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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9125
Pausanias, Description Of Greece, 10.12.3


ταῦτα μὲν δὴ μαινομένη τε καὶ ἐκ τοῦ θεοῦ κάτοχος πεποίηκεν· ἑτέρωθι δὲ εἶπε τῶν χρησμῶν ὡς μητρὸς μὲν ἀθανάτης εἴη μιᾶς τῶν ἐν Ἴδῃ νυμφῶν, πατρὸς δὲ ἀνθρώπου, καὶ οὕτω λέγει τὰ ἔπη· εἰμὶ δʼ ἐγὼ γεγαυῖα μέσον θνητοῦ τε θεᾶς τε, νύμφης δʼ ἀθανάτης, πατρὸς δʼ αὖ κητοφάγοιο, μητρόθεν Ἰδογενής, πατρὶς δέ μοί ἐστιν ἐρυθρή Μάρπησσος, μητρὸς ἱερή, ποταμός τʼ Ἀιδωνεύς.These statements she made in her poetry when in a frenzy and possessed by the god. Elsewhere in her oracles she states that her mother was an immortal, one of the nymphs of Ida, while her father was a human. These are the verses:— I am by birth half mortal, half divine; An immortal nymph was my mother, my father an eater of corn; On my mother's side of Idaean birth, but my fatherland was red Marpessus, sacred to the Mother, and the river Aidoneus.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 9.553-9.564 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.553. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.554. /Now so long as Meleager, dear to Ares, warred, so long went it ill with the Curetes, nor might they abide without their wall, for all they were very many. But when wrath entered into Meleager, wrath that maketh the heart to swell in the breasts also of others, even though they be wise 9.555. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.556. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.557. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.558. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.559. /he then, wroth at heart against his dear mother Althaea, abode beside his wedded wife, the fair Cleopatra, daughter of Marpessa of the fair ankles, child of Evenus, and of Idas that was mightiest of men that were then upon the face of earth; who also took his bow to face the king 9.560. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.561. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.562. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.563. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away. 9.564. /Phoebus Apollo for the sake of the fair-ankled maid. Her of old in their halls had her father and honoured mother called Halcyone by name, for that the mother herself in a plight even as that of the halcyon-bird of many sorrows, wept because Apollo that worketh afar had snatched her child away.
2. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 62.18.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

62.18.3.  There was no curse that the populace did not invoke upon Nero, though they did not mention his name, but simply cursed in general terms those who had set the city on fire. And they were disturbed above all by recalling the oracle which once in the time of Tiberius had been on everybody's lips. It ran thus: "Thrice three hundred years having run their course of fulfilment, Rome by the strife of her people shall perish.
3. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.12.1-10.12.2, 10.12.6-10.12.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.12.1. There is a rock rising up above the ground. On it, say the Delphians, there stood and chanted the oracles a woman, by name Herophile and surnamed Sibyl. The former Sibyl I find was as ancient as any; the Greeks say that she was a daughter of Zeus by Lamia, daughter of Poseidon, that she was the first woman to chant oracles, and that the name Sibyl was given her by the Libyans. 10.12.2. Herophile was younger than she was, but nevertheless she too was clearly born before the Trojan war, as she foretold in her oracles that Helen would be brought up in Sparta to be the ruin of Asia and of Europe, and that for her sake the Greeks would capture Troy . The Delians remember also a hymn this woman composed to Apollo. In her poem she calls herself not only Herophile but also Artemis, and the wedded wife of Apollo, saying too sometimes that she is his sister, and sometimes that she is his daughter. 10.12.6. However, death came upon her in the Troad, and her tomb is in the grove of the Sminthian with these elegiac verses inscribed upon the tomb-stone:— Here I am, the plain-speaking Sibyl of Phoebus, Hidden beneath this stone tomb. A maiden once gifted with voice, but now for ever voiceless, By hard fate doomed to this fetter. But I am buried near the nymphs and this Hermes, Enjoying in the world below a part of the kingdom I had then. The Hermes stands by the side of the tomb, a square-shaped figure of stone. On the left is water running down into a well, and the images of the nymphs. 10.12.7. The Erythraeans, who are more eager than any other Greeks to lay claim to Herophile, adduce as evidence a mountain called Mount Corycus with a cave in it, saying that Herophile was born in it, and that she was a daughter of Theodorus, a shepherd of the district, and of a nymph. They add that the surname Idaean was given to the nymph simply because the men of those days called idai places that were thickly wooded. The verse about Marpessus and the river Aidoneus is cut out of the oracles by the Erythraeans. 10.12.8. The next woman to give oracles in the same way, according to Hyperochus of Cumae, a historian, was called Demo, and came from Cumae in the territory of the Opici. The Cumaeans can point to no oracle given by this woman, but they show a small stone urn in a sanctuary of Apollo, in which they say are placed the bones of the Sibyl. 10.12.9. Later than Demo there grew up among the Hebrews above Palestine a woman who gave oracles and was named Sabbe. They say that the father of Sabbe was Berosus, and her mother Erymanthe. But some call her a Babylonian Sibyl, others an Egyptian.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apollo Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 87
archaic greek (sibyl) Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 87
artemis Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 87
asia minor Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
cassius dio Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
delos Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
delphi Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
erythrae Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
helen Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
heraclitus Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
hexameter Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
lactantius Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
oracles, relationship with poetry Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
oracles Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
plutarch Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
poseidon Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 87
prophecy' König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
prophecy Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
sibyl, erythraean sibyl Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
sibyl Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
sibylline oracles Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
sparta Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
tiberius Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
varro Konig and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188; König and Wiater, Late Hellenistic Greek Literature in Dialogue (2022) 188
zeus Bacchi, Uncovering Jewish Creativity in Book III of the Sibylline Oracles: Gender, Intertextuality, and Politics (2022) 87