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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



12021
Papyri, Cpj, 2.194
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 2.488 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.488. which honorary reward Continued among them under his successors, who also set apart for them a particular place, that they might live without being polluted [by the Gentiles], and were thereby not so much intermixed with foreigners as before; they also gave them this further privilege, that they should be called Macedonians. Nay, when the Romans got possession of Egypt, neither the first Caesar, nor anyone that came after him, thought of diminishing the honors which Alexander had bestowed on the Jews.
2. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 2.33-2.35 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.33. 4. But let us now see what those heavy and wicked crimes are which Apion charges upon the Alexandrian Jews. “They came (says he) out of Syria, and inhabited near the tempestuous sea, and were in the neighborhood of the dashing of the waves.” 2.34. Now, if the place of habitation includes any thing that is reproachful, this man reproaches not his own real country [Egypt], but what he pretends to be his own country, Alexandria; for all are agreed in this, that the part of that city which is near the sea is the best part of all for habitation. 2.35. Now, if the Jews gained that part of the city by force, and have kept it hitherto without impeachment, this is a mark of their valor: but in reality it was Alexander himself that gave them that place for their habitation, when they obtained equal privileges there with the Macedonians.
3. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0
4. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10.8. To Trajan. When, Sir, your late father, * both by a very fine speech and by setting them a most honourable example himself, urged every citizen to deeds of liberality, I sought permission from him to transfer to a neighbouring township all the statues of the emperors which had come into my possession by various bequests and were kept just as I had received them ill my distant estates, and to add thereto a statue of himself. He granted the request and made most flattering references to myself, and I immediately wrote to the decurions asking them to assign me a plot of ground upon which I might erect a temple ** at my own cost, and they offered to let me choose the site myself as a mark of appreciation of the task I had undertaken. But first my own ill-health, then your father's illness, and subsequently the anxieties of the office you bestowed upon me, have prevented my proceeding with the work. However, I think the present is a convenient opportunity for getting on with it, for my month of duty ends on the Kalends of September and the following month contains a number of holidays. I ask, therefore, as a special favour, that you will allow me to adorn with your statue the work which I am about to begin ; and secondly, that in order to complete it as soon as possible, you will grant me leave of absence. It would be alien to my frank disposition if I were to conceal from your goodness the fact that you will, if you grant me leave, be incidentally aiding very materially my private fices. The rent of my estates in that district exceeds 400,000 sesterces, and if the new tets are to be settled in time for the next pruning, the letting of the farms must not be any further delayed. Besides, the succession of bad vintages we have had forces me to consider the question of making certain abatements, and I cannot enter into that question unless I am on the spot. So, Sir, if for these reasons you grant me leave for thirty days, I shall owe to your kindness the speedy fulfilment of a work of loyalty and the settlement of my private fices. I cannot reduce the length of leave I ask for to narrower limits, inasmuch as the township and the estates I have spoken of are more than a hundred and fifty miles from Rome. 0
5. Anon., Letter of Aristeas, 181

181. my naval victory over Antigonus. Therefore I shall be glad to feast with you to-day.' 'Everything that you may have occasion to use', he said, 'shall be prepared (for you) in a befitting manner and for me also with you.' After they had expressed their delight, he gave orders that the best quarters near the citadel should be assigned to them, and that preparations should be made for the banquet.
6. Papyri, Cpj, 2.209



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agrippa i (jewish king), exemplary function of Edwards, In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus (2023) 158
apion Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
bayes rule Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 130
city of alexandria, city walls Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
city of alexandria, island of pharos Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
city of alexandria, necropoleis and cemeteries Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
city of alexandria, royal quarters Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
damnatio memoriae, implicit criticism of by josephus Edwards, In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus (2023) 158
damnatio memoriae Edwards, In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus (2023) 158
egypt Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 130
fiscus iudaicus Edwards, In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus (2023) 158
gaius (roman emperor), depiction in josephus Edwards, In the Court of the Gentiles: Narrative, Exemplarity, and Scriptural Adaptation in the Court-Tales of Flavius Josephus (2023) 158
jerusalem Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 130
jews in alexandria, jewish district/delta quarter Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
josephus, on alexandrias jewish quarter Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
judaean desert Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 130
oxyrhynchus Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
philo, description of the delta quarter Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
sabbath Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 130
saturday Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 130
strabo, description of alexandria Schliesser et al., Alexandria: Hub of the Hellenistic World (2021) 20
tuesday Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 130
week' Katzoff, On Jews in the Roman World: Collected Studies (2019) 130