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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11699
Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 13.5-13.6
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

15 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Genesis, 15.2 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

15.2. וְאֶת־הַחִתִּי וְאֶת־הַפְּרִזִּי וְאֶת־הָרְפָאִים׃ 15.2. וַיֹּאמֶר אַבְרָם אֲדֹנָי יֱהוִה מַה־תִּתֶּן־לִי וְאָנֹכִי הוֹלֵךְ עֲרִירִי וּבֶן־מֶשֶׁק בֵּיתִי הוּא דַּמֶּשֶׂק אֱלִיעֶזֶר׃ 15.2. And Abram said: ‘O Lord GOD, what wilt Thou give me, seeing I go hence childless, and he that shall be possessor of my house is Eliezer of Damascus?’"
2. Herodotus, Histories, 2.63, 4.186 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2.63. When the people go to Heliopolis and Buto, they offer sacrifice only. At Papremis sacrifice is offered and rites performed just as elsewhere; but when the sun is setting, a few of the priests hover about the image, while most of them go and stand in the entrance to the temple with clubs of wood in their hands; others, more than a thousand men fulfilling vows, who also carry wooden clubs, stand in a mass opposite. ,The image of the god, in a little gilded wooden shrine, they carry away on the day before this to another sacred building. The few who are left with the image draw a four-wheeled wagon conveying the shrine and the image that is in the shrine; the others stand in the space before the doors and do not let them enter, while the vow-keepers, taking the side of the god, strike them, who defend themselves. ,A fierce fight with clubs breaks out there, and they are hit on their heads, and many, I expect, even die from their wounds; although the Egyptians said that nobody dies. ,The natives say that they made this assembly a custom from the following incident: the mother of Ares lived in this temple; Ares had been raised apart from her and came, when he grew up, wishing to visit his mother; but as her attendants kept him out and would not let him pass, never having seen him before, Ares brought men from another town, manhandled the attendants, and went in to his mother. From this, they say, this hitting for Ares became a custom in the festival. 4.186. Thus from Egypt to the Tritonian lake, the Libyans are nomads that eat meat and drink milk; for the same reason as the Egyptians too profess, they will not touch the flesh of cows; and they rear no swine. ,The women of Cyrene, too, consider it wrong to eat cows' flesh, because of the Isis of Egypt; and they even honor her with fasts and festivals; and the Barcaean women refuse to eat swine too, as well as cows.
3. Chrysippus, Fragments, 2.1067 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

4. Chrysippus, Fragments, 2.1067 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

5. Chrysippus, Fragments, 2.1067 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

6. Chrysippus, Fragments, 2.1067 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

7. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.64 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.64. now these immoral fables enshrined a decidedly clever scientific theory. Their meaning was that the highest element of celestial ether or fire, which by itself generates all things, is devoid of that bodily part which requires union with another for the work of procreation. By Saturn again they denoted that being who maintains the course and revolution of seasons and periods of time, et deity actually so designated in Greek, for Saturn's Greek name is Kronos, which is the same as chronos, a space of time. The Latin designation 'Saturn' on the other hand is due to the fact that he is 'saturated' or 'satiated with years' (anni); the fable is that he was in the habit of devouring his sons — meaning that Time devours the ages and gorges himself insatiably with the years that are past. Saturn was bound by Jove in order that Time's courses might not be unlimited, and that Jove might fetter him by the bonds of the stars. But Jupiter himself — the name means 'the helping father,' whom with a change of inflexion we style Jove, from iuvare 'to help'; the poets call him 'father of gods and men,' and our ancestors entitled him 'best and greatest,' putting the title 'best,' that is most beneficent, before that of 'greatest,' because universal beneficence is greater, or at least more lovable, than the possession of great wealth —
8. Philo of Alexandria, On Giants, 7, 6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. And when the angels of God saw the daughters of men that they were beautiful, they took unto themselves wives of all of them whom they Chose." Those beings, whom other philosophers call demons, Moses usually calls angels; and they are souls hovering in the air.
9. Philo of Alexandria, On Sobriety, 17, 16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.139, 8.33 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.139. For through some parts it passes as a hold or containing force, as is the case with our bones and sinews; while through others it passes as intelligence, as in the ruling part of the soul. Thus, then, the whole world is a living being, endowed with soul and reason, and having aether for its ruling principle: so says Antipater of Tyre in the eighth book of his treatise On the Cosmos. Chrysippus in the first book of his work On Providence and Posidonius in his book On the Gods say that the heaven, but Cleanthes that the sun, is the ruling power of the world. Chrysippus, however, in the course of the same work gives a somewhat different account, namely, that it is the purer part of the aether; the same which they declare to be preeminently God and always to have, as it were in sensible fashion, pervaded all that is in the air, all animals and plants, and also the earth itself, as a principle of cohesion. 8.33. Right has the force of an oath, and that is why Zeus is called the God of Oaths. Virtue is harmony, and so are health and all good and God himself; this is why they say that all things are constructed according to the laws of harmony. The love of friends is just concord and equality. We should not pay equal worship to gods and heroes, but to the gods always, with reverent silence, in white robes, and after purification, to the heroes only from midday onwards. Purification is by cleansing, baptism and lustration, and by keeping clean from all deaths and births and all pollution, and abstaining from meat and flesh of animals that have died, mullets, gurnards, eggs and egg-sprung animals, beans, and the other abstinences prescribed by those who perform rites in the sanctuaries.
11. Papyri, Papyri Graecae Magicae, 4.1331-4.1389 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

12. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.16 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.16. 16.Theopompus likewise narrates things similar to these, viz. that a certain Magnesian came from Asia to Delphi; a man very rich, and abounding in cattle, and that he was accustomed every year to make many and magnificent sacrifices to the Gods, partly through the abundance of his possessions, and partly through piety and wishing to please the Gods. But being thus disposed, he came to the divinity at Delphi, bringing with him a hecatomb for the God, and magnificently honouring Apollo, he consulted his oracle. Conceiving also that he worshipped the Gods in a manner more beautiful than that of all other men, he asked the Pythian deity who the man was that, with the greatest promptitude, and in the best manner, venerated divinity, and |53 made the most acceptable sacrifices, conceiving that on this occasion the God would deem him to be pre-eminent. The Pythian deity however answered, that Clearchus, who dwelt in Methydrium, a town of Arcadia, worshipped the Gods in a way surpassing that of all other men. But the Magnesian being astonished, was desirous of seeing Clearchus, and of learning from him the manner in which he performed his sacrifices. Swiftly, therefore, betaking himself to Methydrium, in the first place, indeed, he despised the smallness and vileness of the town, conceiving that neither any private person, nor even the whole city, could honour the Gods more magnificently and more beautifully than he did. Meeting, however, with the man, he thought fit to ask him after what manner he reverenced the Gods. But Clearchus answered him, that he diligently sacrificed to them at proper times in every month at the new moon, crowning and adorning the statues of Hermes and Hecate, and the other sacred images which were left to us by our ancestors, and that he also honoured the Gods with frankincense, and sacred wafers and cakes. He likewise said, that he performed public sacrifices annually, omitting no festive day; and that in these festivals he worshipped the Gods, not by slaying oxen, nor by cutting victims into fragments, but that he sacrificed whatever he might casually meet with, sedulously offering the first-fruits to the Gods of all the vegetable productions of the seasons, and of all the fruits with which he was supplied. He added, that some of these he placed before the [statues of the] Gods,6 but that he burnt others on their altars; and that, being studious of frugality, he avoided the sacrificing of oxen. SPAN
13. Epigraphy, Audollent, Defix. Tab., 155

14. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 10.2, 485.7

15. Papyri, Derveni Papyrus, 5.6, 6.3-6.4, 7.3-7.8, 8.4-8.10, 9.2, 12.5, 13.4, 13.6-13.9, 15.3-15.4, 15.6-15.7, 16.1, 18.14, 20.2-20.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
allegoresis (allegorical interpretation), in the derveni papyrus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
arch-daimons Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
assistant Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
audience Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
chronos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 380
cosmogony Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
demeter Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
derveni papyrus, as riddle Ward, Clement and Scriptural Exegesis: The Making of a Commentarial Theologian (2022) 35, 36
derveni papyrus McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14; Ward, Clement and Scriptural Exegesis: The Making of a Commentarial Theologian (2022) 35, 36; de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 31, 223, 377, 379, 380, 381, 382, 383
derveni poem Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
destiny, of souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
dreams, interpretation of oracular dreams Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
earth, gaia, ge de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 31, 382
experts, expertise, derveni author as expert Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
great Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
hades, terrors of hades Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
indetermined Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
initiates, hope of the initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
initiations, fees for Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
initiations Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
kronos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 377, 378, 379, 380, 382
leaf (term) McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
meisner, dwayne McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
mystery cults Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
name Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
nature Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
officiants (in the mysteries) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
olympus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
orpheus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
orphic, see hieros logos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 223, 377
orphic de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 31
orphic poems Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
ouranos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 223, 378, 379, 380, 381, 382
pelinna tablet (of 485/486) McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
performance, derveni papyrus McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
phanes / protogonos de Jáuregui, Orphism and Christianity in Late Antiquity (2010) 223, 377
philo of alexandria Ward, Clement and Scriptural Exegesis: The Making of a Commentarial Theologian (2022) 36
phylactery Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
poetry, and performance McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
power Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
profane Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
professionals, of the sacred Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
rhea Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
sky Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
star Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
swallowing, zeus swallowing of the phallus of uranus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
tablets, term McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
thurii tablet (of 489), and the zagreus myth McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
thurii tablet (of 490), and the zagreus myth McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
transformation, and the zagreus myth McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
typhon Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
zeus' Pachoumi, The Concepts of the Divine in the Greek Magical Papyri (2017) 38
zeus Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138; McClay, The Bacchic Gold Tablets and Poetic Tradition: Memory and Performance (2023) 14
zeus new creation of the world Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
δρώμενα Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138
λεγόμενα Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 138