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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8713
Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 4.2857
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 182 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

182. And of it shaped a sickle, then relayed
2. Homer, Iliad, 5.53 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5.53. /did Atreus' son Menelaus slay with his sharp spear, even him the mighty hunter; for Artemis herself had taught him to smite all wild things that the mountain forest nurtureth. Yet in no wise did the archer Artemis avail him now, neither all that skill in archery wherein of old he excelled;
3. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 305-396, 512, 304 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

304. ἐμοὶ τραφείς τε καὶ καθιερωμένος;
4. Heraclitus of Ephesus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Euripides, Medea, 1390, 1389 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1389. The curse of our sons’ avenging spirit and of Justice
6. Sophocles, Ajax, 1390 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 1.383 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Artemidorus, Oneirocritica, 2.37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. New Testament, Luke, 9.62 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9.62. But Jesus said to him, "No one, having put his hand to the plow, and looking back, is fit for the Kingdom of God.
10. Iamblichus, Life of Pythagoras, 15 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

15. Conceiving, however, that the first attention which should be paid to men, is that which takes place through the senses; as when some one perceives beautiful figures and forms, or hears beautiful rythms and melodies, he established that to be the first erudition which subsists through music, and also through certain melodies and rythms, from which the remedies of human manners and passions are obtained, together with those harmonies of the powers of the soul which it possessed from the first. He likewise devised medicines calculated to repress and expel the diseases both of bodies and souls. And by Jupiter that which deserves to be mentioned above all these particulars is this, that he arranged and adapted for his disciples what are called apparatus and contrectations, divinely contriving mixtures of certain diatonic, chromatic, and euharmonic melodies, through which he easily transferred and circularly led the passions of the soul into a contrary direction, when they had recently and in an irrational and clandestine manner been formed; such as sorrow, rage, and pity, absurd emulation and fear, all-various desires, angers, and appetites, pride, supineness, and vehemence. For he corrected each of these by the rule of virtue, attempering them through appropriate melodies, as 44through certain salutary medicines. In the evening, likewise, when his disciples were retiring to sleep, he liberated them by these means from diurnal perturbations and tumults, and purified their intellective power from the influxive and effluxive waves of a corporeal nature; rendered their sleep quiet, and their dreams pleasing and prophetic. But when they again rose from their bed, he freed them from nocturnal heaviness, relaxation and torpor, through certain peculiar songs and modulations, produced either by simply striking the lyre, or employing the voice. Pythagoras, however, did not procure for himself a thing of this kind through instruments or the voice, but employing a certain ineffable divinity, and which it is difficult to apprehend, he extended his ears, and fixed his intellect in the sublime symphonies of the world, he alone hearing and understanding, as it appears, the universal harmony and consoce of the spheres, and the stars that are moved through them, and which produce a fuller and more intense melody than any thing effected by mortal sounds.[17] This melody also was the result of 45dissimilar and variously differing sounds, celerities, magnitudes, and intervals, arranged with reference 46to each other in a certain most musical ratio, and thus producing a most gentle, and at the same time variously beautiful motion and convolution. Being therefore irrigated as it were with this melody, having the reason of his intellect well arranged through it, and as I may say, exercised, he determined to exhibit certain images of these things to his disciples as much as possible, especially producing an imitation of them through instruments, and through the mere voice alone. For he conceived that by him alone, of all the inhabitants of the earth, the mundane sounds were understood and heard, and this from a natural fountain itself and root. He therefore thought himself worthy to be 47taught, and to learn something about the celestial orbs, and to be assimilated to them by desire and imitation, as being the only one on the earth adapted to this by the conformation of his body, through the dæmoniacal power that inspired him. But he apprehended that other men ought to be satisfied in looking to him, and the gifts he possessed, and in being benefited and corrected through images and examples, in consequence of their inability to comprehend truly the first and genuine archetypes of things. Just, indeed, as to those who are incapable of looking intently at the sun, through the transcendent splendor of his rays, we contrive to exhibit the eclipses of that luminary, either in the profundity of still water, or through melted pitch, or through some darkly-splendid mirror; sparing the imbecility of their eyes, and devising a method of representing a certain repercussive light, though less intense than its archetype, to those who are delighted with a thing of this kind. Empedocles also appears to have obscurely signified this about Pythagoras, and the illustrious and divinely-gifted conformation of his body above that of other men, when he says:“There was a man among them [i. e. among the Pythagoreans] who was transcendent in knowledge, who possessed the most ample stores of intellectual wealth, and who was in the most eminent degree the adjutor of the works of the wise. For when he extended all the powers of his intellect, he easily 48beheld every thing, as far as to ten or twenty ages of the human race.”For the words transcendent, and he beheld every thing, and the wealth of intellect, and the like, especially exhibit the illustrious nature of the conformation of his mind and body, and its superior accuracy in seeing, and hearing, and in intellectual perception.
11. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 4.475-4.829, 4.939-4.948, 4.1928-4.2125, 4.2441-4.2621, 4.2786-4.2856, 4.2858-4.2870, 4.2891-4.2942, 7.505-7.528, 7.862-7.918 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

12. Heraclitus Lesbius, Fragments, None

13. Various, Anthologia Latina, 9.525



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aion Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 132
alphabet Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155
anaphora Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 156, 157, 158
anthropogony Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
aphrodite Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124; Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82
artemis Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82, 131, 132, 133
assimilation Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 131, 132
blood Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
corpus hermeticum Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82
creator-god Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 132
cyprian of antioch Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 269
dactyls Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
daimon of the dead Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
deukalion Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
dionysos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
divine appellations/attributes\n, (and) selection, selection criteria Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 156
eco, umberto Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155
egypt Geljon and Vos, Rituals in Early Christianity: New Perspectives on Tradition and Transformation (2020) 269
erinyes Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
eros Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 132, 133
fire Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82
form Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 131, 132
hekate-selene-artemis Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82, 131, 132, 133
hekate Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82, 131, 132, 133
helios Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82, 131, 132
hermes Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 132
hymns, alphabetical Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155
hymns, magical Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155, 156, 157, 158
hymns, orphic Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 158
hymns Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155, 156, 157, 158
image Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 131
incantations Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 157, 158
jesus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
justice Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
juxtaposition Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155, 158
klaudianus Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 131
kronos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
looking back Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
magic Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155, 156, 157, 158; Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 131, 132, 133
many-formed Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 131
many-named Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 131
mithras Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82
mithras liturgy Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82
mixture Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82
mysteries Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
nature Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82, 131
numbers Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 156
ouranos Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
papyri graecae magicae hymns Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82, 131, 132, 133
performance, oral Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155, 156, 157
pre-socratics Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82
psalms Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155
pyrrha/aia Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
pythagoras Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124
real world\n, (of) divine appellations/attributes Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155, 156, 157, 158
rhythm Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 155, 157
selene Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82, 131, 132, 133
spirit Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 82, 133
star Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 131
structure Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 156, 157
uncountability Laemmle, Lists and Catalogues in Ancient Literature and Beyond: Towards a Poetics of Enumeration (2021) 156
zeus' Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 133
zeus Bremmer, Greek Religion and Culture, the Bible, and the Ancient Near East (2008) 124