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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9145
Persius, Saturae, 1.32-1.43
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nanDoes the tombstone settle more lightly on his bones? The guests applaud: will violets spring then from his Embers, out of the tomb, from those fortunate remains? – You mock too much, you look down your nose at me. But who’s without the desire to earn the people’s praise; Leave behind work worthy of preservation with cedar-oil, Not doomed to end as wrapping for mackerel or incense? You, whoever you are, you whom I’ve created to present The opposite case, if by chance something good emerges From my writing – a rare bird that would be – but if it does, I’m not anxious for praise. Not because I’m made of iron, But because I refuse to consider your ‘bravo’ and ‘lovely’ As the be-all and end-all of endorsement. Examine that Cry of ‘lovely’ thoroughly: and what does it not embrace? Isn’t the Iliad there, that Iliad by Attius, who gets drunk On hellebore? And all those little elegies dictated by our Dyspeptic lords? In short whatever’s scribbled on couches Of citron-wood? You know how to serve up warm tripe, Make a shivering client the gift of a second-hand cloak, Then say ‘ I love the truth, tell me the truth about myself.’ How can I? Do you want me to say you’re talking rubbish, Baldy, you with your fat belly sticking out a foot and half? O, bi-faced Janus, never suffering gestures behind your back; Pecking storks; nor waggling hands imitating donkey’s ears; Nor a hanging tongue like some Apulian dog dying of thirst! But you, of patrician blood, you who must do without eyes In the back of your head, come see the grimaces behind you. – What’s the popular view? – What indeed, but that poetry at last moves in a measured way, So that the links flow smoothly through critical fingers. Bravo, To the poet, who knows how to lay out a line with one eye shut, As if he were stretching a plumb-line! Whether he aims to talk Of morality, luxury or the banquets of kings, the Muse grants Him ample matter. Behold, we’re teaching people now to pen Heroic sentiments who used to dabble in Greek foolishness, Not artful enough to paint a grove, to praise rich countryside, Its hearths, baskets, pigs, and its burning hay at the Palilia, The land of Remus, and of Cincinnatus, polishing his plough In the furrow, his flustered wife dressing him as a dictator In front of the oxen, the lictor bearing the ploughshare home! Nowadays one will linger over Dionysian Accius’ dry tome, Others do likewise over Pacuvius, and his warty Antiope, ‘Her melancholy heart besieged by troubles.’ When you see Bleary-eyed fathers pouring this sort of education into Their sons, need you question where the stew of language On their tongues derives from, or that disgraceful rubbish Your young knights on the benches exult in? Aren't you Ashamed you’re unable even to defend some white-haired Old client on a charge, without needing to hear that tepid ‘Nicely done’? They tell Pedius: ‘You’re a thief!’ What Does Pedius reply? He frames the charge smoothly as an Antithesis, and is praised for expressing it all so skilfully: ‘How lovely, that is!’ Lovely, that? Isn’t it mere flattery, Roman? Should I be stirred, and toss a penny to every Shipwrecked sailor who sings a song? Isn’t that how you Sing, with a picture of you in a crushed boat, by your side? Whoever wants to move me with his lament will show Genuine tears, not some tale he’s drummed up overnight. – Yet elegance and harmony has been added to raw measure. Here’s how ‘Berecynthian Attis’ learned to do line-endings
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

26 results
1. Cicero, On The Haruspices, 44 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On Duties, 1.144 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.144. Talis est igitur ordo actionum adhibendus, ut, quem ad modum in oratione constanti, sic in vita omnia sint apta inter se et convenientia; turpe enimn valdeque vitiosum in re severa convivio digna aut delicatum aliquem inferre sermonem. Bene Pericles, cum haberet collegam in praetura Sophoclem poëtam iique de communi officio convenissent et casu formosus puer praeteriret dixissetque Sophocles: O puerum pulchrum, Pericle! At enim praetorem, Sophocle, decet non solum manus, sed etiam oculos abstinentes habere. Atqui hoc idem Sophocles si in athletarum probatione dixisset, iusta reprehensione caruisset. Tanta vis est et loci et temporis. Ut, si qui, cum causam sit acturus, in itinere aut in ambulatione secum ipse meditetur, aut si quid aliud attentius cogitet, non reprehendatur, at hoc idem si in convivio faciat, inhumanus videatur inscitia temporis. 1.144.  Such orderliness of conduct is, therefore, to be observed, that everything in the conduct of our life shall balance and harmonize, as in a finished speech. For it is unbecoming and highly censurable, when upon a serious theme, to introduce such jests as are proper at a dinner, or any sort of loose talk. When Pericles was associated with the poet Sophocles as his colleague in command and they had met to confer about official business that concerned them both, a handsome boy chanced to pass and Sophocles said: "Look, Pericles; what a pretty boy!" How pertinent was Pericles's reply: "Hush, Sophocles, a general should keep not only his hands but his eyes under control." And yet, if Sophocles had made this same remark at a trial of athletes, he would have incurred no just reprimand. So great is the significance of both place and circumstance. For example, if anyone, while on a journey or on a walk, should rehearse to himself a case which he is preparing to conduct in court, or if he should under similar circumstances apply his closest thought to some other subject, he would not be open to censure: but if he should do that same thing at a dinner, he would be thought ill-bred, because he ignored the proprieties of the occasion.
3. Cicero, Letters, 2.12.2, 9.1.3, 13.52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Letters, 2.12.2, 9.1.3, 13.52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, Letters, 2.12.2, 9.1.3, 13.52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, Letters, 2.12.2, 9.1.3, 13.52 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Catullus, Poems, 13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Ovid, Tristia, 4.10.43 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Seneca The Younger, Quaestiones Naturales, 1.17.10 (1st cent. BCE

10. Vergil, Aeneis, 8.710 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.710. knew that his mother in the skies redeemed
11. Juvenal, Satires, 2.96-2.97 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Martial, Epigrams, 2.43, 2.46, 3.50, 4.8.7-4.8.12, 5.16.9, 5.78.25, 10.20, 11.52 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Martial, Epigrams, 2.43, 2.46, 3.50, 4.8.7-4.8.12, 5.16.9, 5.78.25, 10.20, 11.52 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Persius, Satires, 1.1-1.5, 1.30-1.31, 1.33-1.44, 1.48-1.49, 1.51, 1.54, 1.88-1.89, 1.107-1.108, 1.120, 1.123-1.126, 3.24-3.26, 3.28-3.29, 3.52-3.55, 3.74, 3.113-3.114 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Persius, Saturae, 1.1-1.5, 1.30-1.44, 1.48-1.49, 1.51, 1.54, 1.88-1.89, 1.107-1.108, 1.120, 1.123-1.126, 3.24-3.26, 3.28-3.29, 3.52-3.55, 3.74, 3.113-3.114 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 55, 23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

17. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 55, 23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

18. Seneca The Younger, Natural Questions, 1.17.10, 7.31.3 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Suetonius, Augustus, 68 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Suetonius, Otho, 12.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Tacitus, Annals, 3.49, 14.16, 14.48 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.49.  At the end of the year, Clutorius Priscus, a Roman knight, who had been presented by the emperor with a sum of money in return for a widely circulated poem deploring the death of Germanicus, was attacked by an informer; the charge being that during an illness of Drusus he had composed another set of verses, to be published, in the event of his death, with a yet more lucrative result. Clutorius, with foolish loquacity, had boasted of his performance in the house of Publius Petronius, before his host's mother-in‑law, Vitellia, and many women of rank. When the informer appeared, the rest were terrified into giving evidence; Vitellia alone insisted that she had heard nothing. However, the witnesses who supported the fatal charge were considered the more credible; and, on the motion of the consul designate, Haterius Agrippa, the last penalty was invoked against the culprit. 14.16.  And yet, lest it should be only the histrionic skill of the emperor which won publicity, he affected also a zeal for poetry and gathered a group of associates with some faculty for versification but not such as to have yet attracted remark. These, after dining, sat with him, devising a connection for the lines they had brought from home or invented on the spot, and eking out the phrases suggested, for better or worse, by their master; the method being obvious even from the general cast of the poems, which run without energy or inspiration and lack unity of style. Even to the teachers of philosophy he accorded a little time — but after dinner, and in order to amuse himself by the wrangling which attended the exposition of their conflicting dogmas. Nor was there any dearth of gloomy-browed and sad-eyed sages eager to figure among the diversions of majesty. 14.48.  In the consulate of Publius Marius and Lucius Afinius, the praetor Antistius, whose licence of conduct in his plebeian tribuneship I have already mentioned, composed a number of scandalous verses on the sovereign, and gave them to the public at the crowded table of Ostorius Scapula, with whom he was dining. He was thereupon accused of treason by Cossutianus Capito, who, by the intercession of his father-in‑law Tigellinus, had lately recovered his senatorial rank. This was the first revival of the statute; and it was believed that the object sought was not so much the destruction of Antistius as the glorification of the emperor, whose tribunician veto was to snatch him from death when already condemned by the senate. Although Ostorius had stated in evidence that he had heard nothing, the witnesses on the other side were credited; and the consul designate, Junius Marullus, moved for the accused to be stripped of his praetorship and executed in the primitive manner. The other members were expressing assent, when Thrasea Paetus, after a large encomium upon the Caesar and a most vigorous attack on Antistius, took up the argument:— "It did not follow that the full penalty which a guilty prisoner deserved to undergo was the one that ought to be decided upon, under an excellent emperor and by a senate not fettered by any sort of compulsion. The executioner and the noose were forgotten things; and there were punishments established by various laws under which it was possible to inflict a sentence branding neither the judges with brutality nor the age with infamy. In fact, on an island, with his property confiscated, the longer he dragged out his criminal existence, the deeper would be his personal misery, and he would also furnish a number example of public clemency.
22. Clement of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, 3.5, 3.10-3.11, 3.13 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

23. Gellius, Attic Nights, 6.12, 19.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Herodian, History of The Empire After Marcus, 4.7.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

25. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.15.2, 2.11.23 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

26. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.15.2, 2.11.23 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accessories Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
actor/s van 't Westeinde, Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites (2021) 96
adulteresses Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
antistius Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206
appearance van 't Westeinde, Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites (2021) 96
catasterismi (piso) Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
cicero, on poetry as part of conversation Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
cicero Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206
clodius, p. Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
cosmetics Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
demetrias van 't Westeinde, Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites (2021) 96
depilation Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
dress, clothing van 't Westeinde, Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites (2021) 96
dress, female Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
dress, luxury Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
elagabulus (roman emperor) Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
etruscan Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
flavius (clement of alexandria) Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
furia van 't Westeinde, Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites (2021) 96
gender Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
grooming Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
haircombs Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
hairdresser Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
horace, and performance of poetry Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206
identity Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
jewellery Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
juvenal Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206
ligurinus, and recitations Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
macer Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
marginality, and mainstream Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 66
marginalization, poetic Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 66
martial, on reading Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
masculinity Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
mirrors Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
modesty Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
mosaics Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
mundus muliebris Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
nero Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206
north africa, roman Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
oral performance, of poetry Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206
ovid, and reading Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
persius, aesthetics Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 66
persius, social status Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 67
persius Arampapaslis, Augoustakis, Froedge, Schroer, Dynamics Of Marginality: Liminal Characters and Marginal Groups in Neronian and Flavian Literature (2023) 66, 67; Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206; van 't Westeinde, Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites (2021) 96
piso, calpurnius, catasterismi Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
pliny the younger, on recitations Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
poetry, and reading aloud Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
portraits, principate Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
prostitutes Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
public performance, of poetry Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206
quinn, kenneth, on oral performance Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
quotation, aloud Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
recitation, and ligurinus' Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
reliefs, mundus muliebris Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
rouge Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
self-fashioning Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
seneca the younger, on reading Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
servants/slaves van 't Westeinde, Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites (2021) 96
social status/standing van 't Westeinde, Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites (2021) 96
sophists Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
spurinna Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 204
tacitus Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206
tertullian Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
tibullus Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 206
toiletries Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
transformation van 't Westeinde, Roman Nobilitas in Jerome's Letters: Roman Values and Christian Asceticism for Socialites (2021) 96
wife, wives Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
wigs Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188
womens toilette Edmondson, Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture (2008) 188