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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11699
Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 22.12
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 122, 195, 306, 371-372, 886, 901, 907, 912-913, 915, 918, 921, 121 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

121. The streams, the swelling sea and up on high
2. Homer, Iliad, 5.371, 6.165, 18.396 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5.371. /but fair Aphrodite flung herself upon the knees of her mother Dione. She clasped her daughter in her arms, and stroked her with her hand and spake to her, saying:Who now of the sons of heaven, dear child, hath entreated thee thus wantonly, as though thou wert working some evil before the face of all? 6.165. /seeing he was minded to lie with me in love against my will. So she spake, and wrath gat hold upon the king to hear that word. To slay him he forbare, for his soul had awe of that; but he sent him to Lycia, and gave him baneful tokens, graving in a folded tablet many signs and deadly 18.396. /even she that saved me when pain was come upon me after I had fallen afar through the will of my shameless mother, that was fain to hide me away by reason of my lameness. Then had I suffered woes in heart, had not Eurynome and Thetis received me into their bosom—Eurynome, daughter of backward-flowing Oceanus.
3. Homer, Odyssey, 11.205, 19.395 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Herodotus, Histories, 1.105 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.105. From there they marched against Egypt : and when they were in the part of Syria called Palestine, Psammetichus king of Egypt met them and persuaded them with gifts and prayers to come no further. ,So they turned back, and when they came on their way to the city of Ascalon in Syria, most of the Scythians passed by and did no harm, but a few remained behind and plundered the temple of Heavenly Aphrodite. ,This temple, I discover from making inquiry, is the oldest of all the temples of the goddess, for the temple in Cyprus was founded from it, as the Cyprians themselves say; and the temple on Cythera was founded by Phoenicians from this same land of Syria . ,But the Scythians who pillaged the temple, and all their descendants after them, were afflicted by the goddess with the “female” sickness: and so the Scythians say that they are afflicted as a consequence of this and also that those who visit Scythian territory see among them the condition of those whom the Scythians call “Hermaphrodites”.
5. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.23.7, 5.75.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.23.7.  And since he had become conversant with the teachings of the Egyptians about the gods, he transferred the birth of the ancient Osiris to more recent times, and, out of regard for the descendants of Cadmus, instituted a new initiation, in the ritual of which the initiates were given the account that Dionysus had been born of Semelê and Zeus. And the people observed these initiatory rites, partly because they were deceived through their ignorance, partly because they were attracted to them by the trustworthiness of Orpheus and his reputation in such matters, and most of all because they were glad to receive the god as a Greek, which, as has been said, is what he was considered to be. 5.75.4.  As for Dionysus, the myths state that he discovered the vine and its cultivation, and also how to make wine and to store away many of the autumn fruits and thus to provide mankind with the use of them as food over a long time. This god was born in Crete, men say, of Zeus and Persephonê, and Orpheus has handed down the tradition in the initiatory rites that he was torn in pieces by the Titans. And the fact is that there have been several who bore the name Dionysus, regarding whom we have given a detailed account at greater length in connection with the more appropriate period of time.
6. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 6.114 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Athenagoras, Apology Or Embassy For The Christians, 20.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 2.15-2.18, 2.16.1-2.16.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

9. Hippolytus, Refutation of All Heresies, 5.20.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

10. Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 8.6, 10.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Arnobius, Against The Gentiles, 5.21 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

12. Origen, Against Celsus, 1.17, 1.25, 4.48 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

1.17. In what follows, Celsus, assailing the Mosaic history, finds fault with those who give it a tropical and allegorical signification. And here one might say to this great man, who inscribed upon his own work the title of a True Discourse, Why, good sir, do you make it a boast to have it recorded that the gods should engage in such adventures as are described by your learned poets and philosophers, and be guilty of abominable intrigues, and of engaging in wars against their own fathers, and of cutting off their secret parts, and should dare to commit and to suffer such enormities; while Moses, who gives no such accounts respecting God, nor even regarding the holy angels, and who relates deeds of far less atrocity regarding men (for in his writings no one ever ventured to commit such crimes as Kronos did against Uranus, or Zeus against his father, or that of the father of men and gods, who had intercourse with his own daughter), should be considered as having deceived those who were placed under his laws, and to have led them into error? And here Celsus seems to me to act somewhat as Thrasymachus the Platonic philosopher did, when he would not allow Socrates to answer regarding justice, as he wished, but said, Take care not to say that utility is justice, or duty, or anything of that kind. For in like manner Celsus assails (as he thinks) the Mosaic histories, and finds fault with those who understand them allegorically, at the same time bestowing also some praise upon those who do so, to the effect that they are more impartial (than those who do not); and thus, as it were, he prevents by his cavils those who are able to show the true state of the case from offering such a defense as they would wish to offer. 1.25. And perhaps there is a danger as great as that which degrades the name of God, or of the Good, to improper objects, in changing the name of God according to a secret system, and applying those which belong to inferior beings to greater, and vice versa. And I do not dwell on this, that when the name of Zeus is uttered, there is heard at the same time that of the son of Kronos and Rhea, and the husband of Hera, and brother of Poseidon, and father of Athene, and Artemis, who was guilty of incest with his own daughter Persephone; or that Apollo immediately suggests the son of Leto and Zeus, and the brother of Artemis, and half-brother of Hermes; and so with all the other names invented by these wise men of Celsus, who are the parents of these opinions, and the ancient theologians of the Greeks. For what are the grounds for deciding that he should on the one hand be properly called Zeus, and yet on the other should not have Kronos for his father and Rhea for his mother? And the same argument applies to all the others that are called gods. But this charge does not at all apply to those who, for some mysterious reason, refer the word Sabaoth, or Adonai, or any of the other names to the (true) God. And when one is able to philosophize about the mystery of names, he will find much to say respecting the titles of the angels of God, of whom one is called Michael, and another Gabriel, and another Raphael, appropriately to the duties which they discharge in the world, according to the will of the God of all things. And a similar philosophy of names applies also to our Jesus, whose name has already been seen, in an unmistakeable manner, to have expelled myriads of evil spirits from the souls and bodies (of men), so great was the power which it exerted upon those from whom the spirits were driven out. And while still upon the subject of names, we have to mention that those who are skilled in the use of incantations, relate that the utterance of the same incantation in its proper language can accomplish what the spell professes to do; but when translated into any other tongue, it is observed to become inefficacious and feeble. And thus it is not the things signified, but the qualities and peculiarities of words, which possess a certain power for this or that purpose. And so on such grounds as these we defend the conduct of the Christians, when they struggle even to death to avoid calling God by the name of Zeus, or to give Him a name from any other language. For they either use the common name - God - indefinitely, or with some such addition as that of the Maker of all things, the Creator of heaven and earth - He who sent down to the human race those good men, to whose names that of God being added, certain mighty works are wrought among men. And much more besides might be said on the subject of names, against those who think that we ought to be indifferent as to our use of them. And if the remark of Plato in the Philebus should surprise us, when he says, My fear, O Protagoras, about the names of the gods is no small one, seeing Philebus in his discussion with Socrates had called pleasure a god, how shall we not rather approve the piety of the Christians, who apply none of the names used in the mythologies to the Creator of the world? And now enough on this subject for the present. 4.48. In the next place, as if he had devoted himself solely to the manifestation of his hatred and dislike of the Jewish and Christian doctrine, he says: The more modest of Jewish and Christian writers give all these things an allegorical meaning; and, Because they are ashamed of these things, they take refuge in allegory. Now one might say to him, that if we must admit fables and fictions, whether written with a concealed meaning or with any other object, to be shameful narratives when taken in their literal acceptation, of what histories can this be said more truly than of the Grecian? In these histories, gods who are sons castrate the gods who are their fathers, and gods who are parents devour their own children, and a goddess-mother gives to the father of gods and men a stone to swallow instead of his own son, and a father has intercourse with his daughter, and a wife binds her own husband, having as her allies in the work the brother of the fettered god and his own daughter! But why should I enumerate these absurd stories of the Greeks regarding their gods, which are most shameful in themselves, even though invested with an allegorical meaning? (Take the instance) where Chrysippus of Soli, who is considered to be an ornament of the Stoic sect, on account of his numerous and learned treatises, explains a picture at Samos, in which Juno was represented as committing unspeakable abominations with Jupiter. This reverend philosopher says in his treatises, that matter receives the spermatic words of the god, and retains them within herself, in order to ornament the universe. For in the picture at Samos Juno represents matter, and Jupiter god. Now it is on account of these, and of countless other similar fables, that we would not even in word call the God of all things Jupiter, or the sun Apollo, or the moon Diana. But we offer to the Creator a worship which is pure, and speak with religious respect of His noble works of creation, not contaminating even in word the things of God; approving of the language of Plato in the Philebus, who would not admit that pleasure was a goddess, so great is my reverence, Protarchus, he says, for the very names of the gods. We verily entertain such reverence for the name of God, and for His noble works of creation, that we would not, even under pretext of an allegorical meaning, admit any fable which might do injury to the young.
13. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 5.565, 6.155-6.157 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

14. Bacchylides, Odes, 3.85

15. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 10, 149, 15, 17-18, 20-21, 306, 312, 327, 36, 398, 578, 589, 8, 87, 89, 1

16. Orphic Hymns., Hymni, 30.6-30.7

17. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 5.6, 5.10, 9.2, 9.5, 12.5, 13.4, 15.6, 16.3, 18.5, 18.14, 20.2-20.3, 21.5, 21.7-21.10, 23.2, 23.5, 25.13, 26.8-26.9



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
air Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120
aither, ejaculation of aither by uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
anaxagoras Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
aphrodite Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
aphrodites birth by the ejaculation of zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
aphrodites births Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
christianity de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 81
cold (in cosmogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 137
cosmos Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
cronus, etymologized as κρούων νοῦς Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120
cronus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
death of dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
delphi de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 81
demeter Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 120, 137; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 81
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120, 137
derveni papyrus, first columns Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
derveni poem Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
derveni poet Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60
destiny, of souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
dionysus, birth of dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
dionysus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
earth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 111
eros Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60
etymology Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
eudemian theogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
gaia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120
gods, births of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 137
gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 111
gods as elements, names of the gods Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
harmonia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
heat Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
helios Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
hera Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 120
hesiod Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 111, 120
hestia Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
identified with zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
initiates, hope of the initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
kingship, divine Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
knowledge, acquired in the initiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
light (in cosmogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
metis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60
mixing (of elements) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120
moon Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
muses de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 8
mystery cults Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120, 137
night (goddess) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
nous that ὁρίζεται (etymology of uranus) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
orpheus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120, 137
orphic, see hieros logos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 8
orphic myths Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
orphic poems Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120, 137
orphic rites Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
particles (in cosmogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120
peitho (persuasion) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
persephone Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
persephones birth Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 137
professionals, of the sacred Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
protogonos (orphic god) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
pythagoreanism Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
rhapsodies (orphic poem) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 111
rhea Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 120, 137
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
selene Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60
stars (in cosmogony and theogony) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
sun Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
swallowing, zeus swallowing of the phallus of uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
tethys Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60
themis Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60
titan's crime" '328.0_111.0@νοῦς (allegory of zeus) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
typhon Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60
uranus, euphronides (son of euphrone = night) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120
uranus castration, as first-born (πρωτόγονος) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
uranus castration, etymologized as νοῦς that ὁρίζεται Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
uranus phallus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120
zeus, as ἀήρ and νοῦς Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 111, 120, 137
zeus incest with his mother Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60, 120, 137
zeus mind Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 60
zeus new creation of the world Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
αἰωρεῖσθαι Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
δρώμενα Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
θόρνηι Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
κρούων νous (etymology of cronus) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120
λεγόμενα Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 137
νοῦς-ἀήρ Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111, 120
νοῦς (allegory of zeus) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
νῦν ἐόντα, τὰ (the things-that-are-now) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
ἀήρ Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111
ἐόντα, τὰ (the things-that-are) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 120
ὁρίζω' Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 111