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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9125
Pausanias, Description Of Greece, 3.11.3


ἐπιφανέστατον δὲ τῆς ἀγορᾶς ἐστιν ἣν στοὰν Περσικὴν ὀνομάζουσιν ἀπὸ λαφύρων ποιηθεῖσαν τῶν Μηδικῶν· ἀνὰ χρόνον δὲ αὐτὴν ἐς μέγεθος τὸ νῦν καὶ ἐς κόσμον τὸν παρόντα μεταβεβλήκασιν. εἰσὶ δὲ ἐπὶ τῶν κιόνων Πέρσαι λίθου λευκοῦ καὶ ἄλλοι καὶ Μαρδόνιος ὁ Γωβρύου. πεποίηται δὲ καὶ Ἀρτεμισία, θυγάτηρ μὲν Λυγδάμιδος, ἐβασίλευσε δὲ Ἁλικαρνασσοῦ· ταύτην φασὶν ἑκουσίως ἐπὶ τὴν Ἑλλάδα συστρατεῦσαι Ξέρξῃ καὶ ἔργα ἐν τῇ ναυμαχίᾳ περὶ Σαλαμῖνα ἀποδείξασθαι.The most striking feature in the marketplace is the portico which they call Persian because it was made from spoils taken in the Persian wars. In course of time they have altered it until it is as large and as splendid as it is now. On the pillars are white-marble figures of Persians, including Mardonius, son of Gobryas. There is also a figure of Artemisia, daughter of Lygdamis and queen of Halicarnassus . It is said that this lady voluntarily joined the expedition of Xerxes against Greece and distinguished herself at the naval engagement off Salamis .


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 9.12 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9.12. So they made haste to reach the Isthmus. The Argives, however, had already promised Mardonius that they would prevent the Spartans from going out to war. As soon as they were informed that Pausanias and his army had departed from Sparta, they sent as their herald to Attica the swiftest runner of long distances whom they could find. ,When he came to Athens, he spoke to Mardonius in the following manner: “I have been sent by the Argives to tell you that the young men have gone out from Lacedaemon to war, and that the Argives cannot prevent them from so doing; therefore, make plans accordingly.”
2. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.5-1.1.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Plutarch, Pericles, 13.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13.5. while Xenocles, of the deme Cholargus, set on high the lantern over the shrine. 41 For the long wall, concerning which Socrates says Plat. Gorg. 455e . he himself heard Pericles introduce a measure, Callicrates was the contractor. Cratinus pokes fun at this work for its slow progress, and in these words:— Since ever so long now In word has Pericles pushed the thing; in fact he does not budge it. From a play of unknown name. Kock, Com. Att. Frag. i. p. 100 The Odeum, which was arranged internally with many tiers of seats and many pillars, and which had a roof made with a circular slope from a single peak, they say was an exact reproduction of the Great King’s pavilion, and this too was built under the superintendence of Pericles.
4. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.20.4, 10.15.1, 10.16.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.20.4. Near the sanctuary of Dionysus and the theater is a structure, which is said to be a copy of Xerxes' tent. It has been rebuilt, for the old building was burnt by the Roman general Sulla when he took Athens 86 B.C. . The cause of the war was this. Mithridates was king over the foreigners around the Euxine. Now the grounds on which he made war against the Romans, how he crossed into Asia, and the cities he took by force of arms or made his friends, I must leave for those to find out who wish to know the history of Mithridates, and I shall confine my narrative to the capture of Athens . 10.15.1. A gilt statue of Phryne was made by Praxiteles, one of her lovers, but it was Phryne herself who dedicated the statue. The offerings next to Phryne include two images of Apollo, one dedicated from Persian spoils by the Epidaurians of Argolis, the other dedicated by the Megarians to commemorate a victory over the Athenians at Nisaea . The Plataeans have dedicated an ox, an offering made at the time when, in their own territory, they took part, along with the other Greeks, in the defence against Mardonius, the son of Gobryas. Then there are another two images of Apollo, one dedicated by the citizens of Heracleia on the Euxine, the other by the Amphictyons when they fined the Phocians for tilling the territory of the god. 10.16.6. The Euboeans of Carystus too set up in the sanctuary of Apollo a bronze ox, from spoils taken in the Persian war. The Carystians and the Plataeans dedicated oxen, I believe, because, having repulsed the barbarian, they had won a secure prosperity, and especially a land free to plough. The Aetolian nation, having subdued their neighbors the Acarians, sent statues of generals and images of Apollo and Artemis.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aetiology Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73
aphrodite, pythios of delphi Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
argumentum Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 72, 73
artaüctes of persia Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
caryatids, function in de architectura Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 72, 73, 74
carystians Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
ciceromarcus tullius cicero Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 74
civil war Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 74
dedications, after plataea Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
delphi and delphians, dedications at Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
diodorus siculus Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 74
dionysus, of athens Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
durability, of architecture Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73, 74
epidaurians Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
exempla Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 72, 73
expertise Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73
heroes and heroines, of elaeus Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
historia Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73
imagines Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73, 74
impiety, of violating and destroying sanctuaries Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
leuctra Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 74
memoria posteris tradere formula Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 72, 73
metaexemplarity Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73
miracles, at elaeus Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
nicolaus of syracuse Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 74
omens, to artaüctes Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
persian portico Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 72, 73, 74
plataea Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 72, 73, 74
plataeans Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
protesilaus, hero of elaeus Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
rationem redde rerender account Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73
sparta Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73, 74
spartans, dedications of Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
spartans Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
sulla of rome Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109
triumphs Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73, 74
trophies Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 72, 73, 74
varietas variety or vicissitude' Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 74
varietas variety or vicissitude Oksanish, Vitruvian Man: Rome Under Construction (2019) 73
xanthippus of athens Mikalson, Herodotus and Religion in the Persian Wars (2003) 109