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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9125
Pausanias, Description Of Greece, 10.4.4


Πανοπεῦσι δέ ἐστιν ἐπὶ τῇ ὁδῷ πλίνθου τε ὠμῆς οἴκημα οὐ μέγα καὶ ἐν αὐτῷ λίθου τοῦ Πεντελῆσιν ἄγαλμα, ὃν Ἀσκληπιόν, οἱ δὲ Προμηθέα εἶναί φασι· καὶ παρέχονταί γε τοῦ λόγου μαρτύρια. λίθοι κεῖνταί σφισιν ἐπὶ τῇ χαράδρᾳ, μέγεθος μὲν ἑκάτερος ὡς φόρτον ἀποχρῶντα ἁμάξης εἶναι, χρῶμα δέ ἐστι πηλοῦ σφισιν, οὐ γεώδους ἀλλʼ οἷος ἂν χαράδρας γένοιτο ἢ χειμάρρου ψαμμώδους, παρέχονται δὲ καὶ ὀσμὴν ἐγγύτατα χρωτὶ ἀνθρώπου· ταῦτα ἔτι λείπεσθαι τοῦ πηλοῦ λέγουσιν ἐξ οὗ καὶ ἅπαν ὑπὸ τοῦ Προμηθέως τὸ γένος πλασθῆναι τῶν ἀνθρώπων.At Panopeus there is by the roadside a small building of unburnt brick, in which is an image of Pentelic marble, said by some to be Asclepius, by others Prometheus. The latter produce evidence of their contention. At the ravine there lie two stones, each of which is big enough to fill a cart. They have the color of clay, not earthy clay, but such as would be found in a ravine or sandy torrent, and they smell very like the skin of a man. They say that these are remains of the clay out of which the whole race of mankind was fashioned by Prometheus.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.101-2.108, 2.604-2.609 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.101. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.102. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.103. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.104. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.105. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.106. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.107. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.108. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.604. /and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; 2.605. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor 2.606. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor 2.607. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor 2.608. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor 2.609. /and they that dwelt in Pheneos and Orchomenus, rich in flocks, and Rhipe and Stratia and wind-swept Enispe; and that held Tegea and lovely Mantineia; and that held Stymphalus and dwelt in Parrhasia, —all these were led by the son of Ancaeus, Lord Agapenor
2. Homer, Odyssey, 11.577, 11.581 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 1.9.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.9.2. Indeed, the account given by those Peloponnesians who have been the recipients of the most credible tradition is this. First of all Pelops, arriving among a needy population from Asia with vast wealth, acquired such power that, stranger though he was, the country was called after him; and this power fortune saw fit materially to increase in the hands of his descendants. Eurystheus had been killed in Attica by the Heraclids. Atreus was his mother's brother; and to the hands of his relation, who had left his father on account of the death of Chrysippus, Eurystheus, when he set out on his expedition, had committed Mycenae and the government. As time went on and Eurystheus did not return, Atreus complied with the wishes of the Mycenaeans, who were influenced by fear of the Heraclids,—besides, his power seemed considerable, and he had not neglected to court the favour of the populace,—and assumed the sceptre of Mycenae and the rest of the dominions of Eurystheus. And so the power of the descendants of Pelops came to be greater than that of the descendants of Perseus.
4. Aelius Aristides, Orations, 19.5, 47.59, 47.61-47.68, 48.19-48.22, 50.10-50.11, 50.14-50.20, 50.25-50.31, 50.78-50.79, 51.16, 51.31, 51.35-51.36, 51.38 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.21.3, 8.16.2, 9.40.11-9.40.12, 10.4.1-10.4.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.21.3. Such were his words. On the South wall, as it is called, of the Acropolis, which faces the theater, there is dedicated a gilded head of Medusa the Gorgon, and round it is wrought an aegis. At the top of the theater is a cave in the rocks under the Acropolis. This also has a tripod over it, wherein are Apollo and Artemis slaying the children of Niobe. This Niobe I myself saw when I had gone up to Mount Sipylus. When you are near it is a beetling crag, with not the slightest resemblance to a woman, mourning or otherwise; but if you go further away you will think you see a woman in tears, with head bowed down. 8.16.2. Not far from Tricrena is another mountain called Sepia, where they say that Aepytus, the son of Elatus, was killed by the snake, and they also made his grave on the spot, for they could not carry the body away. These snakes are still to be found, the Arcadians say, on the mountain, even at the present day; not many, however, for they are very scarce. The reason is that, as for the greater part of the year snow falls on the mountain, the snakes die that are cut off by the snow from their holes, while should any make good their escape to the holes, nevertheless some of them are killed by the snow, as the frost penetrates even into the very holes themselves. 9.40.11. of the gods, the people of Chaeroneia honor most the scepter which Homer says Hom. Il. 2.101 foll. Hephaestus made for Zeus, Hermes received from Zeus and gave to Pelops, Pelops left to Atreus, Atreus to Thyestes, and Agamemnon had from Thyestes. This scepter, then, they worship, calling it Spear. That there is something peculiarly divine about this scepter is most clearly shown by the fame it brings to the Chaeroneans. 9.40.12. They say that it was discovered on the border of their own country and of Panopeus in Phocis, that with it the Phocians discovered gold, and that they were glad themselves to get the scepter instead of the gold. I am of opinion that it was brought to Phocis by Agamemnon's daughter Electra. It has no public temple made for it, but its priest keeps the scepter for one year in a house. Sacrifices are offered to it every day, and by its side stands a table full of meats and cakes of all sorts. 10.4.1. Such were the memorable exploits of the Phocians. From Chaeroneia it is twenty stades to Panopeus, a city of the Phocians, if one can give the name of city to those who possess no government offices, no gymnasium, no theater, no market-place, no water descending to a fountain, but live in bare shelters just like mountain cabins, right on a ravine. Nevertheless, they have boundaries with their neighbors, and even send delegates to the Phocian assembly. The name of the city is derived, they say, from the father of Epeius, and they maintain that they are not Phocians, but were originally Phlegyans who fled to Phocis from the land of Orchomenus . 10.4.2. A survey of the ancient circuit of Panopeus led me to guess it to be about seven stades. I was reminded of Homer's verses about Tityos, See Hom. Od. 11.581 where he mentions the city of Panopeus with its beautiful dancing-floors, and how in the fight over the body of Patroclus he says that Schedius, son of Iphitus and king of the Phocians, who was killed by Hector, lived in Panopeus. See Hom. Il. 17.307 foll. It seemed to me that the reason why the king lived here was fear of the Boeotians; at this point is the easiest pass from Boeotia into Phocis, so the king used Panopeus as a fortified post. 10.4.3. The former passage, in which Homer speaks of the beautiful dancing-floors of Panopeus, I could not understand until I was taught by the women whom the Athenians call Thyiads. The Thyiads are Attic women, who with the Delphian women go to Parnassus every other year and celebrate orgies in honor of Dionysus. It is the custom for these Thyiads to hold dances at places, including Panopeus, along the road from Athens . The epithet Homer applies to Panopeus is thought to refer to the dance of the Thyiads.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agamemnon, sceptre of Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128
aipytos Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 129
argos Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157
aristides Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
asclepius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
avidius cassius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
catalogue of ships Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128
centaur Rojas, The Remains of the Past and the Invention of Archaeology in Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons (2019) 187
chaironeia Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128
chauvinism Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157
commodus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
creator of mankind' Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 106
creator of mankind Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
cyzicus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
daidalos Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 129
deukalion Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 106
diophantus of sphettus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
dream Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
electra Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128
epimetheus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
experience of travel Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128, 129
feedback Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157
flood Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33, 106
gods Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
graikoi/s Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
heracles Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 106
homer Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128, 129
hypermnestra Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157
incubation Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
inscription, anatolian hieroglyphic Rojas, The Remains of the Past and the Invention of Archaeology in Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons (2019) 187
julius apellas (m.) Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
ladon, river Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128
locris Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
lynceus (argive) Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157
lyrceia Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157
marcus aurelius Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
mylasa Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
myth, and power Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157, 158
myth, infrastructures for Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157, 158
niobe Rojas, The Remains of the Past and the Invention of Archaeology in Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons (2019) 187
nostalgia Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157, 158
oratory Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
pandora, daughter of deukalion Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
pandora, part of thessaly Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
pandora Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
panopeus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 106; Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128, 129, 157, 158; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
pausanias, judges mythic authenticity Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128, 129
philostratus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
prometheus Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157, 158; Rojas, The Remains of the Past and the Invention of Archaeology in Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons (2019) 187; Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
prymnessus, akpınar Rojas, The Remains of the Past and the Invention of Archaeology in Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons (2019) 187
publius granius rufus Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
pyrrha/aia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
rationalization Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128, 129
relics Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128, 129
rome Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
ruins, ruination Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157, 158
seha river land Rojas, The Remains of the Past and the Invention of Archaeology in Roman Anatolia: Interpreters, Traces, Horizons (2019) 187
shared or common traditions Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157
sicyon Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
smyrna Trapp et al., In Praise of Asclepius: Selected Prose Hymns (2016) 62
thebes Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 157
thessaly Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33
tityos Hawes, Pausanias in the World of Greek Myth (2021) 128, 129
zeus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 33