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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11699
Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 5.6
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 114, 22, 31-32, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. From the Heliconian Muses let me sing:
2. Homer, Iliad, 4.26 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4.26. / Most dread son of Cronos, what a word hast thou said! How art thou minded to render my labour vain and of none effect, and the sweat that I sweated in my toil,—aye, and my horses twain waxed weary with my summoning the host for the bane of Priam and his sons? Do thou as thou wilt; but be sure we other gods assent not all thereto.
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 273-297, 272 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Herodotus, Histories, 2.63, 4.186 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.63. When the people go to Heliopolis and Buto, they offer sacrifice only. At Papremis sacrifice is offered and rites performed just as elsewhere; but when the sun is setting, a few of the priests hover about the image, while most of them go and stand in the entrance to the temple with clubs of wood in their hands; others, more than a thousand men fulfilling vows, who also carry wooden clubs, stand in a mass opposite. ,The image of the god, in a little gilded wooden shrine, they carry away on the day before this to another sacred building. The few who are left with the image draw a four-wheeled wagon conveying the shrine and the image that is in the shrine; the others stand in the space before the doors and do not let them enter, while the vow-keepers, taking the side of the god, strike them, who defend themselves. ,A fierce fight with clubs breaks out there, and they are hit on their heads, and many, I expect, even die from their wounds; although the Egyptians said that nobody dies. ,The natives say that they made this assembly a custom from the following incident: the mother of Ares lived in this temple; Ares had been raised apart from her and came, when he grew up, wishing to visit his mother; but as her attendants kept him out and would not let him pass, never having seen him before, Ares brought men from another town, manhandled the attendants, and went in to his mother. From this, they say, this hitting for Ares became a custom in the festival. 4.186. Thus from Egypt to the Tritonian lake, the Libyans are nomads that eat meat and drink milk; for the same reason as the Egyptians too profess, they will not touch the flesh of cows; and they rear no swine. ,The women of Cyrene, too, consider it wrong to eat cows' flesh, because of the Isis of Egypt; and they even honor her with fasts and festivals; and the Barcaean women refuse to eat swine too, as well as cows.
5. Plato, Gorgias, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

493a. and we really, it may be, are dead; in fact I once heard sages say that we are now dead, and the body is our tomb, and the part of the soul in which we have desires is liable to be over-persuaded and to vacillate to and fro, and so some smart fellow, a Sicilian, I daresay, or Italian, made a fable in which—by a play of words—he named this part, as being so impressionable and persuadable, a jar, and the thoughtless he called uninitiate:
6. Plato, Protagoras, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

357d. whatever can it be, and what do you call it? Tell us. If on the spur of the moment we had replied, Ignorance, you would have laughed us to scorn: but now if you laugh at us you will be laughing at yourselves as well. For you have admitted that it is from defect of knowledge that men err, when they do err, in their choice of pleasures and pains—that is, in the choice of good and evil; and from defect not merely of knowledge but of the knowledge which you have now admitted also to be that of measurement. And surely you know well enough for yourselve
7. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

363d. they entertain the time henceforth with wine, as if the fairest meed of virtue were an everlasting drunk. And others extend still further the rewards of virtue from the gods. For they say that the children’s children of the pious and oath-keeping man and his race thereafter never fail. Such and such-like are their praises of justice. But the impious and the unjust they bury in mud in the house of Hades and compel them to fetch water in a sieve, and, while they still live
8. Cicero, On Divination, 1.116 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.116. Hic magna quaedam exoritur, neque ea naturalis, sed artificiosa somniorum Antiphontis interpretatio eodemque modo et oraculorum et vaticinationum sunt enim explanatores, ut grammatici poe+tarum . Nam ut aurum et argentum, aes, ferrum frustra natura divina genuisset, nisi eadem docuisset, quem ad modum ad eorum venas perveniretur, nec fruges terrae bacasve arborum cum utilitate ulla generi humano dedisset, nisi earum cultus et conditiones tradidisset, materiave quicquam iuvaret, nisi consectionis eius fabricam haberemus, sic cum omni utilitate, quam di hominibus dederunt, ars aliqua coniuncta est, per quam illa utilitas percipi possit. Item igitur somniis, vaticinationibus, oraclis, quod erant multa obscura, multa ambigua, explanationes adhibitae sunt interpretum. 1.116. At this point it is pertinent to mention Antiphons well-known theory of the interpretation of dreams. His view is that the interpreters of dreams depending upon technical skill and not upon inspiration. He has the same view as to the interpretation of oracles and of frenzied utterances; for they all have their interpreters, just as poets have their commentators. Now it is clear that divine nature would have done a vain thing if she had merely created iron, copper, silver, and gold and had not shown us how to reach the veins in which those metals lie; the gift of field crops and orchard fruits would have been useless to the human race without a knowledge of how to cultivate them and prepare them for food; and building material would be of no service without the carpenters art to convert it into lumber. So it is with everything that the gods have given for the advantage of mankind, there has been joined some art whereby that advantage may be turned to account. The same is true of dreams, prophecies, and oracles: since many of them were obscure and doubtful, resort was had to the skill of professional interpreters.
9. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10.31.9, 10.31.11 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.31.9. The women beyond Penthesileia are carrying water in broken pitchers; one is depicted as in the bloom of youth, the other is already advanced in years. There is no separate inscription on either woman, but there is one common to the pair, which states that they are of the number of the uninitiated. 10.31.11. There is also in the painting a jar, and an old man, with a boy and two women. One of these, who is young, is under the rock; the other is beside the old man and of a like age to his. The others are carrying water, but you will guess that the old woman's water-jar is broken. All that remains of the water in the sherd she is pouring out again into the jar. We inferred that these people too were of those who had held of no account the rites at Eleusis . For the Greeks of an earlier period looked upon the Eleusinian mysteries as being as much higher than all other religious acts as gods are higher than heroes.
10. Sextus, Against The Mathematicians, 9.56 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

11. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 8.33, 9.55 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8.33. Right has the force of an oath, and that is why Zeus is called the God of Oaths. Virtue is harmony, and so are health and all good and God himself; this is why they say that all things are constructed according to the laws of harmony. The love of friends is just concord and equality. We should not pay equal worship to gods and heroes, but to the gods always, with reverent silence, in white robes, and after purification, to the heroes only from midday onwards. Purification is by cleansing, baptism and lustration, and by keeping clean from all deaths and births and all pollution, and abstaining from meat and flesh of animals that have died, mullets, gurnards, eggs and egg-sprung animals, beans, and the other abstinences prescribed by those who perform rites in the sanctuaries. 9.55. The works of his which survive are these:The Art of Controversy.of Wrestling.On Mathematics.of the State.of Ambition.of Virtues.of the Ancient Order of Things.On the Dwellers in Hades.of the Misdeeds of Mankind.A Book of Precepts.of Forensic Speech for a Fee, two books of opposing arguments.This is the list of his works. Moreover there is a dialogue which Plato wrote upon him.Philochorus says that, when he was on a voyage to Sicily, his ship went down, and that Euripides hints at this in his Ixion. According to some his death occurred, when he was on a journey, at nearly ninety years of age
12. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.16 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.16. 16.Theopompus likewise narrates things similar to these, viz. that a certain Magnesian came from Asia to Delphi; a man very rich, and abounding in cattle, and that he was accustomed every year to make many and magnificent sacrifices to the Gods, partly through the abundance of his possessions, and partly through piety and wishing to please the Gods. But being thus disposed, he came to the divinity at Delphi, bringing with him a hecatomb for the God, and magnificently honouring Apollo, he consulted his oracle. Conceiving also that he worshipped the Gods in a manner more beautiful than that of all other men, he asked the Pythian deity who the man was that, with the greatest promptitude, and in the best manner, venerated divinity, and |53 made the most acceptable sacrifices, conceiving that on this occasion the God would deem him to be pre-eminent. The Pythian deity however answered, that Clearchus, who dwelt in Methydrium, a town of Arcadia, worshipped the Gods in a way surpassing that of all other men. But the Magnesian being astonished, was desirous of seeing Clearchus, and of learning from him the manner in which he performed his sacrifices. Swiftly, therefore, betaking himself to Methydrium, in the first place, indeed, he despised the smallness and vileness of the town, conceiving that neither any private person, nor even the whole city, could honour the Gods more magnificently and more beautifully than he did. Meeting, however, with the man, he thought fit to ask him after what manner he reverenced the Gods. But Clearchus answered him, that he diligently sacrificed to them at proper times in every month at the new moon, crowning and adorning the statues of Hermes and Hecate, and the other sacred images which were left to us by our ancestors, and that he also honoured the Gods with frankincense, and sacred wafers and cakes. He likewise said, that he performed public sacrifices annually, omitting no festive day; and that in these festivals he worshipped the Gods, not by slaying oxen, nor by cutting victims into fragments, but that he sacrificed whatever he might casually meet with, sedulously offering the first-fruits to the Gods of all the vegetable productions of the seasons, and of all the fruits with which he was supplied. He added, that some of these he placed before the [statues of the] Gods,6 but that he burnt others on their altars; and that, being studious of frugality, he avoided the sacrificing of oxen. SPAN
13. Bacchylides, Odes, 3.85

14. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, None

15. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 3.7, 4.4-4.5, 5.7-5.10, 6.7-6.8, 6.10, 7.3-7.4, 7.9, 9.2, 9.5, 9.11-9.12, 12.5, 13.5-13.6, 18.5, 18.14, 20.2-20.3, 22.12, 23.1-23.3, 23.5, 25.13, 26.8



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
afterlife, punishment in Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 557, 558
afterlife, ritual absolution and Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 557, 558
afterlife Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 557, 558
allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the derveni papyrus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
antiphon Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
audience Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 138
authority, poetic authority Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
cakes (offerings) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
clients, of the da Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
cosmology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
delphi, polygnotus paintings Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 557
demeter Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 138
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 138
derveni papyrus, first columns Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
derveni papyrus Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 557, 558
derveni poem Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 138
derveni poet Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
destiny, of souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
diviners Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
dreams, interpretation of oracular dreams Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 138
earth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
eleusinian mysteries Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 557, 558
erinyes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85; Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 558
eumenides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
euripides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
experts, expertise, derveni author as expert Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 138
expiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
hades, terrors of hades Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 138
heraclitus, on the erinyes Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 558
hesiod Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
homer Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
indetermined Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
initiates, hope of the initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 138
initiations, fees for Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
initiations Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 138
knowledge, acquired in the initiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
libations Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
muses Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 8
mystery cults Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
offerings (bloodless) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
officiants (in the mysteries) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
olympus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
orpheus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 85, 138
orphic, see hieros logos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 8
orphic poems Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 138
orphic theogonies Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
papyri, conservation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 12
papyri, glass Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 12
papyri, herculaneum Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 12
papyri, ir-imaging Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 12
papyri, multispectral imaging Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 12
papyri, opening, separation, unrolling Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 12
papyri, restoration Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 12
plato, on ritual absolution Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 557, 558
plato Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
polygnotus, underworld painting Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 557
profane Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 138
professionals, of the sacred Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
protagoras Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
punishment, in the afterlife Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 557, 558
rhea Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
riddles Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85, 138
sacrifice, funerary offerings Wolfsdorf, Early Greek Ethics (2020) 558
sacrifices Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
sky Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
socrates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
swallowing, zeus swallowing of the phallus of uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
tiresias (in euripides bacchae) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
truth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
wisdom (expertise), in theogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48
wisdom (expertise) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 85
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 48, 85, 138
zeus new creation of the world Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
δρώμενα Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
λεγόμενα' Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138