Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



9125
Pausanias, Description Of Greece, 1.34


nannan, The land of Oropus, between Attica and the land of Tanagra, which originally belonged to Boeotia, in our time belongs to the Athenians, who always fought for it but never won secure pos session until Philip gave it to them after taking Thebes . The city is on the coast and affords nothing remarkable to record. About twelve stades from the city is a sanctuary of Amphiaraus., Legend says that when Amphiaraus was exiled from Thebes the earth opened and swallowed both him and his chariot. Only they say that the incident did not happen here, the place called the Chariot being on the road from Thebes to Chalcis . The divinity of Amphiaraus was first established among the Oropians, from whom afterwards all the Greeks received the cult. I can enumerate other men also born at this time who are worshipped among the Greeks as gods; some even have cities dedicated to them, such as Eleus in Chersonnesus dedicated to Protesilaus, and Lebadea of the Boeotians dedicated to Trophonius. The Oropians have both a temple and a white marble statue of Amphiaraus., The altar shows parts. One part is to Heracles, Zeus, and Apollo Healer, another is given up to heroes and to wives of heroes, the third is to Hestia and Hermes and Amphiaraus and the children of Amphilochus. But Alcmaeon, because of his treatment of Eriphyle, is honored neither in the temple of Amphiaraus nor yet with Amphilochus. The fourth portion of the altar is to Aphrodite and Panacea, and further to Iaso, Health and Athena Healer. The fifth is dedicated to the nymphs and to Pan, and to the rivers Achelous and Cephisus. The Athenians too have an altar to Amphilochus in the city, and there is at Mallus in Cilicia an oracle of his which is the most trustworthy of my day., The Oropians have near the temple a spring, which they call the Spring of Amphiaraus; they neither sacrifice into it nor are wont to use it for purifications or for lustral water. But when a man has been cured of a disease through a response the custom is to throw silver and coined gold into the spring, for by this way they say that Amphiaraus rose up after he had become a god. Iophon the Cnossian, a guide, produced responses in hexameter verse, saying that Amphiaraus gave them to the Argives who were sent against Thebes . These verses unrestrainedly appealed to popular taste. Except those whom they say Apollo inspired of old none of the seers uttered oracles, but they were good at explaining dreams and interpreting the flights of birds and the entrails of victims., My opinion is that Amphiaraus devoted him self most to the exposition of dreams. It is manifest that, when his divinity was established, it was a dream oracle that he set up. One who has come to consult Amphiaraus is wont first to purify himself. The mode of purification is to sacrifice to the god, and they sacrifice not only to him but also to all those whose names are on the altar. And when all these things have been first done, they sacrifice a ram, and, spreading the skin under them, go to sleep and await enlightenment in a dream.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Aristophanes, Birds, 521 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

521. Λάμπων δ' ὄμνυς' ἔτι καὶ νυνὶ τὸν χῆν', ὅταν ἐξαπατᾷ τι.
2. Euripides, Ion, 301-302, 404-406, 300 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

300. With him. But he is now visiting the cavern of Trophonius. Ion
3. Herodotus, Histories, 1.46.2, 1.52, 7.140-7.144, 8.134 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.46.2. Having thus determined, he at once made inquiries of the Greek and Libyan oracles, sending messengers separately to Delphi, to Abae in Phocia, and to Dodona, while others were despatched to Amphiaraus and Trophonius, and others to Branchidae in the Milesian country. 1.52. Such were the gifts which he sent to Delphi . To Amphiaraus, of whose courage and fate he had heard, he dedicated a shield made entirely of gold and a spear all of solid gold, point and shaft alike. Both of these were until my time at Thebes, in the Theban temple of Ismenian Apollo. 7.140. The Athenians had sent messages to Delphi asking that an oracle be given them, and when they had performed all due rites at the temple and sat down in the inner hall, the priestess, whose name was Aristonice, gave them this answer: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Wretches, why do you linger here? Rather flee from your houses and city, /l lFlee to the ends of the earth from the circle embattled of Athens! /l lThe head will not remain in its place, nor in the body, /l lNor the feet beneath, nor the hands, nor the parts between; /l lBut all is ruined, for fire and the headlong god of war speeding in a Syrian chariot will bring you low. /l /quote , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Many a fortress too, not yours alone, will he shatter; /l lMany a shrine of the gods will he give to the flame for devouring; /l lSweating for fear they stand, and quaking for dread of the enemy, /l lRunning with gore are their roofs, foreseeing the stress of their sorrow; /l lTherefore I bid you depart from the sanctuary. /l lHave courage to lighten your evil. /l /quote 7.141. When the Athenian messengers heard that, they were very greatly dismayed, and gave themselves up for lost by reason of the evil foretold. Then Timon son of Androbulus, as notable a man as any Delphian, advised them to take boughs of supplication and in the guise of suppliants, approach the oracle a second time. ,The Athenians did exactly this; “Lord,” they said, “regard mercifully these suppliant boughs which we bring to you, and give us some better answer concerning our country. Otherwise we will not depart from your temple, but remain here until we die.” Thereupon the priestess gave them this second oracle: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Vainly does Pallas strive to appease great Zeus of Olympus; /l lWords of entreaty are vain, and so too cunning counsels of wisdom. /l lNevertheless I will speak to you again of strength adamantine. /l lAll will be taken and lost that the sacred border of Cecrops /l lHolds in keeping today, and the dales divine of Cithaeron; /l lYet a wood-built wall will by Zeus all-seeing be granted /l lTo the Trito-born, a stronghold for you and your children. /l /quote , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Await not the host of horse and foot coming from Asia, /l lNor be still, but turn your back and withdraw from the foe. /l lTruly a day will come when you will meet him face to face. /l lDivine Salamis, you will bring death to women's sons /l lWhen the corn is scattered, or the harvest gathered in. /l /quote 7.142. This answer seemed to be and really was more merciful than the first, and the envoys, writing it down, departed for Athens. When the messengers had left Delphi and laid the oracle before the people, there was much inquiry concerning its meaning, and among the many opinions which were uttered, two contrary ones were especially worthy of note. Some of the elder men said that the gods answer signified that the acropolis should be saved, for in old time the acropolis of Athens had been fenced by a thorn hedge, ,which, by their interpretation, was the wooden wall. But others supposed that the god was referring to their ships, and they were for doing nothing but equipping these. Those who believed their ships to be the wooden wall were disabled by the two last verses of the oracle: quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Divine Salamis, you will bring death to women's sons /l lWhen the corn is scattered, or the harvest gathered in. /l /quote ,These verses confounded the opinion of those who said that their ships were the wooden wall, for the readers of oracles took the verses to mean that they should offer battle by sea near Salamis and be there overthrown. 7.143. Now there was a certain Athenian, by name and title Themistocles son of Neocles, who had lately risen to be among their chief men. He claimed that the readers of oracles had incorrectly interpreted the whole of the oracle and reasoned that if the verse really pertained to the Athenians, it would have been formulated in less mild language, calling Salamis “cruel” rather than “divine ” seeing that its inhabitants were to perish. ,Correctly understood, the gods' oracle was spoken not of the Athenians but of their enemies, and his advice was that they should believe their ships to be the wooden wall and so make ready to fight by sea. ,When Themistocles put forward this interpretation, the Athenians judged him to be a better counsellor than the readers of oracles, who would have had them prepare for no sea fight, and, in short, offer no resistance at all, but leave Attica and settle in some other country. 7.144. The advice of Themistocles had prevailed on a previous occasion. The revenues from the mines at Laurium had brought great wealth into the Athenians' treasury, and when each man was to receive ten drachmae for his share, Themistocles persuaded the Athenians to make no such division but to use the money to build two hundred ships for the war, that is, for the war with Aegina. ,This was in fact the war the outbreak of which saved Hellas by compelling the Athenians to become seamen. The ships were not used for the purpose for which they were built, but later came to serve Hellas in her need. These ships, then, had been made and were already there for the Athenians' service, and now they had to build yet others. ,In their debate after the giving of the oracle they accordingly resolved that they would put their trust in the god and meet the foreign invader of Hellas with the whole power of their fleet, ships and men, and with all other Greeks who were so minded. 8.134. This man Mys is known to have gone to Lebadea and to have bribed a man of the country to go down into the cave of Trophonius and to have gone to the place of divination at Abae in Phocis. He went first to Thebes where he inquired of Ismenian Apollo (sacrifice is there the way of divination, as at Olympia), and moreover he bribed one who was no Theban but a stranger to lie down to sleep in the shrine of Amphiaraus. ,No Theban may seek a prophecy there, for Amphiaraus bade them by an oracle to choose which of the two they wanted and forgo the other, and take him either for their prophet or for their ally. They chose that he should be their ally. Therefore no Theban may lie down to sleep in that place.
4. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22c. that what they composed they composed not by wisdom, but by nature and because they were inspired, like the prophets and givers of oracles; for these also say many fine things, but know none of the things they say; it was evident to me that the poets too had experienced something of this same sort. And at the same time I perceived that they, on account of their poetry, thought that they were the wisest of men in other things as well, in which they were not. So I went away from them also thinking that I was superior to them in the same thing in which I excelled the public men.Finally then I went to the hand-workers.
5. Plato, Ion, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

534c. as you do about Homer—but by a divine dispensation, each is able only to compose that to which the Muse has stirred him, this man dithyrambs, another laudatory odes, another dance-songs, another epic or else iambic verse; but each is at fault in any other kind. For not by art do they utter these things, but by divine influence; since, if they had fully learnt by art to speak on one kind of theme, they would know how to speak on all. And for this reason God takes away the mind of these men and uses them as his ministers, just as he does soothsayers and godly seers
6. Plato, Meno, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

99c. This is the means which statesmen employ for their direction of states, and they have nothing more to do with wisdom than soothsayers and diviners; for these people utter many a true thing when inspired, but have no knowledge of anything they say. Men. I daresay that is so. Soc. And may we, Meno, rightly call those men divine who, having no understanding, yet succeed in many a great deed and word? Men. Certainly. Soc. Then we shall be right in calling those divine of whom
7. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.102.5-2.102.6 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.102.5. The islands in question are uninhabited and of no great size. There is also a story that Alcmaeon, son of Amphiaraus, during his wanderings after the murder of his mother was bidden by Apollo to inhabit this spot, through an oracle which intimated that he would have no release from his terrors until he should find a country to dwell in which had not been seen by the sun; or existed as land at the time he slew his mother; all else being to him polluted ground. 2.102.6. Perplexed at this, the story goes on to say, he at last observed this deposit of the Achelous, and considered that a place sufficient to support life upon, might have been thrown up during the long interval that had elapsed since the death of his mother and the beginning of his wanderings. Settling, therefore, in the district round Oeniadae, he founded a dominion, and left the country its name from his son Acar. Such is the story we have received concerning Alcmaeon.
8. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 72, 70 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9. Strabo, Geography, 9.3.10, 14.5.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.3.10. As for the contests at Delphi, there was one in early times between citharoedes, who sang a paean in honor of the god; it was instituted by the Delphians. But after the Crisaean war, in the time of Eurylochus, the Amphictyons instituted equestrian and gymnastic contests in which the prize was a crown, and called them Pythian Games. And to the citharoedes they added both fluteplayers and citharists who played without singing, who were to render a certain melody which is called the Pythian Nome. There are five parts of it: angkrousis, ampeira, katakeleusmos, iambi and dactyli, and syringes. Now the melody was composed by Timosthenes, the admiral of the second Ptolemy, who also compiled The Harbours, a work in ten books; and through this melody he means to celebrate the contest between Apollo and the dragon, setting forth the prelude as anakrousis, the first onset of the contest as ampeira, the contest itself as katakeleusmos, the triumph following the victory as iambus and dactylus, the rhythms being in two measures, one of which, the dactyl, is appropriate to hymns of praise, whereas the other, the iamb, is suited to reproaches (compare the word iambize), and the expiration of the dragon as syrinxes, since with syrinx players imitated the dragon as breathing its last in hissings. 14.5.16. After the Cydnus River one comes to the Pyramus River, which flows from Cataonia, a river which I have mentioned before. According to Artemidorus, the distance thence to Soli in a straight voyage is five hundred stadia. Near by, also, is Mallos, situated on a height, founded by Amphilochus and Mopsus, the latter the son of Apollo and Manto, concerning whom many myths are told. And indeed I, too, have mentioned them in my account of Calchas and of the quarrel between Calchas and Mopsus about their powers of divination. For some writers transfer this quarrel, Sophocles, for example, to Cilicia, which he, following the custom of tragic poets, calls Pamphylia, just as he calls Lycia Caria and Troy and Lydia Phrygia. And Sophocles, among others, tells us that Calchas died there. But, according to the myth, the contest concerned, not only the power of divination, but also the sovereignty; for they say that Mopsus and Amphilochus went from Troy and founded Mallos, and that Amphilochus then went away to Argos, and, being dissatisfied with affairs there, returned to Mallos, but that, being excluded from a share in the government there, he fought a duel with Mopsus, and that both fell in the duel and were buried in places that were not in sight of one another. And today their tombs are to be seen in the neighborhood of Magarsa near the Pyramus River. This was the birthplace of Crates the grammarian, of whom Panaetius is said to have been a pupil.
10. New Testament, Acts, 16.16-16.17 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.16. It happened, as we were going to prayer, that a certain girl having a spirit of divination met us, who brought her masters much gain by fortune telling. 16.17. The same, following after Paul and us, cried out, "These men are servants of the Most High God, who proclaim to us the way of salvation!
11. Plutarch, Sayings of The Spartans, 19.1-19.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19.1. Archidamus, the son of Zeuxidamus, when someone inquired of him who were at the head of Sparta, said, The laws and the magistrates in accordance with the laws. 19.2. In answer to a man who praised a harper and expressed amazement at his ability, he said, My good sir, what honours shall you be able to offer to good men when you have such praise for a harper?
12. Plutarch, Aristides, 19.1-19.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Plutarch, On The Obsolescence of Oracles, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

412b. took up a large stone and smote him on the head. All this was in harmony, as it were, with events to come; for Mardonius was vanquished while the Greeks were led, not by a king, but by a guardian and deputy of a king; and he fell, struck by a stone just as the Lydian dreamed that he was struck in his sleep. "That time, too, was the most flourishing period of the oracle at Tegyrae, which place also by tradition is the birthplace of the god; and of the two streams of water that flow past it, the inhabitants even to this day call the one 'Palm' and the other 'Olive.' Now in the Persian Wars, when Echecrates was the prophetic priest, the god prophesied for the Greeks victory and might in war;
14. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.27.2-1.27.3, 1.34.3, 5.17.7, 8.24.8-8.24.9, 9.23.6, 9.39.3-9.39.4 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.27.2. About the olive they have nothing to say except that it was testimony the goddess produced when she contended for their land. Legend also says that when the Persians fired Athens the olive was burnt down, but on the very day it was burnt it grew again to the height of two cubits. Adjoining the temple of Athena is the temple of Pandrosus, the only one of the sisters to be faithful to the trust. 1.27.3. I was much amazed at something which is not generally known, and so I will describe the circumstances. Two maidens dwell not far from the temple of Athena Polias, called by the Athenians Bearers of the Sacred offerings. For a time they live with the goddess, but when the festival comes round they perform at night the following rites. Having placed on their heads what the priestess of Athena gives them to carry—neither she who gives nor they who carry have any knowledge what it is—the maidens descend by the natural underground passage that goes across the adjacent precincts, within the city, of Aphrodite in the Gardens. They leave down below what they carry and receive something else which they bring back covered up. These maidens they henceforth let go free, and take up to the Acropolis others in their place. 1.34.3. The altar shows parts. One part is to Heracles, Zeus, and Apollo Healer, another is given up to heroes and to wives of heroes, the third is to Hestia and Hermes and Amphiaraus and the children of Amphilochus. But Alcmaeon, because of his treatment of Eriphyle, is honored neither in the temple of Amphiaraus nor yet with Amphilochus. The fourth portion of the altar is to Aphrodite and Panacea, and further to Iaso, Health and Athena Healer. The fifth is dedicated to the nymphs and to Pan, and to the rivers Achelous and Cephisus. The Athenians too have an altar to Amphilochus in the city, and there is at Mallus in Cilicia an oracle of his which is the most trustworthy of my day. 5.17.7. Oenomaus is chasing Pelops, who is holding Hippodameia. Each of them has two horses, but those of Pelops have wings. Next is wrought the house of Amphiaraus, and baby Amphilochus is being carried by some old woman or other. In front of the house stands Eriphyle with the necklace, and by her are her daughters Eurydice and Demonassa, and the boy Alcmaeon naked. 8.24.8. They are called “maidens” by the natives. Alcmaeon, after killing his mother, fled from Argos and came to Psophis, which was still called Phegia after Phegeus, and married Alphesiboea, the daughter of Phegeus. Among the presents that he naturally gave her was the necklace. While he lived among the Arcadians his disease did not grow any better, so he had recourse to the oracle at Delphi . The Pythian priestess informed him that the only land into which the avenging spirit of Eriphyle would not follow him was the newest land, one brought up to light by the sea after the pollution of his mother's death. 8.24.9. On discovering the alluvial deposit of the Achelous he settled there, and took to wife Callirhoe, said by the Acarians to have been the daughter of Achelous. He had two sons, Acar and Amphoterus; after this Acar were called by their present name (so the story runs) the dwellers in this part of the mainland, who previously were called Curetes. Senseless passions shipwreck many men, and even more women. 9.23.6. About fifteen stades away from the city on the right is the sanctuary of Ptoan Apollo. We are told by Asius in his epic that Ptous, who gave a surname to Apollo and the name to the mountain, was a son of Athamas by Themisto. Before the expedition of the Macedonians under Alexander, in which Thebes was destroyed, there was here an oracle that never lied. Once too a mail of Europus, of the name of Mys, who was sent by Mardonius, inquired of the god in his own language, and the god too gave a response, not in Greek but in the Carian speech. 9.39.3. On the bank of the river there is a temple of Hercyna, in which is a maiden holding a goose in her arms. In the cave are the sources of the river and images standing, and serpents are coiled around their scepters. One might conjecture the images to be of Asclepius and Health, but they might be Trophonius and Hercyna, because they think that serpents are just as much sacred to Trophonius as to Asclepius. By the side of the river is the tomb of Arcesilaus, whose bones, they say, were carried back from Troy by Leitus. 9.39.4. The most famous things in the grove are a temple and image of Trophonius; the image, made by Praxiteles, is after the likeness of Asclepius. There is also a sanctuary of Demeter surnamed Europa, and a Zeus Rain-god in the open. If you go up to the oracle, and thence onwards up the mountain, you come to what is called the Maid's Hunting and a temple of King Zeus. This temple they have left half finished, either because of its size or because of the long succession of the wars. In a second temple are images of Cronus, Hera and Zeus. There is also a sanctuary of Apollo.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acharnai (ἀχαρναί, modern αχαρνές), former menidi (μενίδι) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
acropolis Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
acropolis of athens Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
agents Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
agora Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
alcmeon Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 668
alexander the great Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 94
altars Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
amphiaraos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68, 71
amphiaraus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 94, 95, 139
amphiareion Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 94, 95
amphiarus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 668
amphilochus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 139; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 668
anagyrous (ἀναγυροῦς) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
apollo ismenios Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
aristides of athens Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
arsinoe Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 94
athenagoras Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
athenians, consultation of oracle of amphiaraos at oropos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68, 71
athmonon (ἄθμονον) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
basilica of brauron Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
brauron (βραυρών, modern βραυρώνα) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
children Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
chresmologues (chresmologoi) Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 137, 139
christians, resurrection Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
christians, teaching Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
contests, divinatory Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 139
dedications Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
democracy Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68
divine will Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68
dream incubation Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68, 71
dreams Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68, 71
dreams and dream interpreters, incubation oracles Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 94, 95
dreams and dream interpreters Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 137
eisangelia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68
eleutherai (ἐλευθεραί), modern gyphtokastro (γυφτόκαστρο) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
enthusiastic prophecy Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 94, 95
erechtheion Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
euxenippos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68, 71
god, who raised jesus Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
gods, athena Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
gods, goddesses Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
gods, in dreams Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68, 71
gods Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
halimous (ἁλιμοῦς), modern alimos (άλιμος) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
healing sanctuaries Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
hypereides Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68
iconography, of amphiaraus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 668
incubation oracles Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 94, 95
inscriptions, dedications Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
interpretation Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
jews/jewish Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
katoptromancy, khaironeia, battle of' Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
kephale (κεφαλή) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
kroisos, king of lydia Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
lakiadai (λακιάδαι) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
lamptrai (λαμπτραί) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
lykourgos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68
mallos, oracle of Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 139
mantis, guild/family membership of manteis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 139
mantis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 137, 139
marathon (μαραθών, μαραθώνας) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
mardonios Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
memory, fountain of Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 95
mopsus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 139
musaeus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 137
myrrhinous (μυρρινούς) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
mys of europos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
oracles, as entertainment complexes Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 94
oropos, oracle of amphiaraos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68, 71
oropos (ὠρωπός), modern skala oropou (σκάλα ωρωπού) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
parthenon, pagan temple Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
paul (apostle) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
pausanias Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68, 71
phlya (φλύα), modern chalandri (χαλάνδρι) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
placentia, plataia, battle of Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
polyeuktos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 68
polytheism Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
porto raphti (πόρτο ράφτη), ancient prasiai (πρασίαι) and steiria (στειριά) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
prospalta (πρόσπαλτα), modern kalyvia thorikou (καλύβια θορικού) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
ptoion Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
ptolemy iv philopator Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 94
rhamnous (ῥαμνοῦς) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
riddles Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 139
salamis/salamina (σαλαμίνα) Breytenbach and Tzavella, Early Christianity in Athens, Attica, and Adjacent Areas (2022) 82
sparta/spartans Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
thebes Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 71
trophonius Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 95
wooden walls, oracle concerning Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 137