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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



8953
Papyri, P.Oxy., 71.4808
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 5.12 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Polybius, Histories, 2.61, 12.15.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2.61. 1.  To take another instance, Phylarchus, while narrating with exaggeration and elaboration the calamities of the Mantineans, evidently deeming it a historian's duty to lay stress on criminal acts,,2.  does not even make mention of the noble conduct of the Megalopolitans at nearly the same date, as if it were rather the proper function of history to chronicle the commission of sins than to call attention to right and honourable actions,,3.  or as if readers of his memoirs would be improved less by account of good conduct which we should emulate than by criminal conduct which we should shun.,4.  He tells us how Cleomenes took the city, and before doing any damage to it, sent at once a post to the Megalopolitans at Messene offering to hand back their own native country to them uninjured on condition of their throwing in their lot with him. So much he lets us know, wishing to show the magimity of Cleomenes and his moderation to his enemies,,5.  and he goes on to tell how when the letter was being read out they would not allow the reader to continue until the end, and how they came very near stoning the letter-bearers.,6.  So far he makes everything quite clear to us, but he deprives us of what should follow and what is the special virtue of history, I mean praise and honourable mention of conduct noteworthy for its excellence.,7.  And yet he had an opportunity ready to his hand here. For if we consider those men to be good who by speeches and resolutions only expose themselves to war for the sake of their friends and allies, and if we bestow not only praise but lavish thanks and gifts on those who have suffered their country to be laid waste and their city besieged,,8.  what should we feel for the Megalopolitans? Surely the deepest reverence and the highest regard.,9.  In the first place they left their lands at the mercy of Cleomenes, next they utterly lost their city owing to their support of the Achaeans,,10.  and finally, when quite unexpectedly it was put in their power to get it back undamaged, they preferred to lose their land, their tombs, their temples, their homes, and their possessions, all in fact that is dearest to men, rather than break faith with their allies.,11.  What more noble conduct has there ever been or could there be? To what could an author with more advantage call the attention of his readers, and how could he better stimulate them to loyalty to their engagements and to true and faithful comradeship?,12.  But Phylarchus, blind, as it seems to me, to the most noble actions and those most worthy of an author's attention, has not said a single word on the subject. 12.15.9.  But Timaeus, blinded by his own malice, has chronicled with hostility and exaggeration the defects of Agathocles and has entirely omitted to mention his shining qualities, being unaware that it is just as mendacious for a writer to conceal what did occur as to report what did not occur. I myself, while refraining in order to spare him from giving full expression to my hostility to Timaeus, have omitted nothing less to the object I had in view. . . . .
3. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Letter To Pompeius Geminus, 4-6, 3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Arrian, Anabasis of Alexander, 4.14.3-4.14.4 (1st cent. CE

4.14.3. Καλλισθένην δὲ Ἀριστόβουλος μὲν λέγει δεδεμένον ἐν πέδαις Aristob. fr. 26 ξυμπεριάγεσθαι τῇ στρατιᾷ, ἔπειτα νόσῳ τελευτῆσαι, Πτολεμαῖος δὲ ὁ Λάγου στρεβλωθέντα καὶ κρεμασθέντα Ptolem. fr. 14 θέντα ἀποθανεῖν. οὕτως οὐδὲ οἱ πάνυ πιστοὶ ἐς τὴν ἀφήγησιν καὶ ξυγγενόμενοι ἐν τῷ τότε Ἀλεξάνδρῳ ὑπὲρ τῶν γνωρίμων τε καὶ οὐ λαθόντων σφᾶς ὅπως ἐπράχθη ξύμφωνα ἀνέγραψαν. 4.14.4. πολλὰ δὲ καὶ ἄλλα ὑπὲρ τούτων αὐτῶν ἄλλοι ἄλλως ἀφηγήσαντο, ἀλλʼ ἐμοὶ ταῦτα ἀποχρῶντα ἔστω ἀναγεγραμμένα. ταῦτα μὲν δὴ οὐ πολλῷ ὕστερον πραχθέντα ἐγὼ ἐν τοῖσδε τοῖς ἀμφὶ Κλεῖτον ξυνενεχθεῖσιν Ἀλεξάνδρῳ ἀνέγραψα, τούτοις μᾶλλόν τι οἰκεῖα ὑπολαβὼν ἐς τὴν ἀφήγησιν.
5. Plutarch, On The Malice of Herodotus, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Plutarch, Dion, 36.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, Pericles, 13.16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Lucian, How To Write History, 12-13, 39-41, 61, 63, 7, 10 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Curtius Rufus, Historiae Alexandri Magni, 8.8.19

8.8.19. Nam tuum Callisthenen, cui uni vir videris, quia latro es, scio, cur produci velis: ut coram his probra, quae in me modo iecisti, modo audisti, illius quoque ore referantur. Quem, si Macedo esset, tecum introduxissem, dignissimum te discipulo magistrum:


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander iii of macedon vii Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
alternatives Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
ancestors Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
antipater Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
callisthenes of olynthus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
character (plutarchs and readers concern with) Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
chares of mytilene Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
criticism Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
curtius rufus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
diodorus of sicily Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
envy Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
explanations Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
external jurymen Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
flattery, flatterers Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
fortune, contrasted with virtue Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
fortune, mis- Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
fortune, success/failure as result of Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
hermolaus Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
historiography Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
katēgoros Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
landucci, franca Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
macedonian judicial procedures vii Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
moderation Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
omissions Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159
pages conspiracy Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
plutarch Amendola, The Demades Papyrus (P.Berol. inv. 13045): A New Text with Commentary (2022) 119
style/stylistic (interest in)' Chrysanthou, Plutarch's 'Parallel Lives': Narrative Technique and Moral Judgement (2018) 159