more, not mentioning where it is placed, in order that any one who is uninitiated in the principles of natural philosophy, may not be made to marvel at his knowledge. 1.61. What then must we say? That this tree is both in the Paradise and also out of it. As to its essence, indeed, in it; but as to its power, out of it. How so? The domit portion of us is capable of receiving everything, and resembles wax, which is capable of receiving every impression, whether good or bad. In reference to which fact, that supplanter Jacob makes a confession where he says, "all these things were made for Me." For the unspeakable formations and impression of all the things in the universe, are all borne forward into, and comprehended by the soul, which is only one. When, therefore that receives the impression of perfect virtue, it has become the tree of life; but when it has received the impression of vice, it has then become the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, and vice and all evil have been banished from the divine company. Therefore the domit power which has received it is in the Paradise according to its essence; for there is in it that characteristic of virtue, which is akin to the Paradise. But again, according to its power it is not in it, because the form of virtue is inconsistent with the divine operations; 1.63. And a river goes forth out of Eden to water the Paradise. From thence it is separated into four heads: the name of the one is Pheison. That is the one which encircles the whole land of Evilat. There is the country where there is gold, and the gold of that land is good. There also are the carbuncle and the sapphire stone. And the name of the second river is Gihon; this is that which encircles the whole land of Ethiopia. And the third river is the Tigris. This is the river which flows in front of the Assyrians. And the fourth river is the Euphrates." In these words Moses intends to sketch out the particular virtues. And they also are four in number, prudence, temperance, courage, and justice. Now the greatest river from which the four branches flow off, is generic virtue, which we have already called goodness; and the four branches are the same number of virtues. 1.65. Let us examine the expressions of the writer: "A river," says he, "goes forth out of Eden, to water the Paradise." This river is generic goodness; and this issues forth out of the Eden of the wisdom of God, and that is the word of God. For it is according to the word of God, that generic virtue was created. And generic virtue waters the Paradise: that is to say, it waters the particular virtues. But it does not derive its beginnings from any principle of locality, but from a principle of preeminence. For each of the virtues is really and truly a ruler and a queen. And the expression, "is separated," is equivalent to "is marked off by fixed boundaries;" since wisdom appoints them settled limits with reference to what is to be done. Courage with respect to what is to be endured; temperance with reference to what is to be chosen; and justice in respect of what is to be distributed. XX. 1.66. The name of one river is Pheison. This is that river which encircles all the land of Evilat; there is the country where there is gold. And the gold of that land is good; there also are the carbuncle and the sapphire stone." One of the four virtues is prudence, which Moses here calls Pheison: because the soul abstains, from, and guards against, acts of iniquity. And it meanders in a circle, and flows all round the land of Evilat; that is to say, it preserves a mild, and gentle, and favourable constitution. And as of all fusible essences, the most excellent and the most illustrious is gold, so also the virtue of the soul which enjoys the highest reputation, is prudence. 1.67. And when he uses the expression, "that is the country where there is gold," he is not speaking geographically, that is, where gold exists, but that is the country in which that valuable possession exists, brilliant as gold, tried in the fire, and valuable, namely, prudence. And this is confessed to be the most valuable possession of God. But with reference to the geographical position of virtue, there are two personages, each invested with distinctive qualities. One, the being who has prudence, the other, the being who exerts it; and these he likens to the carbuncle and the emerald. XXI. 1.68. And the name of the second river is Gihon. This is that which encircles all the land of Ethiopia." Under the symbol of this river courage is intended. For the name of Gihon being interpreted means chest, or an animal which attacks with its horns; each of which interpretations is emblematical of courage. For courage has its abode about the chest, where also is the seat of the heart, and where man is prepared to defend himself. For courage is the knowledge of what is to be withstood, and of what is not to be withstood, and of what is indifferent. And it encircles and surrounds Ethiopia, making demonstrations of war against it; and the name of Ethiopia, being interpreted, means humiliation. And cowardice is a humiliating thing; but courage is adverse to humiliation and to cowardice. 1.69. And the third river is the Tigris; this is that which flows in front of Assyria." The third virtue is temperance, which resolutely opposes that kind of pleasure which appears to be the directress of human infirmity. For the translation of the name Assyrians in the Greek tongue is euthynontes, (directors). And he has likened desire to a tiger, which is the most untameable of beasts; it being desire about which temperance is conversant. XXII. 1.70. It is worth while therefore to raise the question why courage has been spoken of as the second virtue, and temperance as the third, and prudence as the first; and why Moses has not also explained the course of action of the other virtues. Now we must understand that our soul is divided into three parts, and that it has one portion which is conversant about reason; another which is subject to passion; and another which is that in which the desires are conceived. And we find that the proper place and abode of the reasoning part of the soul, is the head; of the passionate part, the chest; and of the part in which the desires are conceived, the stomach. And we find that appropriate virtues are adapted to each of these parts. To the rational part, prudence; in it is the office of reason, to have a knowledge of what one might, and of what one ought not to do. And the virtue of the passionate part of the soul is courage: and of the appetitive part, temperance. For it is through temperance that we remedy and cure the appetites. 1.71. For as the head is the principle and uppermost part of the animal, and the chest the next highest, and the liver the third, in point both of importance and of position; so in the soul again, the first is the rational part, the second the passionate part, and the third the appetitive part. In the same way again of the virtues; the first is that which is conversant about the first portion of the soul, which is the reasoning portion, and which at the same time has its abode in the head of the body; in short it is prudence. And the second of the virtues is courage, because it is conversant about the second portion of the soul, namely, about passion, and has its abode in the second portion of the body, namely, in the chest. And the third virtue is temperance, which is placed in the stomach which is the third portion of the body, and it is conversant about the appetitive part, which has been allotted the third part of the soul, as being its subject matter. XXIII. 1.72. And the fourth river," continues Moses, "is the river Euphrates." And this name Euphrates means fertility; and symbolically taken, it is the fourth virtue, namely, justice, which is most truly a productive virtue, and one which gladdens the intellect. When therefore does this happen? When the three parts of the soul are all in harmony with one another; and harmony among them is in reality the predomice of the most important; as for instance, when the two inferior parts, the passionate and the appetitive part, are disposed to yield to the superior part, then justice exists. For it is just that the better portion should rule at all times, and in all places, and that the inferior part should be ruled. Now the rational part is the better part, and the appetitive and the passionate parts are the inferior ones. 1.73. But when, on the contrary, passion and appetite get riotous and disobey the reins, and by the violence of their impetuosity throw off and disregard the charioteer, that is to say reason, and when each of these passions get hold of the reins themselves, then there is injustice. For it is inevitable, that through any ignorance or vice of the charioteer, the chariot must be borne down over precipices, and must fall into the abyss; just as it must be saved when the charioteer is endowed with skill and virtue. XXIV. 1.78. And the gold of that land is good." Is there, then, any other gold which is not good? Beyond all doubt; for the nature of prudence is twofold, there being one prudence general, and another particular. Therefore, the prudence that is in me, being particular prudence, is not good; for when I perish that also will perish together with me; but general or universal prudence, the abode of which is the wisdom of God and the house of God, is good; for it is imperishable itself, and dwells in an imperishable habitation. XXVI.
22. Anon., 4 Ezra, 8.44-8.45

8.44. But man, who has been formed by thy hands and is called thy own image because he is made like thee, and for whose sake thou hast formed all things -- hast thou also made him like the farmer's seed? 8.45. No, O Lord who art over us! But spare thy people and have mercy on thy inheritance, for thou hast mercy on thy own creation.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 358
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 358, 402
allegory/allegoresis, pedagogical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
allegory/allegoresis Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275
allegory Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 79
aristotle Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275, 358; Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 87
body Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275; Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 87
caleb Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 358
chaeremon the stoic, on the egyptian priests Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 205
clay Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
corruptible Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
creation topoi Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 79, 109
creature, of dust Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
creature of clay Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
demiurgical logos Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 264
divine, image Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
dust Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
earth, born Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 79
earth Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
eden Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 390
esoteric tradition Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 264
etymology, hebrew Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
exposition of the law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402
gender, symbolism Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 264
guilty Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
hagar Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277, 402
heavenly person Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 79
historiography, roman Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 390
holy, holiness Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 87
hoshea Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 358
human, nature Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
hypostasis Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 264
image of god Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
imago dei Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 79
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402
israel, nation/people Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
jewish wisdom Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 264
joshua Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 358
judgment Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
justice Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 79, 109
liminality Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 87
logos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 358
merciful Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
mind Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 87
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 358
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275, 277, 358
nature, human Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
peace, beneficial Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 390
perfection Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275
philo judaeus Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 390
physical Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
piety Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275, 358
pleasure Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 390
potter Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
preliminary studies Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402
qge Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402
responsibility Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 402
righteous, the Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
sarah Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277, 402
self-mastery Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 79, 109
septuagint Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 390
sexual (gendered) Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 264
sovereign Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
sovereign knowledge Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
spirit Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
symbolism, mythopoetic Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 264
symbolism Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 264
toil Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 390
topoi, creation Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 79, 109
vessels Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 109
virtue, cardinal Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275, 402
virtue, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275
virtue, specific/generic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275, 277
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277, 358, 402; Gorman, Gorman, Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature (2014) 390; Putthoff, Ontological Aspects of Early Jewish Anthropology (2016) 87
virtues Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 79
wisdom' Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 275
wisdom Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 277