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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9155
Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 109.9-109.10
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 1.18 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Martial, Epigrams, 12.28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Martial, Epigrams, 12.28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 15.4, 32.2, 109.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 15.4, 32.2, 109.9-109.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Claudius, 22 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Iulius, 45.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Tacitus, Histories, 1.50 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.50.  Rome was in a state of excitement and horror-stricken not only at the recent outrageous crime, but also at the thought of Otho's former character. Now it was terrified in addition by news with regard to Vitellius, which had been suppressed before Galba's death, so that the citizens believed that only the army of Upper Germany had mutinied. Then the thought that two men, the worst in the world for their shamelessness, indolence, and profligacy, had been apparently chosen by fate to ruin the empire, caused open grief not only to the senators and knights who had some share and interest in the state, but even to the common people. Their talk was no longer of the recent horrors of a bloody peace, but they recalled memories of the civil wars and spoke of the many times the city had been captured by Roman armies, of the devastation of Italy, of the plundering of the provinces, of Pharsalia, Philippi, Perusia, and Mutina, names notorious for public disaster. They said that the world had been well-nigh overturned, even when the principate was the prize of honest men; but yet the empire had remained when Julius Caesar won, and had likewise remained when Augustus won; the republic would have remained if Pompey and Brutus had been successful; but now — should they go to the temples to pray for an Otho or a Vitellius? Prayers for either would be impious and vows for either detestable when, in the struggle between the two, the only thing of which men were certain was that the victor would be the worse. There were some who had forebodings of Vespasian and the armies in the East, and yet although Vespasian was a better man than Otho or Vitellius, they shuddered at another war and another massacre. Indeed Vespasian's reputation was uncertain; he, unlike all his predecessors, was the only emperor who was changed for the better by his office.
9. Lucian, Alexander The False Prophet, 13 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. In the fullness of time, his plan took shape. He went one night to the temple foundations, still in process of digging, and with standing water in them which had collected from the rainfall or otherwise; here he deposited a goose egg, into which, after blowing it, he had inserted some new born reptile. He made a resting place deep down in the mud for this and departed. Early next morning he rushed into the market place, naked except for a gold spangled loin cloth; with nothing but this and his scimitar, and shaking his long loose hair, like the fanatics who collect money in the name of Cybele[1], he climbed on to a lofty altar and delivered a harangue, felicitating the city upon the advent of the God now to bless them with his presence. In a few minutes nearly the whole population was on the spot, women, old men, and children included; all was awe, prayer, and adoration. He uttered some unintelligible sounds, which might have been Hebrew or Phoenician[2], but completed his victory over his audience, who could make nothing of what he said, beyond the constant repetition of the names Apollo and Asclepius. [1] Cybele | Great mother goddess of Anatolia. [2] Hebrew or Phoenician | Both are languages from the Central Semitic language subgroup and would have sounded similar to an untrained ear.
10. Lucian, Hermotimus, Or Sects, 86 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

86. Her . You are quite right. And now I will be off to metamorphose myself. When we next meet, there will be no long, shaggy beard, no artificial composure; I shall be natural, as a gentleman should. I may go as far as a fashionable coat, by way of publishing my renunciation of nonsense. I only wish there were an emetic that would purge out every doctrine they have instilled into me; I assure you, if I could reverse Chrysippus's plan with the hellebore, and drink forgetfulness, not of the world but of Stoicism, I would not think twice about it. Well, Lycinus, I owe you a debt indeed; I was being swept along in a rough turbid torrent, unresisting, drifting with the stream; when lo, you stood there and fished me out, a true deus ex machina. I have good enough reason, I think, to shave my head like the people who get clear off from a wreck; for I am to make votive offerings today for the dispersion of that thick cloud which was over my eyes. Henceforth, if I meet a philosopher on my walks (and it will not be with my will), I shall turn aside and avoid him as I would a mad dog.
11. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 9.46.6 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
age, old Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
age, youth Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
animus/anima Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
artemidorus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
baldness and shaven heads Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 83
capitoline hill Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
character (personality) Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
charisma Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
christians, christianity Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
citizenship Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
claudius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
codes, family, sexuality, beard Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
cult, mysteries, rituals, foundation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
cult, mysteries, rituals, public/private Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
cult, mysteries, rituals, worshippers Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
death Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
devotion Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
dreams Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
elite, senators Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
emperor, roman, cult Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
emperor, roman Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
epicur, epicurean views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
family, slaves Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202, 236
groups, group formation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
impiety Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
individual, status Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
isis Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
livy Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
magna mater Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
performance Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
person, persona Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
person Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
petronius Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 83; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202, 236
plutarch Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
polis Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
populus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
prayer, preces Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
prayer Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
priesthood, pontifices Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
priesthood Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
pythagoras, pythagorean views Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
rhetoric Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
satire Graverini, Literature and Identity in The Golden Ass of Apuleius (2012) 83
satire (literary genre) Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
sexuality, prostitution Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
suetonius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202, 236
tacitus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
temples Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
vates Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 202
vows (vota), pro salute' Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236