Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9247
Philo Of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.32


nanAnd we must consider that the man who was formed of earth, means the mind which is to be infused into the body, but which has not yet been so infused. And this mind would be really earthly and corruptible, if it were not that God had breathed into it the spirit of genuine life; for then it "exists," and is no longer made into a soul; and its soul is not inactive, and incapable of proper formation, but a really intellectual and living one. "For man," says Moses, "became a living soul." XIII.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

42 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Deuteronomy, 30.12-30.14 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

30.12. לֹא בַשָּׁמַיִם הִוא לֵאמֹר מִי יַעֲלֶה־לָּנוּ הַשָּׁמַיְמָה וְיִקָּחֶהָ לָּנוּ וְיַשְׁמִעֵנוּ אֹתָהּ וְנַעֲשֶׂנָּה׃ 30.13. וְלֹא־מֵעֵבֶר לַיָּם הִוא לֵאמֹר מִי יַעֲבָר־לָנוּ אֶל־עֵבֶר הַיָּם וְיִקָּחֶהָ לָּנוּ וְיַשְׁמִעֵנוּ אֹתָהּ וְנַעֲשֶׂנָּה׃ 30.14. כִּי־קָרוֹב אֵלֶיךָ הַדָּבָר מְאֹד בְּפִיךָ וּבִלְבָבְךָ לַעֲשֹׂתוֹ׃ 30.12. It is not in heaven, that thou shouldest say: ‘Who shall go up for us to heaven, and bring it unto us, and make us to hear it, that we may do it?’" 30.13. Neither is it beyond the sea, that thou shouldest say: ‘Who shall go over the sea for us, and bring it unto us, and make us to hear it, that we may do it?’" 30.14. But the word is very nigh unto thee, in thy mouth, and in thy heart, that thou mayest do it."
2. Hebrew Bible, Exodus, a b c d\n0 "15.25" "15.25" "15 25" (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

3. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, a b c d\n0 "1.26" "1.26" "1 26" \n1 "2.7" "2.7" "2 7" \n2 "5.24" "5.24" "5 24" \n3 1.23 1.23 1 23 \n4 1.26 1.26 1 26 \n5 1.27 1.27 1 27 \n6 1.28 1.28 1 28 \n7 2 2 2 None\n8 2.19 2.19 2 19 \n9 2.7 2.7 2 7 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4. Hebrew Bible, Leviticus, 5.6-5.17 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5.6. וְהֵבִיא אֶת־אֲשָׁמוֹ לַיהוָה עַל חַטָּאתוֹ אֲשֶׁר חָטָא נְקֵבָה מִן־הַצֹּאן כִּשְׂבָּה אוֹ־שְׂעִירַת עִזִּים לְחַטָּאת וְכִפֶּר עָלָיו הַכֹּהֵן מֵחַטָּאתוֹ׃ 5.7. וְאִם־לֹא תַגִּיע יָדוֹ דֵּי שֶׂה וְהֵבִיא אֶת־אֲשָׁמוֹ אֲשֶׁר חָטָא שְׁתֵּי תֹרִים אוֹ־שְׁנֵי בְנֵי־יוֹנָה לַיהוָה אֶחָד לְחַטָּאת וְאֶחָד לְעֹלָה׃ 5.8. וְהֵבִיא אֹתָם אֶל־הַכֹּהֵן וְהִקְרִיב אֶת־אֲשֶׁר לַחַטָּאת רִאשׁוֹנָה וּמָלַק אֶת־רֹאשׁוֹ מִמּוּל עָרְפּוֹ וְלֹא יַבְדִּיל׃ 5.9. וְהִזָּה מִדַּם הַחַטָּאת עַל־קִיר הַמִּזְבֵּחַ וְהַנִּשְׁאָר בַּדָּם יִמָּצֵה אֶל־יְסוֹד הַמִּזְבֵּחַ חַטָּאת הוּא׃ 5.11. וְאִם־לֹא תַשִּׂיג יָדוֹ לִשְׁתֵּי תֹרִים אוֹ לִשְׁנֵי בְנֵי־יוֹנָה וְהֵבִיא אֶת־קָרְבָּנוֹ אֲשֶׁר חָטָא עֲשִׂירִת הָאֵפָה סֹלֶת לְחַטָּאת לֹא־יָשִׂים עָלֶיהָ שֶׁמֶן וְלֹא־יִתֵּן עָלֶיהָ לְבֹנָה כִּי חַטָּאת הִיא׃ 5.12. וֶהֱבִיאָהּ אֶל־הַכֹּהֵן וְקָמַץ הַכֹּהֵן מִמֶּנָּה מְלוֹא קֻמְצוֹ אֶת־אַזְכָּרָתָה וְהִקְטִיר הַמִּזְבֵּחָה עַל אִשֵּׁי יְהוָה חַטָּאת הִוא׃ 5.13. וְכִפֶּר עָלָיו הַכֹּהֵן עַל־חַטָּאתוֹ אֲשֶׁר־חָטָא מֵאַחַת מֵאֵלֶּה וְנִסְלַח לוֹ וְהָיְתָה לַכֹּהֵן כַּמִּנְחָה׃ 5.14. וַיְדַבֵּר יְהוָה אֶל־מֹשֶׁה לֵּאמֹר׃ 5.15. נֶפֶשׁ כִּי־תִמְעֹל מַעַל וְחָטְאָה בִּשְׁגָגָה מִקָּדְשֵׁי יְהוָה וְהֵבִיא אֶת־אֲשָׁמוֹ לַיהוָה אַיִל תָּמִים מִן־הַצֹּאן בְּעֶרְכְּךָ כֶּסֶף־שְׁקָלִים בְּשֶׁקֶל־הַקֹּדֶשׁ לְאָשָׁם׃ 5.16. וְאֵת אֲשֶׁר חָטָא מִן־הַקֹּדֶשׁ יְשַׁלֵּם וְאֶת־חֲמִישִׁתוֹ יוֹסֵף עָלָיו וְנָתַן אֹתוֹ לַכֹּהֵן וְהַכֹּהֵן יְכַפֵּר עָלָיו בְּאֵיל הָאָשָׁם וְנִסְלַח לוֹ׃ 5.17. וְאִם־נֶפֶשׁ כִּי תֶחֱטָא וְעָשְׂתָה אַחַת מִכָּל־מִצְוֺת יְהוָה אֲשֶׁר לֹא תֵעָשֶׂינָה וְלֹא־יָדַע וְאָשֵׁם וְנָשָׂא עֲוֺנוֹ׃ 5.6. and he shall bring his forfeit unto the LORD for his sin which he hath sinned, a female from the flock, a lamb or a goat, for a sin-offering; and the priest shall make atonement for him as concerning his sin." 5.7. And if his means suffice not for a lamb, then he shall bring his forfeit for that wherein he hath sinned, two turtle-doves, or two young pigeons, unto the LORD: one for a sin-offering, and the other for a burnt-offering." 5.8. And he shall bring them unto the priest, who shall offer that which is for the sin-offering first, and pinch off its head close by its neck, but shall not divide it asunder." 5.9. And he shall sprinkle of the blood of the sin-offering upon the side of the altar; and the rest of the blood shall be drained out at the base of the altar; it is a sin-offering." 5.10. And he shall prepare the second for a burnt-offering, according to the ordice; and the priest shall make atonement for him as concerning his sin which he hath sinned, and he shall be forgiven." 5.11. But if his means suffice not for two turtledoves, or two young pigeons, then he shall bring his offering for that wherein he hath sinned, the tenth part of an ephah of fine flour for a sin-offering; he shall put no oil upon it, neither shall he put any frankincense thereon; for it is a sin-offering." 5.12. And he shall bring it to the priest, and the priest shall take his handful of it as the memorial-part thereof, and make it smoke on the altar, upon the offerings of the LORD made by fire; it is a sin-offering." 5.13. And the priest shall make atonement for him as touching his sin that he hath sinned in any of these things, and he shall be forgiven; and the remt shall be the priest’s, as the meal-offering." 5.14. And the LORD spoke unto Moses, saying:" 5.15. If any one commit a trespass, and sin through error, in the holy things of the LORD, then he shall bring his forfeit unto the LORD, a ram without blemish out of the flock, according to thy valuation in silver by shekels, after the shekel of the sanctuary, for a guilt-offering." 5.16. And he shall make restitution for that which he hath done amiss in the holy thing, and shall add the fifth part thereto, and give it unto the priest; and the priest shall make atonement for him with the ram of the guilt-offering, and he shall be forgiven." 5.17. And if any one sin, and do any of the things which the LORD hath commanded not to be done, though he know it not, yet is he guilty, and shall bear his iniquity."
5. Hebrew Bible, Ezekiel, 37 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Plato, Phaedo, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

114d. Now it would not be fitting for a man of sense to maintain that all this is just as I have described it, but that this or something like it is true concerning our souls and their abodes, since the soul is shown to be immortal, I think he may properly and worthily venture to believe; for the venture is well worth while; and he ought to repeat such things to himself as if they were magic charms, which is the reason why I have been lengthening out the story so long. This then is why a man should be of good cheer about his soul, who in his life
7. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

246c. and fully winged, it mounts upward and governs the whole world; but the soul which has lost its wings is borne along until it gets hold of something solid, when it settles down, taking upon itself an earthly body, which seems to be self-moving, because of the power of the soul within it; and the whole, compounded of soul and body, is called a living being, and is further designated as mortal. It is not immortal by any reasonable supposition, but we, though we have never seen
8. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

9. Dead Sea Scrolls, Community Rule, 3.14-3.21 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Septuagint, Ecclesiasticus (Siracides), 24.22-24.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

24.22. Whoever obeys me will not be put to shame,and those who work with my help will not sin. 24.23. All this is the book of the covet of the Most High God,the law which Moses commanded us as an inheritance for the congregations of Jacob.
11. Septuagint, Wisdom of Solomon, 9.15 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.15. for a perishable body weighs down the soul,and this earthy tent burdens the thoughtful mind.
12. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Abraham, 6, 66-67, 84, 271 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

271. Those men, therefore, who have spent a long life in that existence which is in accordance with the body, apart from all virtue, we must call only long-lived children, having never been instructed in those branches of education which befit grey hairs. But the man who has been a lover of prudence, and wisdom, and faith in God, one may justly denominate an elder, forming his name by a slight change from the first.
13. Philo of Alexandria, On The Eternity of The World, 135, 134 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

134. And these men appear to be ignorant of the manner in which they are produced, since if they had not been, perhaps they would have been silent out of shame; but still there is no reason why we should not teach them; but there is nothing new in what is now said, neither are they our words but the ancient sayings of wise men, by whom nothing which was necessary for knowledge has been left uninvestigated;
14. Philo of Alexandria, On Husbandry, 97, 96 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

96. And these things thus expressed resemble visions and prodigies; I mean the account of one dragon uttering the voice of a man and pouring his sophistries into most innocent dispositions, and deceiving the woman with plausible arguments of persuasion; and of another becoming a cause of complete safety to those who looked upon it.
15. Philo of Alexandria, On The Confusion of Tongues, 41, 146 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

146. And even if there be not as yet any one who is worthy to be called a son of God, nevertheless let him labour earnestly to be adorned according to his first-born word, the eldest of his angels, as the great archangel of many names; for he is called, the authority, and the name of God, and the Word, and man according to God's image, and he who sees Israel.
16. Philo of Alexandria, On Flight And Finding, 60-61, 68-71, 58 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

58. She also confirmed her statement by another passage in scripture of the following purport: "Behold, I have set before thy face life and death, and good and Evil." Therefore, O all-wise man, good and virtue mean life, and evil and wickedness mean death. And in another passage we read, "This is thy life, and thy length of days, to love the Lord thy God." This is the most admirable definition of immortal life, to be occupied by a love and affection for God unembarrassed by any connection with the flesh or with the body.
17. Philo of Alexandria, On The Migration of Abraham, 177-195, 176 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

176. And "Abraham," says Moses, "was seventy-five years of age, when he departed out of Charren." Now concerning the number of seventy-five years (for this contains a calculation corresponding to what has been previously advanced,) we will enter into an accurate examination hereafter. But first of all we will examine what Charran is, and what is meant by the departure from this country to go and live in another.
18. Philo of Alexandria, On The Change of Names, 18, 213, 228, 27-31, 33-38, 54, 56, 143 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

143. and to those who ask, whether she who is barren has an offspring (for the holy scriptures, which some time ago represented Sarrah as barren, now confess that she will become a mother); this answer must be given, that a woman who is barren cannot, in the course of nature, bring forth an offspring, just as a blind man cannot see, nor a deaf man hear; but that the soul, which is barren of bad things, and which is unproductive of immoderate license of the passions and vices, is alone very nearly attaining to a happy delivery, bringing forth objects worthy of love, namely, the number seven, according to the hymn which is sung by Grace, that is, by Hannah, who says, "she who was barren hath born seven, and she who had many children has become weak:
19. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 169, 172, 30, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 77, "69" (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

20. Philo of Alexandria, On The Posterity of Cain, 9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. and all those who of necessity have endured this fate, being weighed down by the might of irresistible and implacable power, are objects rather for pity than for hatred; but all those who voluntarily and of deliberated purposes have rejected the living God, exceeding even the bounds of wickedness itself, for what other evil of equal weight can possibly be found? Such men should suffer not the usual punishments of evil doers, but something new and extraordinary. And surely no one could invent a more novel or more terrible penalty than a departure and flight from the presence of the Ruler of the universe. III.
21. Philo of Alexandria, On Dreams, 1.34, 2.70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.34. For among created things, the heaven is holy in the world, in accordance with which body, the imperishable and indestructible natures revolve; and in man the mind is holy, being a sort of fragment of the Deity, and especially according to the statement of Moses, who says, "God breathed into his face the breath of life, and man became a living Soul. 2.70. Dost thou not see that the earthly mass, Adam, when it lays its hands upon the two trees, dies, because it has preferred the number two to the unit, and because it has admired the creature in preference to the Creator? But do thou go forth beyond the reach of the smoke and the tempest, and flee from the ridiculous pursuits of mortal life as a fearful whirlpool, and do not, as the proverb has it, touch them even with the tip of thy finger.
22. Philo of Alexandria, On The Special Laws, 1.345 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.345. But we who are the followers and disciples of the prophet Moses, will never abandon our investigation into the nature of the true God; looking upon the knowledge of him as the true end of happiness; and thinking that the true everlasting life, as the law says, {49}{#de 4:4.} is to live in obedience to and worship of God; in which precept it gives us a most important and philosophical lesson; for in real truth those who are atheists are dead as to their souls, but those who are marshalled in the ranks of the true living God, as his servants, enjoy an everlasting Life.{50}{yonge's translation includes a separate treatise title at this point: On the Commandment that the Wages of a Harlot Are Not To Be Received in the Sacred Treasury.
23. Philo of Alexandria, On The Virtues, 204-205, 177 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

177. For absolutely never to do anything wrong at all is a peculiar attribute of God, and perhaps one may also say of a God-like man. But when one has erred, then to change so as to adopt a blameless course of life for the future is the part of a wise man, and of one who is not altogether ignorant of what is expedient.
24. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 20, 13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Then, because of their anxious desire for an immortal and blessed existence, thinking that their mortal life has already come to an end, they leave their possessions to their sons or daughters, or perhaps to other relations, giving them up their inheritance with willing cheerfulness; and those who know no relations give their property to their companions or friends, for it followed of necessity that those who have acquired the wealth which sees, as if ready prepared for them, should be willing to surrender that wealth which is blind to those who themselves also are still blind in their minds.
25. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Moses, a b c d\n0 "2.188" "2.188" "2 188" (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

26. Philo of Alexandria, On The Embassy To Gaius, 192 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

192. And even if we were allowed free access to him, what else could we expect but an inexorable sentence of death? But be it so; we will perish. For, indeed, a glorious death in defence of and for the sake of the preservation of our laws, is a kind of life. "But, indeed, if no advantage is derived from our death, would it not be insanity to perish in addition to what we now have to endure, and this too, while we appear to be ambassadors, so that the calamity appears rather to affect those who have sent us than those who remain?
27. Philo of Alexandria, Allegorical Interpretation, 1.31, 1.33-1.43, 1.90, 1.106, 2.4-2.5, 2.14-2.15, 2.24, 3.18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.31. And God created man, taking a lump of clay from the earth, and breathed into his face the breath of life: and man became a living soul." The races of men are twofold; for one is the heavenly man, and the other the earthly man. Now the heavenly man, as being born in the image of God, has no participation in any corruptible or earthlike essence. But the earthly man is made of loose material, which he calls a lump of clay. On which account he says, not that the heavenly man was made, but that he was fashioned according to the image of God; but the earthly man he calls a thing made, and not begotten by the maker. 1.33. But some one may ask, why God thought an earth-born mind, which was wholly devoted to the body, worthy of divine inspiration, and yet did not treat the one made after his own idea and image in the same manner. In the second place he may ask, what is the meaning of the expression "breathed into." And thirdly, why he breathed into his face: fourthly also, why, since he knew the name of the Spirit when he says, "And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the Waters," he now speaks of breath, and not of the Spirit. 1.34. Now in reply to the first question we must say this one thing; God being very munificent gives his good things to all men, even to those who are not perfect; inviting them to a participation and rivalry in virtue, and at the same time displaying his abundant riches, and showing that it is sufficient for those also who will not be greatly benefited by it; and he also shows this in the most evident manner possible in other cases; for when he rains on the sea, and when he raises up fountains in desert places, and waters shallow and rough and unproductive land, making the rivers to overflow with floods, what else is he doing but displaying the great abundance of his riches and of his goodness? This is the cause why he has created no soul in such a condition as to be wholly barren of good, even if the employment of that good be beyond the reach of some people. 1.35. We must also give a second reason, which is this: Moses wished to represent all the actions of the Deity as just--therefore a man who had not had a real life breathed into him, but who was ignorant of virtue, when he was chastised for the sins which he had committed would say that he was punished unjustly, in that it was only through ignorance of what was good that he had erred respecting it; and that he was to blame who had not breathed any proper wisdom into him; and perhaps he will even say, that he has absolutely committed no offence whatever; since some people affirm that actions done involuntarily and in ignorance have not the nature of offences. 1.36. Now the expression "breathed into" is equivalent to "inspired," or "gave life to" things iimate: for let us take care that we are never filled with such absurdity as to think that God employs the organs of the mouth or nostrils for the purpose of breathing into anything; for God is not only devoid of peculiar qualities, but he is likewise not of the form of man, and the use of these words shows some more secret mystery of nature; 1.37. for there must be three things, that which breathes in, that which receives what is breathed in, and that which is breathed in. Now that which breathes in is God, that which receives what is breathed in is the mind, and that which is breathed in is the spirit. What then is collected from these three things? A union of the three takes place, through God extending the power, which proceeds from himself through the spirit, which is the middle term, as far as the subject. Why does he do this, except that we may thus derive a proper notion of him? 1.38. Since how could the soul have perceived God if he had not inspired it, and touched it according to his power? For human intellect would not have dared to mount up to such a height as to lay claim to the nature of God, if God himself had not drawn it up to himself, as far as it was possible for the mind of man to be drawn up, and if he had not formed it according to those powers which can be comprehended. 1.39. And God breathed into man's face both physically and morally. Physically, when he placed the senses in the face: and this portion of the body above all others is vivified and inspired; and morally, in this manner, as the face is the domit portion of the body, so also is the mind the domit portion of the soul. It is into this alone that God breathes; but the other parts, the sensations, the power of speech, and the power of generation, he does not think worthy of his breath, for they are inferior in power. 1.40. By what then were these subordinate parts inspired? beyond all question by the mind; for of the qualities which the mind has received form God, it gives a share to the irrational portion of the soul, so that the mind is vivified by God, and the irrational part of the soul by the mind; for the mind is as it were a god to the irrational part of the soul, for which reason Moses did not hesitate to call it "the god of Pharaoh. 1.41. For of all created things some are created by God, and through him: some not indeed by God, but yet through him: and the rest have their existence both by him and through him. At all events Moses as he proceeds says, that God planted a paradise, and among the best things as made both by God and through God, is the mind. But the irrational part of the soul was made indeed by God but not through God, but through the reasoning power which bears rule and sovereignty in the soul; 1.42. and Moses has used the word "breath," not "spirit," as there is a difference between the two words; for spirit is conceived of according to strength, and intensity, and power; but breath is a gentle and moderate kind of breeze and exhalation; therefore the mind, which was created in accordance with the image and idea of God, may be justly said to partake in his spirit, for its reasoning has strength: but that which is derived from matter is only a partaker in a thin and very light air, being as it were a sort of exhalation, such as arises from spices; for they, although they be preserved intact, and are not exposed to fire or fumigation, do nevertheless emit a certain fragrance. XIV. 1.43. And God planted a paradise in Eden, in the east: and there he placed the man whom he had Formed:" for he called that divine and heavenly wisdom by many names; and he made it manifest that it had many appellations; for he called it the beginning, and the image, and the sight of God. And now he exhibits the wisdom which is conversant about the things of the earth (as being an imitation of this archetypal wisdom), in the plantation of this Paradise. For let not such impiety ever occupy our thoughts as for us to suppose that God cultivates the land and plants paradises, since if we were to do so, we should be presently raising the question of why he does so: for it could not be that he might provide himself with pleasant places of recreation and pastime, or with amusement. 1.90. And the Lord God commanded Adam, saying, of every tree that is in the Paradise thou mayest freely eat; but of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil ye shall not eat; but in the day on which ye eat of it ye shall die the death." A question may arise here to what kind of Adam he gave this command and who, this Adam was. For Moses has not made any mention of him before; but now is the first time that he has named him. Are we then to think that he is desirous to supply you with the name of the factitious man? "And he calls him," continues Moses, "Earth." For this is the interpretation of the name of Adam. Accordingly, when you hear the name Adam, you must think that he is an earthly and perishable being; for he is made according to an image, being not earthly but heavenly. 1.106. and consequently God calls that not merely "to die," but "to die the death;" showing that he is speaking not of common death, but of that peculiar and especial death which is the death of the soul, buried in its passions and in all kinds of evil. And we may almost say that one kind of death is opposed to the other kind. For the one is the separation of what was previously existing in combination, namely, of body and soul. But this other death, on the contrary, is a combination of them both, the inferior one, the body, having the predomice, and the superior one, the soul, being made subject to it.
28. Philo of Alexandria, Questions On Genesis, 1.51 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

29. Philo of Alexandria, Who Is The Heir, 172, 292, 54, 57, 62-64, 171 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

171. The fifth commandment is about the honour due to parents. For this also is a sacred command; having reference not to men, but to him who is the cause of birth and existence of the universe, in accordance with whom it is that fathers and mothers appear to generate children; not generating them themselves, but only being the instruments of generation in his hands.
30. Philo of Alexandria, That The Worse Attacks The Better, 120, 161-162, 84, 119 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

119. But to the impious Cain, neither does the earth contribute anything to give him vigour, even though he never concerns himself about anything which is exterior to it; on which account, in the next sentence, he is found "groaning and trembling upon the Earth," that is to say, under the influence of grief and terror; and such also is the miserable life of a wicked man, who has received for his inheritance the most painful of the four passions, pain and terror; the one being equivalent to groaning, and the other to trembling; for it is inevitable, that some evil should either be present to or impending over such a man. Now the expectation of impending evil causes fear, but the suffering of present evil causes pain.
31. Philo of Alexandria, Plant., 19-20, 22-25, 27-28, 36-37, 39-40, 43, 18 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

18. But the others who say that our mind is a portion of the ethereal nature, have by this assertion attributed to man a kindred with the air; but the great Moses has not named the species of the rational soul by a title resembling that of any created being, but has pronounced it an image of the divine and invisible being, making it a coin as it were of sterling metal, stamped and impressed with the seal of God, the impression of which is the eternal word.
32. New Testament, 1 Corinthians, 15.35-15.58 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15.35. But someone will say, "Howare the dead raised?" and, "With what kind of body do they come? 15.36. You foolish one, that which you yourself sow is not made aliveunless it dies. 15.37. That which you sow, you don't sow the body thatwill be, but a bare grain, maybe of wheat, or of some other kind. 15.38. But God gives it a body even as it pleased him, and to eachseed a body of its own. 15.39. All flesh is not the same flesh, butthere is one flesh of men, another flesh of animals, another of fish,and another of birds. 15.40. There are also celestial bodies, andterrestrial bodies; but the glory of the celestial differs from that ofthe terrestrial. 15.41. There is one glory of the sun, another gloryof the moon, and another glory of the stars; for one star differs fromanother star in glory. 15.42. So also is the resurrection of the dead.It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption. 15.43. It issown in dishonor; it is raised in glory. It is sown in weakness; it israised in power. 15.44. It is sown a natural body; it is raised aspiritual body. There is a natural body and there is also a spiritualbody. 15.45. So also it is written, "The first man, Adam, became a livingsoul." The last Adam became a life-giving spirit. 15.46. However thatwhich is spiritual isn't first, but that which is natural, then thatwhich is spiritual. 15.47. The first man is of the earth, made ofdust. The second man is the Lord from heaven. 15.48. As is the onemade of dust, such are those who are also made of dust; and as is theheavenly, such are they also that are heavenly. 15.49. As we haveborne the image of those made of dust, let's also bear the image of theheavenly. 15.50. Now I say this, brothers, that flesh and blood can'tinherit the Kingdom of God; neither does corruption inheritincorruption. 15.51. Behold, I tell you a mystery. We will not all sleep, but wewill all be changed 15.52. in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye,at the last trumpet. For the trumpet will sound, and the dead will beraised incorruptible, and we will be changed. 15.53. For thiscorruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal must put onimmortality. 15.54. But when this corruptible will have put onincorruption, and this mortal will have put on immortality, then whatis written will happen: "Death is swallowed up in victory. 15.55. Death, where is your sting?Hades, where is your victory? 15.56. The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law. 15.57. But thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our LordJesus Christ. 15.58. Therefore, my beloved brothers, be steadfast,immovable, always abounding in the Lord's work, because you know thatyour labor is not in vain in the Lord.
33. New Testament, 2 Corinthians, 4.17, 5.1, 5.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

34. New Testament, Colossians, 3.1-3.5 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.1. If then you were raised together with Christ, seek the things that are above, where Christ is, seated on the right hand of God. 3.2. Set your mind on the things that are above, not on the things that are on the earth. 3.3. For you died, and your life is hidden with Christ in God. 3.4. When Christ, our life, is revealed, then you will also be revealed with him in glory. 3.5. Put to death therefore your members which are on the earth: sexual immorality, uncleanness, depraved passion, evil desire, and covetousness, which is idolatry;
35. New Testament, Philippians, 3.21 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.21. who will change the body of our humiliation to be conformed to the body of his glory, according to the working by which he is able even to subject all things to himself.
36. New Testament, Romans, 8.10-8.13, 8.23, 13.8-13.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8.10. If Christ is in you, the body is dead because of sin, but the spirit is alive because of righteousness. 8.11. But if the Spirit of him who raised up Jesus from the dead dwells in you, he who raised up Christ Jesus from the dead will also give life to your mortal bodies through his Spirit who dwells in you. 8.12. So then, brothers, we are debtors, not to the flesh, to live after the flesh. 8.13. For if you live after the flesh, you must die; but if by the Spirit you put to death the deeds of the body, you will live. 8.23. Not only so, but ourselves also, who have the first fruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for adoption, the redemption of our body. 13.8. Owe no one anything, except to love one another; for he who loves his neighbor has fulfilled the law. 13.9. For the commandments, "You shall not commit adultery," "You shall not murder," "You shall not steal," "You shall not give false testimony," "You shall not covet," and whatever other commandments there are, are all summed up in this saying, namely, "You shall love your neighbor as yourself. 13.10. Love doesn't harm a neighbor. Love therefore is the fulfillment of the law.
37. New Testament, John, 3.6, 3.12-3.13 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3.6. That which is born of the flesh is flesh. That which is born of the Spirit is spirit. 3.12. If I told you earthly things and you don't believe, how will you believe if I tell you heavenly things? 3.13. No one has ascended into heaven, but he who descended out of heaven, the Son of Man, who is in heaven.
38. New Testament, Mark, 12.28-12.34 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.28. One of the scribes came, and heard them questioning together. Knowing that he had answered them well, asked him, "Which commandment is the greatest of all? 12.29. Jesus answered, "The greatest is, 'Hear, Israel, the Lord our God, the Lord is one: 12.30. you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength.' This is the first commandment. 12.31. The second is like this, 'You shall love your neighbor as yourself.' There is no other commandment greater than these. 12.32. The scribe said to him, "Truly, teacher, you have said well that he is one, and there is none other but he 12.33. and to love him with all the heart, and with all the understanding, with all the soul, and with all the strength, and to love his neighbor as himself, is more important than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices. 12.34. When Jesus saw that he answered wisely, he said to him, "You are not far from the Kingdom of God."No one dared ask him any question after that.
39. Anon., Genesis Rabba, 14.8 (2nd cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

14.8. מִן הָאֲדָמָה (בראשית ב, ז), רַבִּי בֶּרֶכְיָה וְרַבִּי חֶלְבּוֹ בְּשֵׁם רַבִּי שְׁמוּאֵל בַּר נַחְמָן אָמְרוּ, מִמָּקוֹם כַּפָּרָתוֹ נִבְרָא, הֵיךְ מָה דְאַתְּ אָמַר (שמות כ, כז): מִזְבַּח אֲדָמָה תַּעֲשֶׂה לִּי, אָמַר הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא הֲרֵי אֲנִי בּוֹרֵא אוֹתוֹ מִמְּקוֹם כַּפָּרָתוֹ וְהַלְּוַאי יַעֲמֹד. וַיִּפַּח בְּאַפָּיו (בראשית ב, ז), מְלַמֵּד שֶׁהֶעֱמִידוֹ גֹּלֶם מִן הָאָרֶץ וְעַד הָרָקִיעַ, וְזָרַק בּוֹ אֶת הַנְּשָׁמָה, לְפִי שֶׁבָּעוֹלָם הַזֶּה בִּנְפִיחָה, לְפִיכָךְ מֵת, אֲבָל לֶעָתִיד בִּנְתִינָה, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (יחזקאל לז, יד): וְנָתַתִּי רוּחִי בָּכֶם וִחְיִיתֶם. 14.8. ... ‘And He blew into his nostrils’—This teaches that He stood him up as a golem stretching from earth to the firmament and then threw breath/n’shamah into him."
40. Justin, First Apology, 26.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

41. Tertullian, On The Soul, 50 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

42. Zoroastrian Literature, Yasna, 30.4



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abram/abraham, and socrates (terah) Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 227
abram/abraham, covenant with Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 217
abram/abraham, fall Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 227, 229
abram/abraham, gods human being Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 365
abram/abraham, merit of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 217, 229
abram/abraham, migration Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 217
abram/abraham, perfection Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 212
abram/abraham, prayer for ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 535, 537
abram/abraham Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 183, 193, 212
adam Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
allegorical commentary Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 186, 217, 227, 362, 368, 535; Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
allegory/allegoresis, cosmological Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 186
allegory/allegoresis, ethical/moral Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 180, 183
allegory/allegoresis, of the soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 217
allegory/allegoresis, trigger words Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 227
allegory/allegoresis Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 179, 180
allegory Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
anthropogony Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 291
apocalypticism, and philosophy Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 219
aporiae Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 537
aristobulus Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 268
aristotle Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 220
arithmology, five Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 193
arithmology, one Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 183
asceticism Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246
asher, j. Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 219
blood Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246
body, views of Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 132
body Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 183, 186, 212; Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 284, 285, 291; Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
breath, as holy spirit Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 291
breath, as pneuma Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 284, 291
breath Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 284, 285, 291
caleb Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 362
chaldaeans, philos understanding of Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 216
clay Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
community Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 291
covenant Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 217
creation Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13; Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246
creation topoi Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
creator Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246
cycle, patriarchal, abrahamic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 183, 186
death Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
delphi Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
demiurge Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
dillon, j. Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 216
divine, breath Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
divine, image Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
dreams Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
dualism Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
emotions, bad Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 229
emotions, good Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 212
enoch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 183, 193
eschatology Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 183
etymology, greek Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 179, 180
euphrates Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
exposition of the law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 535
fall, epistemic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 227, 229
fall Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 212
flesh Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
furnish, v. p. Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 216
gap Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
geography, problems of Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
geography Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
gnostic, gnosticism Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
god, creating/creativity of Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
god, ungenerated Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 126
god, who is Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 126
god Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13; Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246
grace Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 179, 183, 217
greek logos Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 74
ground, from the Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
heavenly person Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
herodotus Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
hexameter Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 193
homer Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 180, 537
horsley, r. Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 219
human, primal Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
human/humankind Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
image (εἰκών) Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
image of god Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
immortality Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
inspiration Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
intellect (nous) Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 284, 285
isaac Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 535
ishmael Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 535
israel, nation/people Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 365, 535
israel, twelve tribes of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 365
jacob Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 362
jew/jewish, literature/ authors Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
john, fourth gospel Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
joy Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 212, 217
judaism, rabbinic Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 217
judaism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 193, 217
judaism and christianity Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 132
justice Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
kosmos Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 285
law, god's" '151.0_387.0@life, concept of Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
law Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 535
lawgiver Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 186, 365, 368
levison, j. r. Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 216
life, likeness Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
life, of virtue Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
life, true Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246
life Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246
literal sense Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
literature Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
logos, christological Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
logos Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 179, 186, 193, 368
many-named Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 365, 368
middle-platonism Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 74
mind, flight of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 126
miracle Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
moses, as author Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 365
moses, gods human being Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 179, 186, 365
moses Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 179, 183, 365, 368, 535
myth, in the bible Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
myth of er, nature (physis) Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 284, 285
myth of er, of the gods Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 284
names, change of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 362, 365, 368
nothingness Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 227
offering, sin Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 535, 537
paradise Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
parts Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 285, 291
paul, saint Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 285, 291
pentateuch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 365
perfection Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 217, 362, 537
pharaoh Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 186, 365, 368
philo Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246; Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
philo judaeus Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
philo of alexandria Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13; Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 284, 285, 291
philosophy Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246
physical Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
piety Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 193
plato/platonic Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 126
plato Dunderberg, Beyond Gnosticism: Myth, Lifestyle, and Society in the School of Valentinus (2008) 219; Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 216, 219, 220
platonism, genesis Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 219
platonism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 179, 180, 212, 217, 362; Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 216
plausibility Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
plutarch Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 212; Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
priest Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 362, 537
promises, divine Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 186
ps.-phocylides Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 193
qge Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 186
questions and answers Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
relation (category) Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 179
resurrection, ancient views of Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 132
rhetoric Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 227
rhetorical devices Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 132
sandelin, k. g. Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 219, 220
sarah Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
savior, christ Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
segal, a. Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 220
sellin, g. Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 219, 220
social status Keener, First-Second Corinthians (2005) 132
socrates Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 180, 227
sons, of deceit Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
sons, of justice Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
soul, as house/temple Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 362
soul, as wax tablet Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 180, 535
soul, eye of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 126
soul, fall of Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 212
soul, flight of Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 126
soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 212, 229, 362
soul (psyche) Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 284, 285
spirit, characterizations as, breath (life itself) Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
spirit, characterizations as, soul Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
spirit, characterizations as, truth Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
spirit, divine' Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 126
spirit, effects of, virtue Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
spirit, in humanity Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
spirit, modes of presence, indwelling Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
spirit, modes of presence, receiving of Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
spirit, of god (gen, 1-2 Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
spirit Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
spirits, two (lqs 3-4) Levison, Filled with the Spirit (2009) 387
stoicism Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 212, 368, 537
stoics Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 284, 285, 291
substance Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 285, 291
textual problem Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
thiselton, a. c. Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 220
tigris Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
tithe, levitical Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 537
topoi, creation Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
torah, mosaic (pentateuch) Heo, Images of Torah: From the Second-Temple Period to the Middle Ages (2023) 74
unity, of soul Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 362
unity Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 285, 291
verisimilitude Niehoff, Jewish Exegesis and Homeric Scholarship in Alexandria (2011) 159
virtue, cardinal Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 212
virtue Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 368
wisdom Cover, Philo of Alexandria: On the Change of Names (2023) 180, 193; Estes, The Tree of Life (2020) 246
wisdom (sophia) Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 291
wisdom of solomon, and platonism Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 216
wisdom of solomon, and stoicism Engberg-Pedersen, Cosmology and Self in the Apostle Paul: The Material Spirit (2010) 216
wise Garcia, On Human Nature in Early Judaism: Creation, Composition, and Condition (2021) 78
yaldabaoth Corrigan and Rasimus, Gnosticism, Platonism and the Late Ancient World (2013) 13
zeus Geljon and Runia, Philo of Alexandria: On Planting: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2019) 126